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12

The simplest solution is to drill the dowel hole after you fit the joint together. Fit the joint and make sure everything's square and true, then drill straight through the mortice and tenon in one go and insert the dowel. Chisel/plane and sand it flush and you should be good to go. Making a mark on the outside of the mortice where you want to drill will ...


11

This should be a good starter project, here are a few tips I've picked up over the years: Even pressure treated wood will deteriorate over time if it's exposed or in direct contact with the ground/moisture. Do what you can to protect it from the elements and get it raised off of the soil. Use a moisture barrier between wood and concrete. Take care to ...


9

It could possibly be done using Mortise and Tenon joints, however, it looks like this table simply uses Hanger Bolts. If you look at a picture from the bottom of the table, you'll notice there are holes bored in the underside of the table top. This is likely where the nut would be attached to the bolt, which is in turn screwed into the leg.


8

Route the pieces, cut the miter, then assemble. I believe that will give the best look. You could just practice all three on some scrap to see which you like.


8

There are a lot of ways you could go here. Conceal The Screws If you just make a simple butt joint like you have in your picture, you can do as @AlaskaMan says in the comments - countersink the screws and put a plug or putty over the screw head. That will hide the screw; the plug / putty will be visible but less noticeable than the screw. ...


7

You'll be fine, though you might want to go buy a bag of setting type (dry powder, mix with water - sets, rather than drying out like the stuff in a bucket) joint compound, both because it's the right type for use with mesh tape, and becasue of this tid-bit from USG: Open spaces between panels of 6.4 mm (1/4􏰀) or more should be filled with compound at ...


7

The 2x4s are joined with a half-lap joint (or a variation on a scarf joint). It's unclear from your diagram if there is any joinery holding the 2x4s down to the 4x4 or if they just rest on top of the post. Not sure what you mean by a "regular saw", but half laps can be cut by most saws - circular saw and table saw are most common, though you could use a ...


6

You have probably damaged the seal between your toilet and the flange. This seal is usually formed by a wax ring that forms closely to the flange and toilet base when the toilet is installed. If you've moved the toilet significantly, you may have opened up a hole in this seal where water can leak when your toilet is draining. It's sometimes possible to ...


6

ChrisF's solution will provide you with nice, stable drilling support and it will make sure the holes line up perfectly on both parts. But if you don't want to use glue, keep in mind that it's not necessarily a bad thing if the holes don't line up perfectly; in fact, there is a specific technique called "drawboring" that requires this and makes an extra-...


6

In a miter joint you're gluing end grain to end grain. That's inherently weaker than most joints. If you really want this appearance, at least spline the corners so there's significant long-grain gluing area. A mitered half-lap would be another possibility, or one of the other joints that mimics a miter in appearance but has something stronger underneath it....


5

Most tapers place the metal corner bead first. This is primarily because if you were to do any taping first you'd have to wait until that dries to install corner bead. It's a matter of efficiency. It's also usually best to keep metal bead set snugly to the drywall, with nothing behind it. This allows you to keep it straighter and on plane. It should ...


4

Fewer points of failure Bending results in fewer high risk failure points. A continuously bent pipe has 2 high risk failure points. Whereas a similar length of pipe made with a bunch of fittings, has 2 high risk failure points per fitting. Quieter Bending a radius will provide less resistance within the pipe, so water will flow smoother. In a ...


4

You can use either all the way through. I have personally used both all the way through more than a few times and have mixed. There are generally some differences. the lightweight end mix is thicker, meaning that the regular can actually be better for a final coat since it goes on thinner the lightweight is easier to sand but I hardly sand... so this ...


4

The point of the dowelled/drawbored mortise-tenon joint is not to line up the to parts, but to create a tension that draws the tenon tightly into the mortise. Therefore, rather than drilling though the mortise and tenon together, the drilling process is divided into three steps: Drill trough the mortise alone. Insert the tenon, and use the drill to mark ...


4

The issues with the compression fitting have been addressed. The brass flange fitting, the rubber gasket, and the threaded pipe is the "toilet spud". Replacements are available if the rubber is perished or the metal parts somehow damaged. The flange nut looks pretty well bonded to the threaded portion. Soak well with WD-40 and let it soak in. There are ...


4

How do I connect [1x4 wood] together at 90 degrees while maintaining a solid connection? If you can obtain a hand-saw (e.g. tenon-saw/back-saw), some sandpaper and some wood glue, you can make lap-joints. I find they are the easiest way for me to make rigid joints in wood. To join wood the other way, for a strong joint I'd try a simple finger joint (box ...


4

The joints in the design you referenced are actually plain lap joints held together by lag bolts or lag screws. If you wanted to get a bit fancier, you could always use half-lap joints or one of the other variations shown below. These will require a bit more work, but all but the dovetail lap shown below can still be done with just a circular saw and a ...


4

I'm not sure if this exists or not. Probably not. However, you have an X Y Problem I'm trying to build a piece of furniture that I can take apart quickly/easily and set up again in another apartment. Commonly used solutions include Furniture bolts Mitre bolts Knock-down fittings AKA furniture blocks Cam lock bolts Woodworking Joints See https://...


4

I live in the Pacific Northwest also. I have done several paver walks, I have used regular sand and polymeric sand. What I have found is a good even base is the most important part of the job. Regular sand tends to need a new bag about every 3 years and polymeric is going on 5 but will need an add this year. For me both tend to grow grass because our horses ...


4

Isherwood's answer is great, however, I'd question why you are using lap joints at all if that's the type of vertical you are thinking about. It's far less work to not bother with the lap joints and just tie the sides directly into vertical posts like this: However if you insist on using lap joints I'd say you want every face to have to be made of it's own ...


4

That railing is probably fastened to posts on both to the left and right of your picture. One scheme to shore up the existing railing would be to come up from underneath the existing railing with a new wood piece that is the same dimensions as the existing one and screw it up into the existing rail. If the new piece is straight it will push up the sagging ...


3

There's many variables, many choices. You could just slam some screws into the shelf edges and it may be adequate. Pocket screws are a big improvement because you are no longer screwing into the panel edges. They work really well in cabinet face frames because there is plenty of room for screw embedment. For a bookcase, embedment is limited, so you should ...


3

A usual method is to go down the edge of the wall with a surface bullnose, showing a "knife edge" at the corner. This means the tile rolls down to meet the corner. Another method, if your bullnose has finished bottoms, is to overlap the edge and go "around the corner", having the bullnose round into the outside wall (the wall that has the striped wallpaper)...


3

Use a biscuit joiner. Then glue and clamp to dry. But depends what you using them for. There not going to be heaps strong if the timber spands over a distance.


3

Use waterproof glue, make the joint tight-fitting, and leave the screws on the shelf. A lap joint is one of the strongest of all the glued wood joints, and a well-fitted glued lap joint will be at least as strong without the screws as with them. But... there's a condition. How wide are the two planks forming that joint? And which wood is being used? I ask ...


3

I would just drill pilot holes and screw it together, you don't need to do fancy cuts in the wood. If you need extra stability, put in a diagonal (diagonal cuts all the way across a board are much easier than notching). I would put in a small diagonal brace on each corner, although it would be easier to just use a large one across the whole frame. I built a ...


3

The drywall mud is just as likely to stick to the aluminum flashing as it is to the board. Just observe how well dried mud sticks to your drywall mud taping knives. It may be possible to put a light coat of mineral oil or silicon lubricant spray on the metal beforehand to minimize the mud adhesion. But you would definitely want to experiment with some small ...


3

If you have a single screw with that level of shear strength, it will also have minimum distance specifications for the material in which it is used. As an example, a fastener of 12 mm diameter should be placed no closer than 6 mm from the edge of the material. Regarding spacing relative to one another, the material used is a factor as well as many other ...


3

Option 1: Don't use screws. Old-school cabinet makers used dowels and glue. It's not difficult, but you'll want to read up on alignment techniques. Joints are very strong. image source Option 2: Use pocket screws. They're what modern cabinet makers use. They're probably cost- and effort-prohibitive in your case, though, since they require special tools (or ...


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