33

Three things: Yes, you were supposed to apply a primer. Fresh joint compound and drywall soak up paint like crazy. The primer serves to seal the joint compound and drywall and create a consistent surface. However, you've already painted - and the paint will do the same thing - just not as effectively and you'll probably need to do a third coat. Paint ...


29

The traditional solution for a pulled out towel rack is to remove the towel rack, patch the holes (usu two on each end) and place the rack slightly higher or lower. An experienced or inventive person can patch the existing hole and, by adding reinforcement, remount in the same location. These racks are secured to a pair of metal brackets on the wall with ...


27

You want to add backing to the inside sides of the existing studs as well as to the centre of the span. The simplest way to do this is to cut the new backing (preferably 2x4, or whatever the existing stud dimensions are) about 4" longer than the height of the opening and screw them to the existing studs. The cut one more piece of backing to the same length ...


26

It's a matter of preference, but I would float scrap lumber backing at four locations: Down both sides Across the bottom between the two studs Across the between the two studs just below the plumbing penetrations Anywhere else that seems too flexy when you do a little press-testing 1/2" or thicker plywood and 1-by or 2-by lumber work well. This backing ...


25

Sorry, there is no shortcut here. It's likely damaged well beyond what you can see and the only fix is to tear that all out, remove the drywall that is likely crumbling, replace/repair any studs, check the bottom plate and subfloor for damage, and then restore the entire thing.


23

With the COVID stuff going on the last thing you want to do is have your family have respiratory issues due to mold. There is mold growing behind your shower, probably on every shower wall. Money or time spent on patching this is both fruitless and reckless. That article you linked to is click-bait nonsense - maybe 1 in 1000 showers have a little leak ...


17

As you have found out, curtain rod supports do not do well hanging from plaster anchors. They really should be attached to studs, but where that is impossible, toggle anchors give you a chance at success. I prefer the solid bar type that pivots after insertion. The drywall in the immediate vicinity is beyond saving. Even toggles will not have much solid to ...


15

You say you're looking for an expedient fix for the duration of the lockdown? That's pretty simple then. Buy a cheap shower curtain, cut it roughly to the size of the missing tiles, and Duck-tape it over that area. Duck tape (the brand) will comfortably stay waterproof for a few months; other brands could well be equally good. If you plan to renovate the ...


13

Get to the Studs Regular anchors are fine for an ordinary towel bar. But not for a grab bar. For regular anchors to work here, you would need to (a) patch the drywall, (b) install the towel bar with heavy-duty anchors and hope the patch is strong enough to hold them and (c) teach the tenant - and future tenants - to not use the towel bar as a grab bar. The ...


10

Fix the leak first - this appears to be water damaged, so replacing it without stopping the source of water will be pointless, as the replacement will be water-damaged again. Probably the leak is associated with the window (though it could potentially be coming from anywhere higher, all the way to the roof.) Once the leak is stopped, you cut back to sound ...


10

This happens when bathroom fixtures are only fastened to drywall -- such fixtures are easily ripped out. If you have young children, they will be mysteriously compelled to swing like monkeys from these. Don't ask how I know. Here's how I permanently fix such fixtures: Remove the fixture, if it's still partially attached to the wall. Use a 3" hole saw to ...


9

I'm a Drywaller of 25 years, the saw blade suggestions are DANGEROUS there are possible screws going up the center of that stud ... do not use a saw blade, the guy who suggested the utility knife had it right, make sure you have a screw gun handy incase you come across a screw.


9

First off, Don't use thinset on drywall. Use a mastic adhesive because it will be better for the damaged area. After the tiles have been installed, use an epoxy grout for maximum strength. Seal around the tub with a quality silicone caulk. Note: This would not be a normal recommended repair from me but since you stated some parameters, I tried to stick to ...


9

Hang another shower curtain on the back wall with a tension-rod. That will let it continue to dry out and should be cost-effective until you can take it down to the studs and see whether the wood needs to be repaired.


8

We've done a double layer of drywall to slow the spread of fire in multi-unit developments, specifically between the ceiling and attic space. However, judging by the gap, I'm guessing that you might have this done as a retrofit to block sound. There will be somewhere that the drywall is attached, and it's likely going to be metal tracks running every 16". ...


8

I think your idea of a wood panel isn't bad, but I would go the extra mile here: Buy a nicer board, a couple of basic hinges, and a knob Paint the mounted opening white and fix your drywall Cut your board to be large enough to cover the opening and paint it white Attach the knob and hinges, then mount to the opening on the side closest to the wall It looks ...


8

I side against those who say retiling the wall is the ONLY way to do this. Nonsense. My quickfix is similar to graham's, but I think a little more durable since even joint mud is generally very absorbant! Now you say the visible drywall is decent shape and not rotted out. If that's so, what you want to do is spray down the lip of the exposed drywall lightly ...


7

Is it possible to fix it? yes, but there is an awful lot of work to be done in order to do so. Each of those gaps has to be filled with mud and covered with tape. Given the shrinkage that occurs as mud dries, most of them are going to require several layers to fill properly. In particular, filling in around the ceiling fixture is likely to be problematic ...


7

Use a utility knife to score through the drywall. It will take several passes to get all the way through. Go slow, be careful, and don't over cut at the ends. Only go 3/4" onto the stud, going an inch or more could cause you to expose the whole stud and weaken the drywall on the opposite side. I do agree that doing this is not enough for that wide of a span....


7

Since this is being used as a handrail, perhaps it should be supplemented by a proper vertically-mounted hand rail at the corner? You could replace the existing towel rail with something thinner, perfectly adequate for holding towels but too thin to be a handrail. Second option could be to add a backing board behind the rail. This will help spread the ...


7

I don't ever attach drywall unless it has attached backing on each side. To float the backing and have it come out solid and flush and not cause drilling issues is both a thing that needs to be practiced and it needs the appropriate access. For something like this I would go to next stud for sure. Also I would build a little access box jutted out ...


6

The paint likely does not match perfectly, either in color or in amount of gloss. Those color matching machines can be hit or miss... If it bothers you - paint the entire wall with the new paint and you’ll never notice the slight difference in color.


6

You just want to fix it for the shorter term which makes sense to me. Remove the old dry wall and replace with a piece of 1/2" sheathing making sure that the ends are supported so the tile won't crack there later. Then glue on the tile. This will hold you over as you desire but is not a true fix or longer term solution.


5

Since you want to have the drywall piece be 5" high I think you will want to have backer behind it for its full height. Consider making it 5.5" high and then using a piece of 2x6 lumber (that comes 5.5 inches wide) as the backer piece. Cut a couple of pieces to straddle across the bottom of this opening at the back and middle to hold up the shelf the full ...


5

Four inch and six inch recessed fixtures consist of two main parts - the can and the trim. They need to match. The first issue will be getting the old can out. If it is old-work style, it may be held in just by pressure clips on the sides, fairly easy to remove. If it is new-work style, it will be attached to framing members, either directly or with a brace ...


5

Since you have the original paint and it appears to be good, I would get a roller and work the entire area with a 2nd coat, I would work from the patches out so the roller is not putting as much paint out towards the edges this will help to fade the change in new to old and the second coat should cover the patches to not be noticable, with this said you may ...


5

Since this got ZERO love, and I have finished the job, figured I would post what I did. Simply bought some wire mesh from the local home goods store, and screwed it directly into the wood lathe after breaking out the hole a bit more. That gave me a good base for my 20 minute hot mud to mushroom through. As for the rounded corner -- it was nothing ...


5

Drywall. Thin (1/4 inch is available) drywall. It can be screwed to the subsurface or glued if there is not easy access to wood or steel framing. Tape the seams and the edges, a few coates of joint compound, and it is smooth sailing. If the subsurface is not level enough, a few shims, also glued to the wall should let you get a fairly flat surface. This ...


4

I'm not aware of anything special for fire rating a joint in drywall, just use the same joint compound and tape you would use on the rest of your walls. Fire rated drywall will cut similar to normal drywall, but it will offer a lot more resistance because of the embedded fiberglass. When sealing any gaps or cracks, they make special fire rated expanding ...


4

Yes. The purpose of primer is to seal the raw plaster/gypsum/drywall and create a better surface for finish paint that won't soak it up. As long as the rest of the wall is properly cleaned before painting (paint doesn't bond well to dirt, grease, etc), your finish coat should look even and consistent. For your situation, assuming the existing paint was ...


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