Hot answers tagged

35

When I had to do this for our basement I used an "Inside Pipe Cutter", a fancy bit that fits into your standard drill. Looks something like this: You chuck it in your drill, put the blade at the height you want on the interior of the pipe, and run the drill, cutting through the sidewalls. Won't be 100% perfectly straight unless you have a very ...


28

That valve is for a different type of piping system called CPVC and the sizes and fittings are different. The difference is deliberate because CPVC is rated for hot water whereas regular PVC is not; they don't want people to accidentally (or deliberately, to save money) install regular PVC pipe or fittings on a hot water system. Look at the valve label.


24

Either you glued them correctly (I prefer "cleaner, then primer, then glue" for the most reliable connections) or you'll need to re-glue them after the joints fail. Nothing you add to the outside will change that. You do need to paint or otherwise cover them to prevent damage from the UV in sunlight, since you mention that they are above-ground. ...


21

Given all the ideas, the obvious solution would seem to be don't use sand. Instead, fill the bottom pipe with cement. Or fill it mostly with gravel with a few inches of cement or silicone sealant to hold the gravel in place.


14

Don't mix your (PVC) streams Electrical PVC conduit and PVC sanitary (supply, DWV) piping may look similar (save for the color), but are made to very different standards. Plumbing PVC needs to be rated to a higher working pressure for supply piping use, and also is designed to be used from fitting to fitting, with female-female couplers used to join ...


12

That is a strainer wye. There is a metal mesh filter in there to trap sediment/debris; it can be removed and cleaned as necessary.


12

A pipe cutter may fit in the hole.


11

Two ideas... Fill the pipe with sand, and then use an expandable foam like "Great Stuff" to fill the last several inches of the pipe. The polyurethane foam should stick well to the inside of the PVC, and the sand will not be able to pass through. A standard coupler has a lip in the middle to stop the pipe from sliding all the way through. Cut a disk of ...


11

Good pictures. You have an unusual configuration for that drain. Typically, there is only one drain line coming from the wall into the kitchen cabinet. That would have one trap and upstream of the trap are the sink, disposal, and perhaps a dishwasher drain (you don't appear to have one in this cabinet.) What you have is not necessarily wrong, but if you ...


11

A Dremel rotary tool seems perfect for this. If you don't have one then this seems like a good chance to justify buying one as you will quickly find new uses for it. You can use it to cut from outside the pipe or even inside assuming the tool would fit. Just mark the circumference with a sharpie so that you can ensure a nice square cut. If it's not perfectly ...


11

You discovered wrong. Ethernet runs at 100MHz and up, your line voltage at 60Hz is virtually DC at that frequently difference. With that said, you should still run your data cables in conduit. Not for interference concerns, but so that in 2040 you can easily replace the cat5 with something new for our 20K ultra VR direct brain video or whatever is the deal ...


10

Your best bet to fix the leak is to turn off the water, drain the line, and then cut out the bad section and replace with some new glued in fittings and pipe pieces.


10

An oscillating tool might fit beside the pipe with blade rotated to 90 degrees Or buy this fancy blade for it


10

Hands down, cable saw This works faster than you think. The only thing you have to be careful with, mark the pipe with sharpie first and watch that you keep your cut square. If you first score the pipe all the way around on the sharpie mark, that might make it easier to keep square. I would only use this if I had it on hand - I have cut a lot of PVC with ...


9

When installed properly, the life should be indefinite. The hot/cold should have little effect, unless those temperatures are extreme.


9

There are also internal pipe wrenches available just for this situation:


9

Bunch the screen over the end of the pipe bent back along the nearby sides of the pipe, Then secure in place with a suitably sized screw gear clamp. Picture Source


9

Steel EMT will rust over time in a buried environment with moisture where PVC will last virtually forever unless it's exposed to sunlight. I'd go with PVC which is also likely to be less expensive.


9

Add loose soil then carefully compact next to and under the pipes. Repeat until you have compacted soil fully supporting the pipes from underneath. Then add soil in batches compacting each batch with your feet or with a manual compactor plate on a shaft. The purpose of this procedure is to avoid leaving uncompacted soil underneath and beside the pipes. ...


8

Depends. If the conductors are 6 AWG or smaller. There is enough free space. It's not a short radius conduit body. The volume is durably and legibly marked by the manufacturer. Only then can the conduit body contain splices. In your specific case, I don't see the volume listed in the specifications section on the Home Depot page. So you'd have to check the ...


8

PVC is not rated for and not safe for compressed air service, with the limited exceptions of "if buried in the ground or completely screened in wire mesh to catch the shards." It makes lovely shrapnel - it has injured people. Nice and cheap until it costs you something more dear than money. Here's a 480 PSI (water, not air - no PVC is made or rated for ...


8

It sounds like you're using a crappy copper pipe cutter. To cut PVC, you want one of these instead: I've used mine to cut thousands of PVC pipes and it does the job quickly and easily. You can probably find one for less than $10 and it will serve you well for life.


8

I've cut chair mats by laying them on a flat work surface. Then secure a metal straight edge along the cut line. (In my case I clamped a long piece of aluminum bar stock in place to the work surface with the mat in between). A utility knife with a sharp blade was then used to score a cut line along the straight edge. Chair mats are a relatively soft plastic ...


8

I would use Oatey “hot” glue it sets faster than regular but cost a bit more , only get a small can as it evaporates faster also. You can see the label most standard solvents require an hour or longer depending on the diameter , but hot glue is ready in as short as 10 minutes. Primers also help but hot glue doesn’t need primer or the orange stuff I use doesn’...


8

The glue normally used is a pvc cement and « welds » the joint together. I would cut that tee out and fit a new one with extensions to meet up with the existing pipes using couplers. When you get the old part out, try separating a joint - they tend to « tear » the surface.


8

Speaking as somebody who's spent much more time messing around with networks and power cables than with bricks and beams: keep them moderately separated but don't go full paranoid. Power cables are substantially more robust than network cables, have different failure modes, and are tested differently by people with different skills and equipment. Network ...


7

There are two main factors that determine what is used: Code requirements (as well as the project's specifications) Cost ABS and PVC are the cheapest, however there can be limitations with their use in larger buildings due to fire code requirements. Where fire codes requirements limit the use of plastics, either cast-iron or DWV copper is used for the ...


6

Absolutely not!! Go for it, but hang on tight to the pipe, it has a tenancy to roll in a chop saw.


6

Lotsa options, including the hacksaw method mentioned by bombcar, none of them foolproof or easy:


6

I used a piece of a nylon stocking, smoothed the edges of the PVC, stretched it over the edges and gave it a few wraps of electrical tape... been there for at least 8 years.


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