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28

That valve is for a different type of piping system called CPVC and the sizes and fittings are different. The difference is deliberate because CPVC is rated for hot water whereas regular PVC is not; they don't want people to accidentally (or deliberately, to save money) install regular PVC pipe or fittings on a hot water system. Look at the valve label.


22

I see no reason why you should cut threads on a PVC pipe. It seems to me that this would be unnecessarily difficult and would weaken the pipe. You should, instead, get a slip to thread adapter and glue it onto the pipe to thread it wherever you like. Any big-box hardware store or irrigation department should be able to provide this adapter. Edit: Here is a ...


20

Your best bet would be to get some 1/2" PVC Couplings with threaded port and some Misting Nozzles. You should be able to find them both online, or at your local landscaping/gardening center. This setup would allow you to get the desired spray pattern, by selecting the appropriate nozzles.


20

Given all the ideas, the obvious solution would seem to be don't use sand. Instead, fill the bottom pipe with cement. Or fill it mostly with gravel with a few inches of cement or silicone sealant to hold the gravel in place.


14

All PVC is subject to UV light degradation. PVC without UV protection will eventually suffer a loss of impact resistance. Your pipe will be whole, until impact at which it will shatter or crack instead of flex. Some PVC (PVC UVR) is UV resistant. The sunlight still damages the PVC pipe, but it is in a matrix of other chemicals that compete for the UV ...


14

Don't mix your (PVC) streams Electrical PVC conduit and PVC sanitary (supply, DWV) piping may look similar (save for the color), but are made to very different standards. Plumbing PVC needs to be rated to a higher working pressure for supply piping use, and also is designed to be used from fitting to fitting, with female-female couplers used to join ...


12

That is a strainer wye. There is a metal mesh filter in there to trap sediment/debris; it can be removed and cleaned as necessary.


11

Two ideas... Fill the pipe with sand, and then use an expandable foam like "Great Stuff" to fill the last several inches of the pipe. The polyurethane foam should stick well to the inside of the PVC, and the sand will not be able to pass through. A standard coupler has a lip in the middle to stop the pipe from sliding all the way through. Cut a disk of ...


10

Your best bet to fix the leak is to turn off the water, drain the line, and then cut out the bad section and replace with some new glued in fittings and pipe pieces.


9

PVC is relatively inexpensive so the main cost is installing it. If your furnace is near an exterior wall, they'll simply make a hole in that wall and run the lines directly out. If your furnace isn't close to an exterior wall, then you need to run the lines through the ceiling, preferably in the direction of the joists, until you reach an exterior wall. If ...


9

When installed properly, the life should be indefinite. The hot/cold should have little effect, unless those temperatures are extreme.


9

There are also internal pipe wrenches available just for this situation:


9

Bunch the screen over the end of the pipe bent back along the nearby sides of the pipe, Then secure in place with a suitably sized screw gear clamp. Picture Source


9

Steel EMT will rust over time in a buried environment with moisture where PVC will last virtually forever unless it's exposed to sunlight. I'd go with PVC which is also likely to be less expensive.


8

Depends. If the conductors are 6 AWG or smaller. There is enough free space. It's not a short radius conduit body. The volume is durably and legibly marked by the manufacturer. Only then can the conduit body contain splices. In your specific case, I don't see the volume listed in the specifications section on the Home Depot page. So you'd have to check the ...


8

PVC is not rated for and not safe for compressed air service, with the limited exceptions of "if buried in the ground or completely screened in wire mesh to catch the shards." It makes lovely shrapnel - it has injured people. Nice and cheap until it costs you something more dear than money. Here's a 480 PSI (water, not air - no PVC is made or rated for ...


8

It sounds like you're using a crappy copper pipe cutter. To cut PVC, you want one of these instead: I've used mine to cut thousands of PVC pipes and it does the job quickly and easily. You can probably find one for less than $10 and it will serve you well for life.


8

I've cut chair mats by laying them on a flat work surface. Then secure a metal straight edge along the cut line. (In my case I clamped a long piece of aluminum bar stock in place to the work surface with the mat in between). A utility knife with a sharp blade was then used to score a cut line along the straight edge. Chair mats are a relatively soft plastic ...


8

I would use Oatey “hot” glue it sets faster than regular but cost a bit more , only get a small can as it evaporates faster also. You can see the label most standard solvents require an hour or longer depending on the diameter , but hot glue is ready in as short as 10 minutes. Primers also help but hot glue doesn’t need primer or the orange stuff I use doesn’...


8

The glue normally used is a pvc cement and « welds » the joint together. I would cut that tee out and fit a new one with extensions to meet up with the existing pipes using couplers. When you get the old part out, try separating a joint - they tend to « tear » the surface.


7

I highly doubt a paint store sells what you are looking for. When you join two pieces of PVC, you aren't joining them together, but welding them together. PVC Cleaner (AKA Primer) cleans all dirt, and oils off the parts and soften them a bit, so they weld together properly and the glue can penetrate the PVC deeper. The glue then works on a molecular level ...


7

I haven't tried this, so no idea if it'd work, but one thought would be to find a needle and a torch. Get the needle as hot as you can and then poke it into the PVC to melt a tiny hole.


7

You can purchase a toilet flange repair at any big box hardware store. Remove the wax ring (buy a new one), remove the bolts, and mount this on top of the existing broken flange: Then reattach the toilet as per normal, making sure not to over tighten. Tip, seat the toilet firmly on the wax ring before you tighten the bolts, and use a STANDARD sized wax ...


7

The best lubrication I've found is some good ol' Elbow Grease™. Actually, you should measure the proper lengths and just cut. Then glue it up and install. You can mark on the PVC how far it should go into the fitting if you want to be really precise. However PVC itself expands and contracts a lot with temperature change and is fairly flexible anyway. So, in ...


6

Is it expensive? Well that depends on your definition of "expensive", the amount of work you need to do, and who you get to do the work. 90% efficient furnaces require PVC venting directly outside, as opposed to using a chimney like the older 80% furnaces do. The extra expense is entirely dependent on how easy it is to route these pipes from your furnace to ...


6

In these situations, I use bulkhead fittings. It saves the annoyance to getting this stuff to seal properly, any slight leverage and there's now a leak. These are available in several sizes at most plumbing supply stores. If there's a gentle curve to the surface this has to penetrate, I've used a large O-ring instead of the supplied gasket. They're available ...


6

There are two main factors that determine what is used: Code requirements (as well as the project's specifications) Cost ABS and PVC are the cheapest, however there can be limitations with their use in larger buildings due to fire code requirements. Where fire codes requirements limit the use of plastics, either cast-iron or DWV copper is used for the ...


6

Lotsa options, including the hacksaw method mentioned by bombcar, none of them foolproof or easy:


6

I used a piece of a nylon stocking, smoothed the edges of the PVC, stretched it over the edges and gave it a few wraps of electrical tape... been there for at least 8 years.


5

You could try the gray colored Schedule 80 PVC pipe. This is a much heavier duty material that will stand up to being outdoors. It is recommended by manufacturers. such as U.S. Plastic Corp, that PVC pipe and fittings be painted after installation with a coat of white water based latex paint to provide for UV resistance. The UV light is what is part of the ...


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