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16

People use the wrong screws outside quite a lot, but thankfully there are good alternatives. Outdoor decking and fencing are commonly assembled with coated screws advertised for such. They typically come in tan or green depending on the application and can hold up for a long time without rust or staining the wood. Stainless steel screws are another option ...


9

Stainless steel deck screws will not rust. I've used them many times on all types of lumber with great results. But screwing into end grain never works well, put a piece of 2x4 into each corner and screw into the sides of it. The joint will be much stronger.


6

Remove the castor, get some PL premium, glue it back on. Or just get some small pieces of wood (wooden match sticks - minus the head - and jamb those into the hole with or without glue, cut the ends of the wood pieces off flush and screw into that mess.


4

First, are the products chemically compatible? The mere fact that they're water-based does not make it so. The best place to ask is the factory. However, there's a bigger problem. Even if they're compatible, a colored paint diluted (what, 2:1?) with a clear coating will have very poor coverage. If it's going to take 6 coats to get decent coverage on ...


3

The short answer is that, for residential framing, the only situations that call for screws are: Where building hardware specifies screw fasteners Where squeaks are a concern and adhesive would be impractical Where access is limited with respect to hammers or air nailers Where the need for later non-destructive removal is expected Everything else is ...


3

Glue in toothpicks, or drill a 1/4" hole and glue in a dowel, or use a fatter screw if the application permits. They also make "screw grippers" for stripped out holes, but they cost more than any of these solutions, and are generally weaker. If you're glueing stuff in, wait a few hours before loading it.


3

I've tried a few cuts like this and got one of the crazy devices shown below. It's a "multi angle measuring ruler". Even if you get the angles right, you still have to cut the wood accurately and that requires a good miter saw, and even then, be prepared to do it a few times to get the saw set just right. This is an art and it takes a lot of practice It's ...


3

This is yet another one of Alaska mans answers to one of rbhat's questions. Oohhh, i get to say it again, Glue and Screw. Drill pilot holes from the bottom side of the lower 2x4 all the way through, Clamp the lower 2x4 in place and use 4 inch deck screws to screw up through the pilot holes and into the bottom of the upper 2x4 . ( 2x4 are only 3 1/2 ...


3

Glue can be pretty strong when you've got plenty of area (like there), although unless you've got some diagonal bracing, it's going to be wobbly whatever fixing you use. Most people don't use glue because it takes a while to dry, so you either run out of clamps after a couple of joints, or the clamps get in the way of the next thing. (by comparison you can ...


3

I use a shellac based primer for things such as this. It has better hiding ability then just paint or regular primer. Give it two or more coats and see if it hides the problem and then you can apply the final paint. If you still see a shadow after the shellac primer you could try a coat of bonding primer over the shellac primer.


3

Since you are cantilevering off the wall, the verticals must be exemplary. This is a very significant structural side load. I would consider Unistrut, and it must be tied to studs proper, never to drywall itself. If the stays (diagonal cables) came the whole width of the bed, they would carry up to 100% of the occupancy load if the person is rolled out ...


2

Many designs have legs at both exterior corners, but your design uses stays, the stays should reach more than half way across the platform, else they and the hinge will be seeing magnified loads. the top end of the stay should be as high as possible on the frame. perhaps consider folding stays instead of telescopic. The ladder should rest on the floor when ...


2

Its termite droppings. No smell cuz it's pretty much sawdust


2

I like the toothpick idea. We used to stick a golf tee in stripped holes as a filler. Was usually the right size to fill and tapered.


2

From what I understand, white spirits/mineral spirits should work, but turpentine is maybe better. I also understand that WD-40 will work as well, but I have no first-hand experience using it for removing linseed oil. Incidentally, I believe turpentine in German is "Terpentin" while "Terpentinersatz" is white spirits. Both seem to be available here, for ...


1

To answer your question, “What sort of fasteners are best for general Wood Framing?” I see that you capitalized “Wood Framing”, so I’ll concentrate on wood framing. The Code stipulates the size, type and spacing for “wood framing”. It should be noted that this is a minimum requirement, but using a 20d spike when a 16d nail is required does not improve ...


1

Another possibility is camp fuel. This is essentially naptha, but is often more easily found. VERY flamable. Use outside. Once softened to remove the gunk, you can get plastic razor blades from some woodworking stores (used to remove glue excess without hurting wood surface.) A credit card may work. Final residue should come off with fine steel wool. ...


1

Naphtha is my go-to solvent for degreasing tools and auto parts, removing adhesive residue from stickers, etc. I don't recall ever having trouble with it damaging a surface; it's likely not to harm the lacquer. In the USA it is often sold as "VM&P Naphtha" or similar, meaning "varnish makers & painters." I haven't tried cleaning (removing) linseed ...


1

The end of that wooden beam will move slightly with humidity and temperature changes, attempts to fill that shallow void with concrete may end in dissappointment. I'd cut a small rebate using a oscillating tool or grinder and place a piece of fibre-cement sheet over the opening, glue it in-place with builder's filler. then render over it to match the ...


1

Here is a tutorial using a router-cut "Side Cleat Groove" and matching wall bracket. https://www.canadianwoodworking.com/plans-projects/levitating-shelf Side Cleat Groove – After the shelf is dry, a few passes on the router table will leave you with a groove to accept the side bracket. Next, cut the stopped groove in the same divider using a 1" ...


1

Edit: I didn't read the requirement that it be supported on the ends. The easiest way to support it from the ends would be with z-clips But they are 2 1/8 wide which is likely too wide. Tiberhan clips appear to be smaller. You may be able to recess it into the end of the board to reduce the gap between it and the wall. https://www.amazon.com/Bracket-...


1

Glue and screw. The glue seals the gaps, reducing rot risk. The screws will be a more reliable, and quicker, way to fasten them in place. Square braces are kinda ugly though imo. A diagonal brace (made by cutting a 2*4 at 45° in opposite directions) would be more appealing - again imo. Look, for example, at corner bracing used in post and beam structures.


1

I would use screws, especially since they will be hidden so you don't have to worry about seeing exposed screw heads.


1

In addition to the previous two answers, I recommend against galvanized hardware in pressure treated wood unless the packaging specifically indicates that they are suitable for that use. Afaik only hot dipped galvanized is suitable for use with PT, nails are often electrogalvanized.


1

Attaching a short block of 2xN (12", 16", double 8", whatever works) across 2 or 3 of those flat studs should provide a rigid enough support with 3" of depth for a 4-corner lag attached TV mount. The 2xN is screwed to the studs every few inches with enough smaller fasteners with enough bite depth, spreading a heavy load well despite the short bite depth. It ...


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