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5

I've replace a few on decks and never had to remove all the planks because there was enough room underneath to get to the joist hangers. You should remove the screws from the planks going into a joist you want to replace. Then support the joist and remove the hanger from one end and the screws from the other hanger into the joist. Then lower and remove the ...


3

Those appear to be some sort of insect-related holes that were almost certainly there when the board was sawn. I'm sure they are long gone as the kiln-drying or other processing will kill any bugs in the wood.


3

The short answer is that it just isn't that critical. There will still be enough unpierced lap to provide weather resistance, and the sliver that cracks off the top edge usually doesn't result in a problem. In a rare case the wood grain angles down far enough that the crack shows, but that's not likely. Longer answers involve the need for wood siding to have ...


3

Another possibility is to drill out a 2” or 3” plug, then drill that plug with the 1” hole off centre. Then you can position the plug back in the original hole with the 1” hole as close to the edge as you wish, glue into place and fill to finish.


3

Various methods, the most accessible of which tends to be a long drill bit - 12-18" long, allowing the chuck to get out of the way. If you don't flex the bit, the slight angle (not quite perpendicular) is generally not a problem, but under the guise of "aircraft drills" there are very long bits with short flutes and a long smooth shank that ...


2

A: Drill some holes and bolt it. B: Straps (pipe hanger strapping) or brackets if you don't want to drill holes. C: The wooden approach to B: - surround the "foot parts" with 2x2's screwed into the platform, then screw or carriage bolt short sections of 2x2 or 2x4 over the metal foot parts into the 2x2's on either side to capture the foot parts.


2

First of all, congrats on taking up your first ever DIY project! It will be a rewarding experience. The more you do, the more you will learn and enrich your life, as well as being able to help those around you. For the wall option, you'd want to go into the studs, which you can find with a studfinder, or just watch a video on how to find them by knocking on ...


2

That framing will last decades with no maintenance. I just replaced the decking on my mother's 20-year-old pool deck which had not been well-maintained through the years. The framing was all in good shape though the decking was rotted and warped. With that said, if you want to wash it for cosmetic reasons, it won't hurt to do that.


2

I had three different pieces that I had rubbed with Danish oil and they looked beautiful! I wondered how I could have missed such a forgiving finish for so long. But they weren't drying after a week and I was getting worried. So I gave them a day in the direct sunlight at about 85 degrees and it baked the finish in and on the pieces. Problem solved!. I ...


2

Depends a lot on the specifics of the finish, but the most common finish, water-based polyurethane, does not create a fire hazard. Neither do other finishes, but some of them are mixed with solvents that make them easier to apply, which can be highly flammable. These solvents evaporate out, and won't be a fire hazard for long, but will be while applying. So ...


1

A lot of the small log recovery wood has come from trees that were killed by boring Beatles after the logs are debarked , rough cut and then finish planed they are sprayed with a biocide mostly to kill fungi but it also kills pest like beetles, ants and termites. I was told by the grader not to handle the wood after being sprayed because it takes time for ...


1

What is the best way to remove the glass? It looks like the glass is held in by 1/4-round wood molding, so I would do this: score the paint around the molding with a knife, both where it meets the glass and where it meets the door rabbet/rebate use a variety of small tools (e.g. small prybar, cat's paw, hammer, putty knife, etc.) to remove all molding ...


1

For small, not too deep pilot holes, you can just use a nail instead of a drill bit. Hammer it in and pull it out. The "pulling it out" part is the reason why it'll only work if the hole isn't too deep. I've also used Torx bit screws to make this kind of annoying pilot hole. With a bit of care, the torx bit will work even at a slight angle, ...


1

I installed three racks this way. We built 8x8 platforms with two layers of 3/4" plywood. The bottom layer was two 4x8 sheets oriented with the 8' side going left to right. The top layer was a 4x8 sheet in the middle going front to back, and another 4x8 sheet ripped into two 2' strips, one on the left, one on the right. This way there's no seam ...


1

With brackets 16" apart your lap joint would not need to be super strong. You could just use a good quality wood glue. Do all your cuts first and then glue the boards together and place on the brackets. Use an appropriate length screw from the underside of the bracket to secure the shelf to the bracket to keep if from moving around.


1

Are you replacing all of the treads? If so, can you tear out the old, rotten stringer so you don't need to sister in a new one? That would be best if the part of the stringer supporting some treads is beginning to fail. It will also make it easier to use a modern connector between the top of the stringer and the joist supporting the landing. If you can't ...


1

I think you have a nice project idea. The type of masonry anchors/screws you choose will be important. I recommend Tapcon screws long enough to use a washer, penetrate the wood/cleat, and go 1.5" into the wall. So that'll probably be 3" in total length. Get the recommended masonry drill bit when you purchase the screws; and install them ...


1

With the addition of the knee braces, the structure is considerably more stable now. Thanks to everyone for your input/advice. She's coming along nicely. Although, I'll never do this again. This is way more work than I'd ever imagined! LMAO.... I made a table and a bar and had the slab tiled. I think it came out pretty good all things considered. The ...


1

The vents you removed were constructed entirely of 1x2 lumber and could be easily recreated. You'd want to use cedar or pressure-treated lumber for rot-resistance, if not a synthetic. All cuts are square. Some corrosion-resistant screws, properly piloted and countersunk, would make them solid. Trim-head screws or splitless siding nails would secure them well....


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