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15

You are looking at tree sap. It's harmless. It's dried out so if it's gonna cause you to lose sleep at night, just scrape it off with a chisel.


6

Step 1: Properly size the support lumber What we see there looks like more than just swelling to me. It seems like someone jammed a full-thickness two-by in there out of haste. Swelling was just the final straw that caused rubbing. You'll need to remove it. Use a reciprocating saw (Sawzall) to cut any fasteners running through it, then pry it out. Then flex ...


6

That is tree sap. My Grandfather would call it Pitch. Pitch will clean very nicely with kerosene or a naptha product such as coleman fuel. It looks like it is dried out and it should not hurt anything unless you are trying to paint over it.


5

You have several challenges when adding many thousands of lbs. of weight to a roof system like that (which almost certainly wasn't designed with that use in mind): The ceiling joists aren't up to the task, as you know. The only real fix for this over a 24' span is to tie them to the rafters, which leads us to the next problem... The rafters are barely ...


3

You would do far better to put your access horizontally from the second floor of the house into the space above the garage. I honestly figured with so many double beams stretching across the garage, Cutting a single one couldn't possibly have any effect on the overall structure If they were not needed for the design, they would not be there.


3

You absolutely can. In the professional world that's the standard, in fact. Your drill can accept any round or hexagonal bit or driver up to 10mm in diameter. It's not fussy. Chucks don't vary between corded and cordless tools, generally speaking.


3

The wood looks like and probably is fir or pine. This is typical in many basements and transitional areas from house to garage for example where only a short stair is needed. It's hard to tell from the pic how long those stairs are. In any event, if you decide to replace them there are code requirements that need to be met. Although they vary somewhat by ...


2

Natural wood, even within a given species, can have a range of color tones. You can see this even in the old boards, none of which are exactly the same color. Some are more blonde, some are more grey, etc. White oak can turn pink shortly after milling. However, this color should have gone away long before the board was delivered as flooring. Red oak on the ...


2

I'd verify the threshold is level and if it's not note which side is higher. Remove the treated 2x underneath the threshold and check for level again. If the side that's binding is too high tapping it down with a hammer and a wood block on top of the high spot should at least enable the door to shut smoothly. Once the door functions properly you'll need to ...


2

That vertical member is a truss chord not a post. It’s in compression (as @SteveSh) has identified. It’s buckling due to an excessive vertical load (and probably because of a small defect in the wood). This phenomenon is identified in Euler’s Formula. While I don’t understand the formula, the concept we know it by is the “slenderness ratio”. That is to say, ...


2

It does not really matter or make much difference, so whichever is less expensive or more convenient. The main thing (regardless of size) is to compact it well. Put in 50mm, tamp (or ram) with a flat-ended rod or stick. Put in another 50mm and repeat. Most people get tempted to put in much more at a time, and the compaction suffers as a direct result, making ...


1

Thanks for all the fantastic effort attempting to identify the photographed fitting! I found that it's a bolt assembly, like those used in flat pack furniture. The holes at 90 deg are actually four, could only see two initially. They're in the bolt head and the metal box acts as a retention plate. If anyone is interested I can post an image of the bolt ...


1

After soaking the piece the wood fibers of the under the plastic will soften and become pliable. Rather than risking a wayward cut with a saw blade try removing the wood chips with a floor scraper or a paint scraper with a knob over the blade. lay the piece on a flat smooth surface while working. Hopefully most of the wood fibers will be scraped off, but ...


1

It may be a hot glue used, try a wet / damp towel and a hot iron to loosen it, but you will need to do so while it is extremely hot. Be careful. A broad putty knife may be handy for this. Picture courtesy Lowes This may not be an easy solution, while hot the laminate will be very weak and flimsy, let alone the hot glue may want to bond the laminate to the ...


1

You can try cleaning the grime off (thats some of the carpet pad impregnated with dirt), but ultimately you should refinish the wood floor. This involves a commercial sanding machine and other equipment not readily available. To clean try and scrape as much of the crud off as possible using a putty knife or a paint scraper. try not to gouge the wood or ...


1

You'd have to install some more supports to your framing in order to prevent damage to the existing framing members. I'd also suggest mounting the Heavy Bag as close to a wall as possible rather than mid-span. The ceiling joists will be carrying most of the weight and jolts. The ideal support would include a vertical supporting member under each joist and ...


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