Hot answers tagged

6

The idea of a true pilot hole is to physically remove the material from the wood so the body (aka 'minor diameter') of the screw doesn't have to expand the wood to make room for itself, possibly causing the wood to split. Click for larger image. Image courtesy of Home Stratosphere Using a nail to form a 'pilot hole' is simply going to expand, not remove, ...


6

Looks like dry wood termite droppings (frass) or pellets to me. Google termite droppings and you’ll see many pictures.


3

If you're doing the herringbone inside you won't use 1x8. You'll run 1x6 all the way out. This design probably ends up the thickness of a two-by (1-1/2"), so your front frame probably shouldn't be two-by. I'd use the same 1x6 for everything (tongue-and-groove for the herringbone, square boards for the frame). If you don't use tongue-and-groove for the ...


3

Adding an answer because I happened to see a video on this which has a thoughtful and detailed analysis of why wood cutting / carving with an angle grinder can be so dangerous. The video also has a "caught on video" moment of such an accident (no real gory details). IMO visualizing such an accident is very healthy mental preparation for this tool (or ...


2

No it's not safe at all. I would usually be a safe operator of power tools and all that but recently had an accident using one for the first time which resulted in my getting a deep wound just above my right pelvis. My heavy jacket took most abuse for me (saved me really) but the blade still struck into the side of me and I spent the night in hospital. I was ...


2

I built a drill guide jig for this. The basic concept is to secure a piece of pipe with an inside diameter just slightly larger than the auger bit. My use case was a timber frame outdoor kitchen with exposed joinery. Peg holes were 1" diameter going through 8" timbers. The jig was time-consuming to use but very accurate. Pics and YouTube video below. ...


2

Regarding arrangement of artificial logs... Most kits come with a diagram showing the intended arrangement, and they're designed to fit a particular burner. If you don't have that, just be sure that you're not completely blocking any ports on the burner. Otherwise it's mostly a matter of decorative preference.


2

Real wood goes black as well - products of combustion commonly called soot. If the device is set properly then there will be some, but if there seems to be a lot then get the device checked.


2

I'm fairly sure it's termites. They are soft-bodied, so they don't like to be exposed to the air, as they dehydrate, so they typically stay within the wood, and eat away at the softer spring growth rings in softer woods including pine. When they run short of material they'll explore for more, and to do so, they build tunnels along the surface that protects ...


1

I'm not sure what "chipboard" is, but your plan is ok if you use a structural sheet material (OSB or plywood). The span across the wall void is wide enough that you should find a way to support the sheet at the far side, though, or it's likely to flex a fair bit.


1

Knot stains happen when the sap of real wood transfers through the paint. Knots are full of sap, and don't fully dry out when the boards are processed. This can't happen with drywall. What does commonly transfer through drywall is water, and I would guess that what you have here is a water stain. It could be a leaky pipe fitting, or it could be ...


1

I've had great results using Citristrip, (see below). I've used it indoors many times and it leaves no fumes. I've used it to strip multiple layers of paint and varnish from furniture. There are many products to choose from but I know this one works. It just goes on with a brush. Good luck, you took on a big job redoing a staircase. This product looks ...


1

Throw rugs will work but you'll probably end up wanting to sand and fix it right. If you do wall to wall make sure to use padding.


1

Simply, a bolt is not relying on the holding strength of the threads in wood fiber. It is a metal-to-metal sandwich that is holding boards together from both sides. A bolt connection will normally be stronger than a lag screw, but that increased strength is often not needed, and access to both sides of the joint is not always possible. If there is any ...


1

Looks like 2 X 6 on 48" centers , primarily they hold the walls from bowing out, not for supporting weight. I suggest what I did for the same construction : add 2 X 6 between so it will be 24" centers. That will hold modest weight like your wheels .


1

There is very little bracing under the loft floor. It may need to be framed in more to support the weight of stored items. Tires are not that heavy, but you definitely want it to be strong enough to carry the weight of a person safely. Objects falling from that height could definitely result in personal injury, or even death. If you are unsure how to ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible