Hot answers tagged

6

Barring very unusual circumstances, they are more likely to shrink from the "as installed" state than expand from it. If they do expand, the small and sloped contact area works in your favor.


2

That crack looks fine to me. From the image it looks to be mostly superficial... I might drill a pilot hole if the screw is going dead center where the crack is, just to make sure the crack doesn't widen. If you want to err on the safe side, you can get another 2x4 stud and nail it to the side of the existing, cracked stud (this is called sistering) with ...


2

Of course the splits (“checks”) will affect the performance AND strength of the wood. Wood is a product of nature, it’s not manufactured so there will be imperfections in the wood. Wood shrinks more “across” the grain rather than than the length of the grain. So you are seeing the checks developing in each piece of wood. Your wood is to be used for deck ...


2

Glass is heavy and many wood doors are not constructed to bear the weight of the glass. You should look into using Plexiglass. It's third of the weight of glass and most home stores will cut it to size. You'll have to buy the whole sheet. Try to remove the panel molding off one side of your door and then remove the panel. Get an exact measurement for the ...


2

As pointed out by the others, I think it is wise to provide vapor barrier and insulation for your region's concern. THe supplier shall have recommended the method of installation, concerning gap between boards, and naling vs screwing. The recommendation below is directly copied from the linked article FYI use, https://www.workshopcompanion.com/KnowHow/Design/...


2

Normally, you'd want to use any type of straight 2"x 8" planks. Why 8" instead of 6"? Because the 6" is really about 5.5" and if plans call for 6" slab, the 6" planks would be too small. You'll have to trench a little to get the planks down to 6" above grade. You'll want to get some rebar and drive it in every 3 ...


2

See this very relevant answer for details of what to do to disassemble/reassemble the door. You'll have to go through a similar process but without being able to cut the door apart, since you don't want to dispose of the bottom panel. Disassembling the door, especially since that appears (based on the door nob) to be an old door, is going to be rather ...


1

That bench is beyond economical repair, or practical, repair. If all the rotten wood were cut out the hole would probably be three times larger. As a band-aid get a scrap of Formica sheet (or similar kitchen laminate) and fix it to the surface with duct tape. the tape may need to be renewed every week.


1

The best way is to buy a new door. Or a used door (you may have to cut it to fit).


1

From what I can see, it looks to be in pretty good shape. You want to start out by getting a deck wash from your home store and applying it according to instructions. You usually spray it on with a garden sprayer and then pressure clean it off. Stick to setting the pressure cleaner at around 1800 PSI, 2000 max. More than that and you can damage the wood. ...


1

If you can find charcoal gray vinyl siding, that would work. Use a table saw or router table to trim away the stepped part that you don't need, which will leave a long narrow strip in the width you want. Even tin snips could work if you have a steady hand. Gray vinyl siding won't need to be painted or re-painted and won't fade appreciably even in desert sun.


1

Fabric. You already have that beige fabric up. It is already attached to the wood. Go back to wherever you got the beige fabric and get some in gray. Fold the edges under to make a strip the width of the wood underneath. Attach the strip to the wood with staples or upholstery nails or whatever you used for the beige fabric. Of course there will be a ...


1

That's called "checking", and it's what happens when wood dries out. Always. It's why wood used for exterior purposes should be sealed fairly readily. It's not usually a structural concern as it's parallel to the grain and the strength axis. You'll want to cull (trim away) any wood that you don't consider aesthetically appealing, do your ...


1

I don't think the intent should be to separate wood and concrete. I think that applies to encased wood such as in footings where concrete retains moisture for some time. Wood and concrete are used together all the time. In your case its just wood on a flat surface but it doesn't really do much as it is a flat surface so water will sit there. The plastic ...


1

Yes, that's exactly what you want to do. I've found that drilling holes, 1/2" since your wood is that thick, into the piece of wood can break it lose and make it easier to remove. Get as much out as possible and then fill in with your Quikrete.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible