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2

The lard will work fine. The laminated wood would give you smoother sides and bottom.


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Since it will be covered it won’t rot away but it will turn gray. I also live in the Pacific Northwest south of you , condensation is the biggest issue I see and occasional condensation is not a problem. My riding arena 120’ with poly the entire length for light it is 30 + years old with no issues but is 22’ up so the color is far enough away we don’t ...


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I would make a cut with a circular saw set to the thickness of the boards all the way around the room, as close as the saw allows to the wall. I'd then fit 3/4" plywood inside the cut, adding framing below where necessary to support the edge well. I'd then overlay 1/2" plywood wall-to-wall, with construction adhesive between it and the old boards. Screw it ...


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You'll want to use vegetable shortening, not lard. It will be a lot cheaper unless you have local market conditions that create a glut of pig's fat. Where I come from, you have to go to an artisan grocery to even get lard. The cheapest hydrogenated vegetable shortening is fine for this, but don't eat it because there are health issues with it. For ...


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An alternative to the answer given by jack is to cut away and replace the wood that is rotten and apply a weatherproof paint. This is only suitable though, if the shed has a slightly raised concrete base. The soil to the left will definitely need to be dug away and removed so the soil level is below the bottom of the shed.if the neighbouring ground is ...


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You want to fix this, it will only get worse. You only have to replace the wood that's rotten but make sure you get it all. Cut out the rotten wood and square off the remaining strips. Frame some concrete backer board, wonder board, where the rotten wood was. Finish off the job with some stucco over the backer board and texture it similar to the wood grain. ...


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To long for a comment. I have used router bits & shapers to make both the tongue & grooves in larger boards that we cut down to match the width on Victorian homes. Even with a complete refinish a pro can see the difference because the grain is not as tight maybe only 50% of the original but most folks don’t see it if they do they don’t realize what ...


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I've been thinking about this since yesterday. There are all kinds of transition pieces for floors that allow for expansion but they all have a slight overlap and thus are raised from the floor, like the one I've shown below. If this is in the middle of a room it stands out like a sore thumb. I'm guessing you want a transition that's flush so if I was doing ...


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If it's outside, I'd say it's more than likely some kind of varnish. I think you'd need a "chemical stripper" (there are "green" ones these days: https://www.homedepot.com/p/EZ-Strip-32-oz-Paint-and-Varnish-Stripper-ESA-700/205725398). The equation is basically: Remove shellac with alcohol Remove lacquer with lacquer thinner Remove everything else with ...


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Is it ... practical ... to wax urethane? Well, it can be done. You would be ill-advised to do so before the urethane fully cures. My stuff wants 30 days, but yours is surely 1-part urethane which cures via reaction with air or moisture, so I'd give it a few months. My concern is, I don't see how much good it will do. Obviously you're very attached to ...


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