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43

I'm not familiar with USA house construction methods (I live in the UK) but speaking as a mechanical engineer, I wouldn't even stand near that thing while debating how safe it was. That bolt is presumably supposed to be fixing the post against it popping out sideways. I suppose it was meant to be bolted to a metal beam underneath the concrete. So either ...


24

This should make the hairs on your neck stand-up. What my first thought was is the sand fill that the concrete was floated on has been undermined. Is there a sump pump well in the basement? And if so, do you live in an area that gets a lot of rain? Also, what's missing from that photo ( that hasn't been installed) is a concrete footing of some sort to ...


20

That's the worst job I've ever seen at installing quarter round. As others have said, your installer was incredibly lazy. There are several different techniques that could be used for terminating the corner rounds in both the corners and at the ends. A simple 45° miter is the simplest for both inside and outside corners. If you want to get fancy, you can ...


20

Looks like schluter ditra waterproofing membrane. Amazon describes it: This universal underlayment specifically designed for ceramic and stone tile eliminates the main cause of cracking in your tile installation. Tile and stone are rigid materials and are, therefore, sensitive to stresses originating in the sub floor. This uncoupling membrane allows ...


16

With these types of tiles you do not want them to break as they are harder to demo when they are in bits and shards. If you try to use a scraper (even power) what inevitably ends up happening is the top of the tile comes off, leaving the much harder to remove bottom on. Also this method severely damages the subfloor, sometimes to the point that you will ...


16

One way to raise the floor, and possibly the most reasonable cost wise, is to install what I would call sleeper joists sitting the top of the existing subfloor and than add new subfloor covering over those. These "sleeper joists" would be installed as 2xX material on edge. This could be 2x6 planks spaced 16" apart. It may be necessary to rip the 2x6 planks ...


15

Exceptionally unprofessional work. The quarter rounds should be mitered together at a minimum. They're not even touching at all in your second and third pictures. It's just cosmetic, though. Not gonna hurt anything except your aesthetic preferences.


14

In a basement, galvanized pipe like that could have been a pipe feeding oil from an underground tank to an oil heater that has long ago been removed and replaced with something else. I had one like that and figured it out by looking at where an old chimney had been removed by looking at the sub-floor structures made to accommodate it. I didn't know exactly ...


13

Most refrigerators have adjustable feet that can be "unscrewed" in order to level the fridge. All you need to do is "unscrew" these feet until the wheels are slightly off the floor.


13

Definitely get a home inspector to look over tbe place; there may be other damage from this subsidence... If the price is attractive enough that you'd consider trying to have this redone properly, I'd suggest getting an engineer who know the local soil and hydrology to look at it and tell you what it'd cost to redo this properly. Better to spend a few ...


13

Any information you'd glean from this discussion is untrustworthy for the following reasons: No photos. They often reveal issues not mentioned in your short description. No dimensions. In engineering, dimensions are key. No information about construction era or age. That would tell us a lot about common building techniques. No liability. Anyone telling ...


13

I'd try scraping before sanding, using a razor blade scraper or a furniture scraper -- a slightly more targeted tool.


11

I've got both types of sanders and I use the belt sander when there is a lot of wood to be removed and the orbital sander when the amount of wood to be removed is small. You have a little better control with the orbital sander. With the belt sander, it's easy to put some pretty deep grooves in your work before you know it. I'd go with the orbital sander.


11

This could be: water waste gas oil for furnace radon system remnants (unlikely) but the earlier ones used metal pipes other The picture is pretty clear, this pipe was installed when they poured the foundation. It does something. You are going to have to open that cap and smell and possibly stick something in there so you can see whats further in. ...


10

What about rubber furniture cups? If they are not deep enough, you could cut a channel in the center to set the fridge leg/wheel deeper.


9

Looking at different images may help you determine the species. Keep in mind I'm not a wood expert, and wood being a natural material will vary widely. Oak Oak tends to have a bold tight grain Ash Ash tends to have a bold semi-tight grain. Hickory Hickory tends to have a more subtle longer grain. Maple Maple tends to have a subtle semi-tight grain. ...


9

If your gut is telling you to run then run. But if you are still thinking about purchasing the house I would make sure that the builder gives you something in writing to back up what he/she is saying. If they are wiling to put it in writing then all is good, as long as they can be found if something does go wrong. Also ask the builder for the compaction ...


8

If they'll accept a full-size model, use the technique for making a template for cutting vinyl flooring to the right size and shape (taken from another answer of mine): ... I use a roll of craft paper and sticky tape to make a template of the room. Start in the center of the room, lightly stick a strip to the ground, and cut it at the edges of the room. ...


8

Adding hydronic radiant floor heating is a lot more complicated than you could imagine. To do a system for a bathroom running off of a domestic water tank, in operation for potable water requires all potable water components. Potable water components are expensive. This is the simplest picture I could find and it still doesn't technically apply to youwww....


8

I have galvanized natural gas pipe in my 1950 Metro Detroit house. If it's not oil, it could be gas going to the original furnace location. I can see a bright spot in the floor where something stood for a while. It's common to have the furnace in the middle of the house so the heat is distributed evenly. Removing the cap and smelling is probably your best ...


7

You shouldn't be able to damage a concrete floor by jumping up and down on it. There will be sound transmission (as you've noticed) and there might be some movement in the floor if it's not properly tied into the walls. This would be more likely with a wooden floor supported by joists as there is more natural movement in wood than concrete. If there is ...


7

Just don't. This is clearly the best answer. If you really want to cheap out perhaps you could buy a complete kit with just one square foot mat, analyze the wire used, and try to source a designated radiant wire of similar dimension and resistance. Then fold and spindle that in a similar way to the mat squares. Remember your fire insurance likely excludes ...


7

Easy, cheap option would be to use shims. These are most often used to plumb door jambs, but of course have a ton of uses in construction. Once you put them in and figure out how far they have to go, mark them and then you can take them out and cut off the excess (either with a hand saw or by scoring with a knife).


7

A typical toilet has a flange that's bolted to the floor and stays there. Bolts are then turn upside down, with the head down, and the toilet sits on these. The threaded end faces up and the nut goes onto it. So, a typical toilet install is closet bolts that have threads facing up. No need to go under the floor, be it a 3rd floor bathroom, a 1st floor ...


7

I agree with ILikeDirt; This installation is awful. I think the best thing to do is to remove all of the quarter round around the cabinets. To fill the gaps, try to use a sanded caulk that is roughly the same color as your grout. It should setup fine and stay looking good for a number of years. One thing you will want to make sure to do is tape off the area ...


7

What's done is done. I'd grout and generally move on with life, and only revisit it if and when the tiles start popping on their own, which may never happen. You are NOT a professional tile installer who would be well advised to rip out and do it over for the sake of their reputation. So you don't need to act like one.


7

A good ol' scrap block of two-by does nicely. Just set your laser 1-1/2" above your slab height and kick the block around as you work. This doesn't work for ceilings, of course, but hopefully you have fewer points to measure in that case. You'd have to use something with a suction cup or magnet otherwise.


7

That's actually the way one normally does such things, and has been since before there were lasers, other than one normally uses a rod rather than a tape for more consistent results. You establish a reference plane (Generally not going to any great lengths to try and get it super-close to the surface you are working), measure in a grid, and mark high spots ...


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