Hot answers tagged

43

I'm not familiar with USA house construction methods (I live in the UK) but speaking as a mechanical engineer, I wouldn't even stand near that thing while debating how safe it was. That bolt is presumably supposed to be fixing the post against it popping out sideways. I suppose it was meant to be bolted to a metal beam underneath the concrete. So either ...


24

This should make the hairs on your neck stand-up. What my first thought was is the sand fill that the concrete was floated on has been undermined. Is there a sump pump well in the basement? And if so, do you live in an area that gets a lot of rain? Also, what's missing from that photo ( that hasn't been installed) is a concrete footing of some sort to ...


20

That's the worst job I've ever seen at installing quarter round. As others have said, your installer was incredibly lazy. There are several different techniques that could be used for terminating the corner rounds in both the corners and at the ends. A simple 45° miter is the simplest for both inside and outside corners. If you want to get fancy, you can ...


20

Looks like schluter ditra waterproofing membrane. Amazon describes it: This universal underlayment specifically designed for ceramic and stone tile eliminates the main cause of cracking in your tile installation. Tile and stone are rigid materials and are, therefore, sensitive to stresses originating in the sub floor. This uncoupling membrane allows ...


16

With these types of tiles you do not want them to break as they are harder to demo when they are in bits and shards. If you try to use a scraper (even power) what inevitably ends up happening is the top of the tile comes off, leaving the much harder to remove bottom on. Also this method severely damages the subfloor, sometimes to the point that you will ...


15

Exceptionally unprofessional work. The quarter rounds should be mitered together at a minimum. They're not even touching at all in your second and third pictures. It's just cosmetic, though. Not gonna hurt anything except your aesthetic preferences.


14

If the condition has developed over time, you can try tightening all of the screws on the hinges. If any of the screws keep turning then you can replace them with longer screws so that they grip the stud behind the frame and pull the door up. If you recently installed carpet or a new floor then you will need to plane the bottom of the door with either a ...


13

I prefer working from under the floor when possible. Although it is easier to screw loose flooring down from the top, it is often difficult to fill the holes and make the color and finish match. Using the top down method is a last resort, especially if you have a large area to secure. The Counter Snap screws mentioned in the previous answer are great devices,...


13

Definitely get a home inspector to look over tbe place; there may be other damage from this subsidence... If the price is attractive enough that you'd consider trying to have this redone properly, I'd suggest getting an engineer who know the local soil and hydrology to look at it and tell you what it'd cost to redo this properly. Better to spend a few ...


13

Any information you'd glean from this discussion is untrustworthy for the following reasons: No photos. They often reveal issues not mentioned in your short description. No dimensions. In engineering, dimensions are key. No information about construction era or age. That would tell us a lot about common building techniques. No liability. Anyone telling ...


13

I'd try scraping before sanding, using a razor blade scraper or a furniture scraper -- a slightly more targeted tool.


12

Sub Floor Sub floor material can depend on what type of floor is going to be installed on top of it, and the joist spacing. Typically if the joists are 16" on center (OC) or less, you can use 5/8" tongue and groove plywood glued and screwed to the joists. larger joist spacing calls for 3/4" tongue and groove plywood, again glued and screwed to the joists. ...


12

Most refrigerators have adjustable feet that can be "unscrewed" in order to level the fridge. All you need to do is "unscrew" these feet until the wheels are slightly off the floor.


10

You likely need flat, not level. And for that, all you really need is some sort of a long, straight edge. A yard stick works pretty well ... just place it down anywhere you think there might be a dip or bump, and if the yard stick is flat against the floor its whole length, you're fine. As for the implications of not having it flat, I'm not sure for ...


10

Well it depends on the output of the radiant floor, but in general yes they are sufficient to heat a room. We have underfloor heating (hot water with heat spreader plates under floorboards) in our upstairs rooms and they warm the rooms quite well. The floors are warm to touch (as would be expected). The temperature of the room is more uniform the heat is ...


10

What about rubber furniture cups? If they are not deep enough, you could cut a channel in the center to set the fridge leg/wheel deeper.


9

The main cause of wood floors squeaking is wood shrinkage around the nails. If you can localize the areas that are the worst, a common way to minimize squeaks is to drive screws up from the bottom through the subfloor into the hardwood. Be absolutely sure to use screws that are long enough to grab the hardwood, but short enough not to stick through. If you ...


9

The floor doesn't have to be completely flat as long as any bumps or hollows are relatively shallow (like rolling hills rather than mountain peaks and valleys). If there are gaps or ridges in the floor then this will create areas where the linoleum will wear more than the rest of the floor. This is because there will be movement of the linoleum where it can ...


9

Looking at different images may help you determine the species. Keep in mind I'm not a wood expert, and wood being a natural material will vary widely. Oak Oak tends to have a bold tight grain Ash Ash tends to have a bold semi-tight grain. Hickory Hickory tends to have a more subtle longer grain. Maple Maple tends to have a subtle semi-tight grain. ...


9

If your gut is telling you to run then run. But if you are still thinking about purchasing the house I would make sure that the builder gives you something in writing to back up what he/she is saying. If they are wiling to put it in writing then all is good, as long as they can be found if something does go wrong. Also ask the builder for the compaction ...


8

I have used "Counter-Snap" through vinyl and carpet, and it worked great. All it takes is to locate the squeak, insert the patented “snap off” screw into the fixture, drill it down and let it snap off.


8

Drywall screws are for drywall any other use and the heads tends to snap off. Wood screws are what you are after. Also, be careful, if you have an old floor it is NOT 3/4 anymore because of shrinkage due to drying out and from resurfacing. Same for the sub floor, it is not 3/4 anymore especially since they are probably pine. I would not go up through the ...


8

If they'll accept a full-size model, use the technique for making a template for cutting vinyl flooring to the right size and shape (taken from another answer of mine): ... I use a roll of craft paper and sticky tape to make a template of the room. Start in the center of the room, lightly stick a strip to the ground, and cut it at the edges of the room. ...


8

Adding hydronic radiant floor heating is a lot more complicated than you could imagine. To do a system for a bathroom running off of a domestic water tank, in operation for potable water requires all potable water components. Potable water components are expensive. This is the simplest picture I could find and it still doesn't technically apply to youwww....


7

Yes, but. There are so many issues with putting wood flooring at or below grade that I never like to see it done. The main issues are that wood swells with humidity, and humidity varies with seasons and other situations like rainfall. Most people think that their foundations are moisture-proof, but that is absolutely untrue with any masonry product, ...


7

Smaller tiles are less likely to crack on the tile itself, the joints will give first. But larger tiles are stronger in general. That said, you should work on increasing the strength of your floor before tiling if you are concerned about cracking. If you can access the joists, sister any weak places between two load bearing points. On the floor itself, ...


7

I suspect the previous answer will rarely apply to the problem as reported by OP. Most likely the floor isn't "solid" hardwood (ie - it's probably not 2-3cm thick floorboards laid directly over joists that have sagged). I've often seen what OP describes on "click-lock" flooring, where interlocking 6-10mm thick panels are used to "tile" the area. The panels ...


7

There are small radiant heat mats commonly used under tile in bathrooms. These are electric and can be thermostatically controlled. They are safe to use under carpet and thin type wood flooring. The mats are apx 30inches by 15 inches and can be connected together to cover the desired area. Both the heater mats and controllers are avail at the home ...


7

You need to see if you can first remove the dirt. The depth of the footers will determine that. If you can remove dirt, you'd want to remove enough dirt so that you can put down a gravel base, compact it, then pour a new slab. If you can't remove the dirt, you might be able to pour a raised concrete slab. If you want to go super-cheap, lay down and seal a ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible