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4

Experiment elsewhere on the wall first. I have once seen paint come off wood gently with repeated applications of limonene. This was as the result of a spray bottle being left open, as it heated and cooled a little would come out.


4

"Look nice" is a highly subjective criterion. One approach to that sort of junction is to scribe a trim board. One tacks a trim board in a vertical position touching the stone, and then sets a compass or pair of dividers equal to the largest gap between the stone and the board. The compass or dividers are then used to follow the irregular stone ...


4

I would select non-flammable insulating materials such as rock-wool, or fiberglass (fully puffed up; mashing it badly hurts its performance). To use these, you will need some sort of framing to hold it up. It can't just be taped to a wall. It's not out of the question to frame a room inside a rental house; I've seen it done. However this is the wrong year ...


3

I use an air chicle with a wide blade but a hammer and wide chisel will work. Start at a grout line and hold the chisel at a 45, one or 2 good wacks and you will be to the base lay the chisel as flat as you can maybe 30 degrees for the first one and many times a good sharp wack will pop the stone in some cases it will shatter after a few adjustments of your ...


3

Sounds like a pretty standard repointing job, other than the location - rake, chisel (or "grout-saw") out all the loose/deteriorated mortar to some convenient depth, wet the joints, pack in new mortar (keep it damp so that it cures, rather than drying out) and tool the surface. You'll find more information in general on "repointing brick" ...


3

As you have found out there needs to solid structure in the wall behind the drywall, I.E. a stud. Typically these are mounted in doorways that have solid structure and i am not sure where you are mounting yours. A stud in a wall is only 1 1/2" ( " = inch ) wide so the bar would need to be perfectly center, but even if centered the whole width of ...


2

While they may work for a table that is shallow, not cantilevered off of the wall very far, it really is not the appropriate hardware for the job. Assuming you fasten the shelving standards to the brick wall with the appropriate fasteners, i feel the week link in this plan is the little tabs on the back of the bracket that hold the bracket to the standard. I ...


2

Use a resin or hard setting product and make sure the holes are dust free. Worked well for me, either reusing those holes or having to drill a new hole part through the wall of the repair.


2

There is a radiant heat device which heats up the substrate the paint is attached to and causes it to bubble off. Doing it that way might allow the paint to be remove without removing the paint. I think the device goes for ~$600 so depends on your budget but I'd setup a test and do what you think happened in the room. There are likely more expensive ...


2

If this were 1/2" plywood, I would have no concerns at all. With 1/4", it is a bit iffy. The plywood itself is relatively strong, particularly sandwiched between drywall and studs. The concern I have is whether the screws in the plywood have enough depth to grip well. What would definitely work, if there is enough space behind the drywall/plywood, ...


2

Of course you can remove the upper part of that wall by: Scoring the drywall on the finished side where you want the cut to be. Removing the drywall from the top portion taking care not to pull off any below the score line. Cutting the studs along that line and removing the top portion of each one. Place some top plate on top of the remaining studs to tie ...


2

Command strips "cord bundlers" and a nice hunk of decoy fake Ivy or other imitation vining plant (unless there's enough light and willingness to care for to use a real plant - unlikely.) Alternatively, fairy lights, etc. Basically, it will be in plain sight any way you slice it, so might as well just make it disappear by having something more ...


1

One typical solution is cable staples: Yes, each one has a nail. The main part is white, so assuming the apartment has typical neutral white or off-white walls they should look OK (or as good as you're going to get under the circumstances). Yes, each one has a nail. Most apartments will allow for small nail holes for picture hanging and things of that sort, ...


1

With the understanding that this is a temporary fix for cosmetic purposes only designed to last a year or two until the wall is demolished as part of an upcoming remodeling... I'd recommend just simply painting over it. It appears from the close up picture that there's some texture in the white spots, so I'd think that if you matched the paint color and ...


1

First, you must address the cause of the separation/bubbling or it will happen again after you repair. Damage like this is typically caused by moisture, which could be caused by a leak, improper ventilation, insulation gap or improper moisture barrier and is likely on the inside of that wall. This doesn't look like a basement concrete wall but moisture is ...


1

You are not sure if the header above the doorway or the corner to the right of the doorway is load bearing. I have added yellow highlights to each of these. Really there are only two ways to know for sure. Take off the drywall at both spots and take pictures of right above them in the attic and let us inspect. Get blueprints of the house to an engineer ...


1

Don't build a river I'm not a fan of scribe-fitting to extremely irregular surfaces like this. Even if you do a great job it'll look like a child drew a river down the wall. You simply can't get it to look "professional", and it'll draw the eye to the unfortunate situation more so than now. Ideally the stone wall would've been fit to the wooden ...


1

That whole section of drywall should be cut out and the inside of the wall inspected for more damage/mold. If it's an exterior wall or if there's insulation in there, it should be removed too. Then you need to clean the area with a mold killer. I have used vinegar because it kills surface mold and gets in to kill the roots. Once all that's done, then replace ...


1

That section of the wall must be cut out. The drywall and plaster and then behind it must be cleaned. You would cut out about 12" over the molded area. I see mold too next to it. Fans help having a huge mold issue. If you have a flood and standing water fans are not the fix though. They just keep the issue from getting out of control.


1

Moisture on below grade walls is common. The lucky thing for you there is not much depth there IF it becomes a problem. Normally we put foundation drains in to drain the water away. This may not have been done since it’s not very deep. If it becomes a problem it is fairly easy to put drains in or you may be able to have it done as part of the purchase.


1

That's a light enough object that standard hollow-wall anchors (plastic plugs) should work fine. They'll do the job whether or not you hit a portion of the breeze block behind the wallboard. Carefully locate the mounting points on the wall. Drill for your plugs--usually 1/4" or 5/16". Note that hitting the block will severely dull your bit. You ...


1

A drywall J-bead or tear-away bead will give a clean look when butting drywall against wood or brick.


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