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4

It looks like drywall dust. There were probably cuts made with a rotary tool which left dust inside the wall, and now it's working out, possibly due to air pressure in the wall from an HVAC duct or just environmental air surges. I'd run a strong vacuum sealed against the joint with rags. That should pull most of it out, though you'll still probably see ...


3

In my opinion, that should not be cut. It appears to be a structural part of the house. There will be others like that in the wall, at least 1 more, and if the wall is over 20' it will most likely have an extra one, 3 total. That was code minimum back in the day, and probably still is. There is a chance that nothing would ever happen bad if it was cut, but ...


3

Gaps around windows are common (there's a reason why they're called "rough-in"). As long as the gaps aren't larger than the trim, you're fine. Oddly enough, the old trim looks like it was attached to the window. That would explain the gap (it wasn't visible from the inside). The unusual thing here is the size. Expanding foam is your friend here, but be sure ...


2

No, the walls around the bar and closet do not appear to be load bearing walls, except I would not remove the North-South wall between the Kitchen and Lounge. The dashed lines on the Ground Floor Plan indicate the structural floor framing for the the First Floor Plan (above). As you can see, a steel beam has been added just South of the Bar area and ...


1

If you use a circular saw a straight pair of lines can be cut. Then a simple wood chisel with a sharp whack will remove the block to make your channel. Steel nail plates used for electrical will protect where the lines are trapped by the studs. In between the studs push the line set back an inch so distance will be protecting it if you run the line set with ...


1

Google "removable wall panel system" for lots of options


1

Since this is a utility area and, presumably, it doesn't have to look all that pretty, you could screw up plywood or OSB as a wall covering to protect the wiring and insulation. Paint it white or "builder's beige" to make it look a bit nicer, then, when you need to make changes, you can easily unscrew it. After the work's complete, put it right back up using ...


1

Are those in a wall, I think they look like small holes like tacks, or push pins I guess my grand kids even have posters on the ceiling not only walls. I have seen a lot of termite and carpenter ant damage and it is in wood not Sheetrock or plaster. I sometimes use the small steel pins that have brass hooks . OOK has 1 pin to 4 pin hooks in the style I ...


1

Your primary concern will be that you're putting a hole into the outside of your house that will let water (and bugs and, possibly other things) into your house. Therefore, it is critical that you ensure that when you're done, the hole is water tight. Water leaking into the wall, especially if it's a wood-framed house will lead to rotting out the sill and ...


1

I would not be going 4’ deep. For a small wall like that I would want a wider footing 16” sounds good but would go 18”deep max , I don’t see any way for there to be hydraulic issues that may require a deeper footing. I would have rebar in every other hole and back fill them all with concrete. On the back side I would lay a drain in a sock at the footing or ...


1

paint the plywood before you install it, and afterwards paint the nails. You can probably paint the nails with a small roller on an extension handle instead of using the ladder. Consider using fibre-cement (eg Hardieflex) instead of plywood.


1

Trusses are self-supporting. So if what you're showing in the first photo is indeed the bottom span of a truss, and it's supported on both ends, then no, that is not a load bearing wall. If there is any doubt, however, please consult with a structural engineer.


1

While I'm not an expert, typically you can pull up slates, re-level the sand underneath them, and then re-lay them. It is entirely possible that the slates were put on too-thin a layer of gravel and sand, and that the underlying soil has compressed a bit since they were laid. This is different from erosion. It is also possible that they were laid in order ...


1

You could possibly use a wall mounted toilet and snake the drain from the base of the wall drain to the floor drain.


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