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27

It'll be fine if everything else is fine The #1 issue with cordage inside walls is thermal - cordage is permitted smaller wires because it's in the open air in a habitable room, where a human will notice wire problems... not packed in the wall where air cannot circulate and where it may be subject to 150F heat from solar gain. But the sound bar draws, what......


20

Since your house is the vintage it is Old houses, like yours, that predate modern lumber dimensioning often can't use stud shoes, as you discovered. Since you're in that boat, you can try nailing a 8-10" piece of 2x blocking that's been notched to go around the pipe to the studs in question (this was what was done to reinforce the studs that were ...


17

There's whats safe, and then there's what has been tested, tested, and tested again to the point it has building codes written about it to be safe. Is there any real danger running an extension cord through the wall? No, 99% of the time there's no issue and will never cause a problem. But then again, a lot of building codes deal with that 1% so avoidable ...


8

It's primarily about the insulation - IIRC, mostly about the flame-spread characterization of the insulation - thus, even non-power cables are different for "in-wall" and "not in-wall" applications, because if the characteristics of the outer insulation layer.


3

Yes, there are several ways to frame your wall and it starts with your roof and goes down to the footing. We design from the top down and build from the bottom up. The building inspector is there to help insure you house does not collapse killing family, guests or visitors. Framing your wall is the process of transferring all the loads through the wall and ...


2

I'm guessing that this is a shear wall, or that the wall wasn't originally finished with drywall and required at least some diagonal bracing because it's load-bearing. For that reason I wouldn't completely strip it, but you should be fine doing as you are and removing the bottom 16" or whatever. You may be required (or wise) to float blocking behind ...


1

You'll want to remove any crumbling plaster. There's probably lath strips up there so just mix up some plaster and fill in the area. Any gouges in the ceiling can be filled in with plaster. I'd be against using any type of glue mixture to stabilize crumbling plaster. You wouldn't then be able to sand it smooth and paint probably wouldn't stick to it. That's ...


1

I would wonder why the original builder built it that way. Perhaps there is something under the platform that could not be moved: foundation, load-bearing element, etc. If there is nothing there and an engineer says the stairs can be moved, that might be a good solution. However, if moving the stairs becomes not an option due to what is under the platform, I ...


1

One alternative would be to ditch the square corner with protective corner bead and simply do a rounded corner in plaster*. If this matches the design aesthetic of the house, it is a perfectly acceptable solution, and I lived in 2 different rental houses (while in college) that used this on interior doorways. It's my belief that there's a good chance that ...


1

I believe freeman has it backwards. The screws in line are for attaching to the studs. The 2 at the top create the strength or ability to resist pullout While also in conjunction with the 3rd provide the lateral support to handle the weight. The offset spacing would be to hold the shelf board / plank in place. I have put up many homes shelving this way and ...


1

The side in the top pic has the two holes closer together and centered. This is the "up" side - the shelf will sit on this. The side in the bottom pic has them offset and farther apart, this is the wall side. On the shelf side, they're closer together because these are simply to keep the shelf from slipping off the bracket and to tie the brackets ...


1

On the one hand, the bigger it is - by combining the bookcases together - the less likely to actually tip, the danger if it ever does tip is much greater because one it starts tipping you (or a small child) will be fighting against the combined weight of all the bookcases with all the books. All you need are a few screws into studs. Even with old plaster and ...


1

Did you ever resolve this? Did you figure out the issue and fix it? An 1886 basement is probably constructed from natural stone. Is it? Is there any unfinished exterior wall in the basement that you can see? The stone itself is porous and the pointing, unless it has been redone recently, is also usually leaky in a basement this age. In heavy rain, or ...


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