Hot answers tagged

71

What about trimming the roller shade? Most shades are meant to be trimmed, since manufacturers can't make every single size. See if you can pop off one of the ends, and then cut the rolled-up shade with a utility knife or something similar.


36

Paper towels and glue are both relatively weak. The best thing is wood plus glue. Fortunately most of us have some right sized pieces of wood handy in the kitchen: Toothpicks Clean the hole. Put in some glue. Stuff the hole with toothpicks (possibly dipped first in glue - depends on how big the hole is and how much glue oozes out as you stuff in the ...


36

Those wooden circles are plugs that will pry out of the holes in the balusters. Under that would be a pre-drilled hole for a screw (typically). I would have never used nails on this in the first place. The correct fix is going to be to remove the nails and replace them with screws that fit into the existing holes snugly. If there is really just a nail ...


29

The Easy Way Fortunately, you're holding up a model train, not an actual train, so you can take some liberties. The hard part is following the rounded, off-square corners; the easy way to work around that is to literally cut corners. Rather than attempt to follow the rounded corners, just install four shelves as long as the straight parts of each wall, ...


27

You can't. Wood doesn't "pop back out". The wood is actually broken. If you just want to repair it structurally, then filling in with something like a suitable epoxy and sanding would work. Getting it to look like the undamaged original will be impossible or very difficult at best. This is due to the grain, and no replacement piece of wood having the ...


24

Ditto what Olin said. But here is another option: Hollow core doors are probably the cheapest thing that can be replaced in a home. Brand new from a big box home improvement store for approx. $40 or if you have any "Habitat for Humanity ReStore" stores in your area, for much less. Even if you do patch the door, you will always see that patch. Heck, if ...


24

It's important to remember the difference between a bolt and a screw (this is handy if you don't know the size of the bolt or screw) Screws have the threads doing the work of holding. Your hole should be the size of the screw shaft. In other words, hold a drill bit above the screw. You should still see the threads, but not the shaft. Bolts have a nut doing ...


23

Screws: It doesn't sound like you're reattaching the entire floor; this is more like strategic intervals to solidify the fastening. Your nail/screw rate is not as important as if you were attaching a new subfloor from scratch. Glue and screw is popular for more reasons than just rhyming You're going through this effort to make it right. So do it right.


23

You method was not really a good solution because, like others have said, glue is relatively weak by itself. You need some 'meat' to properly hold the screws. But it may continue to hold because there are other screws left in the wood to hold the hinges. If you have lots of screw holes stripped then you would be in trouble. The toothpicks method outlined ...


23

Trimming the roller shade is obviously the right answer, but just in case somebody has a similar problem where it isn't the right answer: Don't try and create a router cut 3½" deep and ¼" wide - create one 3½" wide and ¼" deep. No router will have a problem with that. Probably easiest to clamp a piece of scrap to the outside of the beam, and then just cut ...


23

I take it for $700 you are paying people to do this work. And I gather these are garden variety handymen using random products bought at the local builder supply; when people say "polyurethane" without any qualifiers, they usually mean the Home Depot stuff. Have you talked to marine/boat painting places? There are a variety of products intended for ...


21

You don't. You transfer cut marks. You don't need to make a paper plan of your cuts. Just lay the shelves on each wall. Don't attempt to span a whole wall with 1 shelf board, it should always be 2 boards for ease of handling. If the wall angle is less than 90 degrees, initially cut each shelf at 80 degrees so its back can go all the way into the corner....


21

You'd want a hand held jig saw Or a stationary band saw or a scroll saw You could also do it with a hand held coping saw But it would be alot of work and difficult to get good square, smooth results with the coping saw. It takes some practice & skill, and/or a good bit of sanding & filing to get those nice smooth cuts with either tool. You'll ...


19

You can make straight cuts parallel to an existing edge by using a circular saw with a guide. To make the bottom edge of the cut clean, be sure the saw does not cut much more deeply than the thickness of the material. You can also put tape on the cut line, before cutting, to prevent the saw from breaking off small pieces of the material on the top edge of ...


19

When you buy a hex bolt, the size on the label is the diameter of the shank below the head. The outside diameter (aka major diameter) of the threads will be no larger than this diameter. So for a 3/8" bolt, it's simple - you drill a 3/8" hole.


18

Bad idea...explained later. But yes, as long as you keep the blade guard on & of course it will "work". Though, it's quite wild compared to a Circular Saw or a smaller Trim Saw. However, "safely" is a bad gamble. You're talking about multiples of higher RPM's & both accuracy & control will then be largely out the window compared to proper ...


18

Prior to drilling the "through-hole", mark the location on both sides and use a paddle-style wood boring bit slightly larger than the O.D. of your flat washer, to make a large flat-bottomed hole. Make the holes no deeper than necessary to make the nut, washer, and bolt end sit flush (you would need a shorter bolt). For more precise creation of a flat-...


17

It is difficult to fully access the problems with the wood behind your door hinge without a picture to see the extent of the damage. None the less let me describe a reasonable repair technique that works well. I would skip the schemes of jamming additional wood sticks or slivers into the existing screw holes because these methods are stop gap measures at ...


17

"it's sap crystals that have been extruded from the wood due to high attic temperatures. We see more of this sap staining when the wood used for framing was not kiln dried before construction." Inspectapedia Sap in painted wood will cause staining but it is ok in the attic.


17

You need to pre-drill a large but shallow hole of the correct depth, and use the bit size recommended by the manufacturer for the material you are setting those into. Too small and you'll crack the wood/whatever. Too big and they won't hold. It matters. You might want to try on some scrap first. Did the supplier provide these nuts full knowing that ...


17

People use the wrong screws outside quite a lot, but thankfully there are good alternatives. Outdoor decking and fencing are commonly assembled with coated screws advertised for such. They typically come in tan or green depending on the application and can hold up for a long time without rust or staining the wood. Stainless steel screws are another option ...


15

I will show how to build a simple A-frame swingset from pressure-treated four-by-fours and scraps, with minimal cutting. From a six-inch-wide pressure-treated board (e.g., a 5/4-inch by 6 inch deck board), cut four isosceles trapezoids with bases that are 11 and 16 inches. Take two legs (8-foot-long 4x4s) and align them with the legs of one of the trapezoid ...


15

Fine nails are fine. But you do need to drill a clearance hole the full diameter of the nail shaft through the plastic. You may want to drill a smaller pilot hole at least partway into the wood to reduce the chance of splitting. Any standard drill bit will do, but go very slowly to avoid melting the plastic as you drill. Drill bits tend to walk on plastic, ...


14

I'd make a template in the shape of a square donut out of 1/2" plywood by using a table saw to cut out the square hole in the 1/2" plywood. For example, if ... i) the recess in the desktop needs to be 8"x12" ii) the diameter of the base of the router is 6" iii) the diameter of the router bit is 1/2" ... then I'd ... 1) start with a rectangular piece ...


14

Studs are cut to length at the mill so you can build your 8’ walls without cutting the ends off the top and bottom plates with studs make a quick tilt up wall, the rest is true 8’ 10’ 12’ . Note if remodeling verify length prior to building a wall.


13

The sanding of coats in-between is to give the new coat something to adhere to. It roughs up the surface just enough to give it a bit of grip. Multiple coats is the same as anything else. Multiple coats makes the coating thicker, stronger and more lustrous. Cars have multiple coats of paint to protect the body; you paint your walls with multiple coats to ...


13

You might use a half-round rasp or file.


13

I'd suggest going with the plywood over the particle board. Will probably be a lot lighter, and probably more dimensionally stable as well. Depending on your scenery goals, I might suggest using 1/2" ply with a foam top to allow ground contours for visual interest. Use blue or pink foam, and not the white beaded foam, as that is much more messy. To cut ...


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