Hot answers tagged

49

If you are worried about access around your pool you should be extending your fence as necessary (beginning at right angles to the end showing in the picture) so that it encloses the area of concern. That can all be done on your property with no quibbles from the neighbor.


31

Plant a bush in the corner. Something with needles or thorns should keep dogs and children out.


31

If you decide to go the full malicious compliance route: You can begin to call bylaw on him - to the best of my knowledge, there are usually local ordinances about keeping one's lawn maintained. Eventually the grass will grow as he is unable to cut it. Refuse him access to your property to cut the grass, but tell him that you're willing to do it provided ...


29

Why use any gravel? Fill entirely with soil.


28

That is called Paver Edging. It is used to keep the pavers tight or to separate one section from the other. It's usually covered to the point that you only see a small strip of it. However, it looks like the installer didn't quite finish the job. I would probably do as you suggested and bury the edging deeper. You could also take up those few bricks that are ...


22

It looks like a standard 4×4 post with concrete poured around it. The square in the middle should have some wood left to be sure. The hole may go 36-48" down depending on local code even deeper. I usually use a tractor and a chain to pop old fence post out when on a job but on my place I just shifted the fence post several feet and left them in the ground.


20

It is your pool. It is your job to guard it. I imagine your state law or city ordinance is clear on that point. You are missing an important point here. You are trying to use your neighbor's fence to protect your pool. It's his fence and he has a right to remove it at any time. He could remove a panel right after you go to work, and put it back right ...


20

You need to be careful how much you impede the natural flow of water off your neighbor's yard. If your property is downhill of your neighbor's, the water flows naturally from his property to yours. You could find yourself in legal jeopardy if you dam up or otherwise prevent that natural flow. On the other side of the coin, your up-hill neighbor can not, ...


19

The first thing I would do is cross-brace the gate. You need to do something like this: If you Google search for "wood gate diagonal bracing" you'll get lot's of images showing the proper way to do this.


19

So put a drain channel along the edge of the fence - even a trench filled with gravel can help. Then create some raised beds where you can control the water ie humidity and it can help with pests as well.


18

you should angle the post that's by the house. It will increase the functionality of the gate hardware. If you're worried about looks, you can always take a piece of fence plank and install it from the post corner over to the house wall.


15

Gates that wide are going to need extra support, otherwise they'll surely sag (as you've found out). An easy solution might be to put wheels on the gates, so that the wheels support the weight of the gate. Other options include compression/tension bracing built into the gates, and/or making the gates out of a more rigid material. Heavier duty hinges ...


15

I put some posts into concrete - made a dry mix and tamped it down. Next day it was just about done - the mix absorbed moisture from the surrounding soil and was fine. If you need a really smooth top surface then adding a wetter screed is a possibility.


14

The official answer is find a local land surveyor and hire them to do a property survey. However, you can do a bit of research on your own, and may be able to figure out where the property lines are well enough to get by without hiring a surveyor, which can cost $250-1,000+, depending on the size of your property and how complicated the boundaries are. Note ...


14

No. Unless you live in a swamp, there won't be enough moisture, and even if you do it won't be mixed with the cement properly. The concrete will be dry, crumbly, and have no strength. Just mix it like the directions say.


14

Your best bet would be the correctly sized metal screw. Not a bolt, but a screw. Some of them are self drilling/tapping (these are commonly referred to as simply "self-tapping" in the US). They will drill their own hole and tap their own threads all in one step. If you can't find the right sized metal screw, you can get a self-tapper a little bigger than ...


13

Coyote rollers, won't harm children like barb wire, is effective, and can be home owner installed. A Coyote Roller is a patented ribbed roller that mounts to the top of your fence. When a coyote or other predator tries to jump your fence to attack your pets, it requires them to grab hold of the top of a fence. With Coyote Rollers in place, the animals ...


13

I lost about fifteen 'concreted-in' fence posts in a windstorm and noted two universal things: all broken posts broke off at the ground line, just above the concrete removing (pulling) the now useless 'anchors' is a beastly task, but once done, it's an easy way to re-do the posts and restore your fences in exactly the same place with no new digging. I ran ...


13

A small trench may not help, but most certainly a full-on dry well with some French Drain buried along the property boundary will do the trick. That's a lot of work, but it is the solution. Keep in mind that your low veggie garden will get flooded every time there's a serious rainstorm, due to the slope of the land. You might as well find a solution that ...


12

Unless you are in a extremely dry area this is fine. The concrete mix will absorb moisture from air and surrounding soil and will slowly set. Usually a couple of days is all it takes. Some rain or a bucket of water will speed up the process, but isn't really needed. In fact, poured concrete is more in danger off being over-saturated with water, which ...


11

Many vendors do recommend pouring the concrete in dry, but then they advise to pour a specific amount of water on top to immediately set, not to allow rain and ground moisture to cure the concrete. This lets you skip mixing in the wheelbarrow or bucket and then shoveling the wet concrete in with a lot more cleanup of the tools required. For strength, the ...


11

A quick and easy solution would be to get a 2" x 12" x 10' P.T.board and bury it a few inches into the ground along the fence and screw it into the bottom of the fence. You could extend it as far as you needed along the fence. Get a board rated for ground contact.


11

This is a common technique for setting posts in the ground. Here is a video from Quickcrete that explains how to do it: Quickcrete Dry Mix Post Setting


10

I own a ranch and home in San Antonio Tx. and in town I have tried all the tricks to soaking in chemicals to tar. Just cement alone will rot out your posts. Limestone is best. On the ranch I use telephone poles and either sand only or limestone. Both will pack like cement, but you have to put a little in the hole and use a heavy tamper, then a little more ...


10

Personally I don't like concreting in wooden posts, because eventually they will rot and have to be replaced. Getting the old concrete out is then difficult. Ideally, concrete in a short concrete fence post and use coach screws to fix your wooden posts to these. The concrete will never rot, your wooden posts can be set off the ground, so will last almost ...


10

I had a similar issue but a small angle so it wasn't worth bothering to fix it. I think you definitely have to go with the second orientation. (square up the gate opening) Are you using 4x4 or 6x6 posts? Maybe get a 4x8 or 6x12 post for the house side. Then cut a complimentary angle to the house so that you don't have just a point touching your house. ...


9

If I understand your question correctly, the situation is like this: All you have to do is close the gap by nailing a plank onto your fance outside your properties like this: This extra barrier would be in communal (Government or "Council" in Australia) property, so he could not demand you remove it. If he complains to the authorities you can say that you ...


8

I'd get some Barbed Wire arms for the fence. Since a picture is worth 1000 words, However, the non technical answer is that it's legally your neighbour's problem. Depending on your jurisdiction, it might be legal to shoot the dog. Pitbulls are often great dogs. But they can also be awful dogs if owned by idiots.


8

I understand that it would be difficult to dig holes for a concrete footing for your posts. Depending where you are located and the soil types, you could drive the posts in and still have a stable fence. If you are in an area with frost in the ground, I would encourage you to set them at least 3 feet deep if the soil is stable and compacted. The basic rule ...


8

Two things are key to eliminate sag: Rock-solid posts that are anchored in the ground well Gates that have diagonal bracing built in If your posts are leaning, or if they wobble with the wind, you won't be able to accomplish much. They must remain plumb, and they must be stout enough to not flex appreciably. If your gate panels are sagging in parallax, ...


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