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5

Since you'll be finishing the pieces in the building, lacquer is out. It stinks to high Heaven and unless you use a pre-catalized lacquer, it is prone to water stains such as condensation from a cold glass of water. I used to prefer oil based Polyurethane but that can have a strong odor too and that odor can last a while. For simple, tough, (not fancy) ...


4

Balcony = Supported by hidden joists under its floor. Deck = Supported by joists or/and piers. Now if you have a balcony and given your question with lack of some information... You are capital letters CRAZY for installing a hot tub on a balcony. For something that heavy you would have to be assured metal joists or deep span (that might not be enough). ...


3

The flash point of a material is the temperature above which it will give off vapors that can ignite. It's NOT the temperature at which the fumes or the material will self-ignite. As a point of reference, you likely handle gasoline regularly and its flash point is -45F! Just ensure that there are no ignition sources while you are using the product and have ...


3

I think you're being confused by the terms wet and dry. These terms are usually used to describe the condition of wood after it's cut from a tree or pressure treated, not the climate changes of the season. In your case the wood you'll be using will be pressure treated. The P.T. wood you get in home stores has been recently pressure treated and needs to dry ...


3

This was just a bad install and design. I could go over numerous things that were done wrong but the easy solution is just throw a PVC (azec/hardi/whatever) board up there (they have ones with same wood footprint you have). It really is that easy.


2

If those are powderpost beetles of some kind (see this link) you should reduce the moisture in the wood as much as possible (maybe your bed frame receives moisture when you sleep through the mattress). If there is valuable furniture that you want to save you should check with local pest control for fumigation chambers. In case any wood parts of the building ...


2

One possibility is to remove all wooden furniture and have it destroyed. Then have the house professionally fumigated to kill any of the pests that might be in the structure. Worth having the structure checked as it may be that the pests came in with the furniture and are not in the structure so saving you some expense.


2

After failing to find a solution that would (1) look alright, (2) not devalue the house, and (3) be permanent, I looped back and looked to blackout curtains more. The solution I ended up with involved: Getting blackout roller shades cut to size, installing them myself. Buying floor-length blackout curtains and sewing magnets into the seams where they meet, ...


2

It is not unless someone totally incompetent built the home. Lumber is never used flat like that as a load-bearing header. It would need to be full-height in that head space. Disclaimer: I'm looking through the internet at a fuzzy photo with relatively little context. Take Alaska Man's advice and get a local expert on scene.


2

What you have sounds very much like what we Americans would call a 2" x 8" (nominal size, actual size: 1.5" x 7.5" - yeah, we're weird that way...). What you're proposing is making a 4" x 8" (70x190mm) out of it by nailing the two pieces together. That's not only perfectly acceptable, it's very commonly done for use as a header over a door or window*. ...


2

Assuming you're putting the 2x4 on TOP of the joists, then the fasteners holding it in place are not supporting any load and just serve to keep it from moving around. I'd just nail or, preferably, screw it in place with some wood screws. With a 70# load, you're not going to be approaching any limits structurally with a normally built garage but be sure that ...


2

You are correct to be concerned about sanding plywood. The exterior layer is often quite thin, however it shouldn't be that thin on an exterior grade plywood. Get in touch with your FIL and ask if he remembers what kind of plywood he used. I'd guess that it's an AAX - "A" is the surface grade and means that it's got a nice, sanded finish and all ...


2

I would not mix types of paint like that. Most paint systems I have worked with are designed so that the successive coats work together. Rust Oleum etc


2

The problem: Welcome to the joys of working with a natural product! Wood will move year in, year out. Some woods are more stable than others, but they all have cells in them that were designed to move and hold water when the tree was alive. Now that the tree is dead, they're still there, they're just not actively working, but they still work just great ...


2

We design from the top down and build from the bottom up. I’ve learned that staying with “standard building techniques” in both the design and construction phases will save time and money. We design custom homes and when we use a product that’s never been shipped west of the Mississippi, then we’ll pay extra for that particular product and pay extra for the ...


1

For wood in contact with masonry or concrete, the Code requires the use of an approved species and grade of wood such as decay resistant heartwood of Redwood, Black Locust, or Cedar or pressure treated in accordance with AWPA (See ICC R319.1) in areas subject to decay damage according to Table R301.2(1). In the U.S., all but the very very most southern ...


1

Staining it with a good quality opaque stain would provide a lot of protection. No sanding or other preparation needed. I would use oil based stain, if local regs allow it. Apply it with a cheap brush that you dispose of when finished. If you would do this with the gates in place, be sure to place a tarp or newspapers over the nice concrete.


1

Pine boards from local home improvement stores will always warp. Try to install them as soon as you get them. Especially screwing down each corner so it can't warp is the best. But if i don't have time right away or the boards aren't going to be screwed down I usually put them in my garage and sit heavy tool boxes on top of each end so they won't warp as ...


1

I've seen a lot worse. There doesn't appear to be any mold. I'd rip the thinset up to the extent of the loose tiles and the water staining below as soon as possible and start the drying out process. When the drying is complete, you'll be in a better position to judge for damage. If you caught it fast, you'll probably be OK. Once dried, you might think about ...


1

My experience is that if you use a pre-drilled hole that includes a countersink using a tapered drill bit like this: Picture Source ...that it can be very easy to use 2 1/2" or 3" length deck type screws in either toe screw application or thru to end grain joining. If toe screwing is done properly with three screws it is ultimately stronger then ...


1

TL;DR: When you purchase regular (non-pressure treated) lumber, consider it dry enough to work with for any household construction project. When you purchase pressure treated lumber, expect it to feel damp to the touch. You may want to allow it to re-dry for 3-4 months before using it to avoid the majority of the warping/twisting/shrinking effects of drying ...


1

There are many variables with the steel supports 1) type of steel, 2) grade of steel, etc. and with the wood supports: 1) species, 2) grade, etc. I’ll use A36 structural steel and SPF No.1 grade wood for comparison. A 2 1/2” x 2 1/2” x 8’ high square structural tubing can support about 28 kips (28,000 lbs.) in axial (vertical) load. A 4x4x8’ high wood post ...


1

You can run it through a planer to flatten it out, sand it down remove splinters, and then apply a polyurethane sealer to make it inviting for use. Apparently polyurethane is food safe once cured. When using a planer on reclaimed wood just make sure to remove all metal from it beforehand or else you'll be buying new blades often or can hurt yourself: ...


1

good you're joining the wide sides togher to make a wider rafter, not joining the thin sides to make a taller one. joined they will be about as strong as the wider one. possibly even stronger, because the laminated beam will not have any flaws like knots that pass through the whole thickness. "nail lamination" is a thing, it should be covered in your ...


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