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13

Firstly, you may be able to source 54" drywall. Two sheets oriented in the usual horizontal way will cover a wall height up to 108" (9 ft) with one tape joint between them. The extra cost may be worth the effort savings. If your framing is laid out accurately on 16" or 24" centers, 10' sheets would stand up (vertically) nicely. All tape ...


4

If you don't mud the top and bottom, the bevelled edge will show up. At the bottom the baseboard would be at a slight angle and could screw up your mitered angles. The bevelled edge will definitely show up at the top with only quarter round mounted up there. Mounting the quarter round up there might be harder than you think.


4

OK, Those tabs are not up against the drywall. Press the switches in hard until the tabs are against the drywall and then tighten the screws. Then get a two gang switch cover with the four screws that will aid in getting the switches lined up correctly. You can loosen the screws holding the switches to the box a bit if it helps line them up with the new ...


4

No, paint is not required for wall board on combustible (wood) construction. (See ICC Table 720.1(2), Items 12, 14, and 15.) Note: Item 15 includes 2-hour fire rated construction too (two layers of gypsum board). However, be aware that nailing requirements, type of plaster mix, etc. do matter. Most stud spacing is 16” on center, but I did see one with 24” on ...


3

Think about how you're going to trim out the room. You'll use some sort of baseboard molding, how tall is it? You can hide that much drywall seam behind it. It probably won't be 8" tall, so maybe you could put a small filler piece of drywall (maybe 4"?) down low, then put a cove molding up top and cover another small filler piece of drywall behind ...


3

Per the commented suggestion from @DaveM, there are rubber shims/spacers that can be used for worn out, abused, maligned, damaged, or non-flush electrical outlets where getting the electrical switches to pull flush and level upon tightening isn't possible. I used the following pack from Lowe's which was less then $10: https://www.lowes.com/pd/Gardner-Bender-...


2

The fire protection is for fire traveling from the garage to the living spaces, not vise versa. The garage is to be separated from a living space with 1/2” gypsum board installed on the garage side and with a 1 3/8” min. solid core door. (See ICC R309.2) In addition, if a living space is above a garage, then it needs to be separated with 5/8” Type X gypsum ...


2

Ceilings require 5/8" or 1/2" no-sag for 24" joist span. If you're able to screw it at 16" intervals or use adhesive between joists you could use standard 1/2". I wouldn't use 3/8" unless you have backing at 12" intervals or run adhesive between joists. 1/4" just isn't appropriate for a ceiling. Update: For 16" ...


2

I'd put the patched drywall at the bottom, near the floor, for several reasons. It takes more work to plaster and sand, because there are more joints. This is easier to do while standing, not working off a ladder or stilts or scaffold. There's a good chance that you'll be putting furniture along some of the walls, which will hide anything. A flat/matte ...


2

It depends on what you are willing to accept. Kitchens are often painted with a sheen, which will highlight any imperfections. The visibility of imperfections also depends on the lighting. Even the most skilled plasterer is bound to have left a bump, wrinkle, holiday, or ripple somewhere. If you can live with being occasionally reminded that you skipped ...


2

I'd presume that by "drywall shims" you mean pieces of drywall to bring the surface out to the level of the plaster. In that case, your two options are essentially the same thing, and, I think, a great idea. I'd suggest, though, that before you start down that path, you measure the thickness of the plaster & lath from the stud face. You may be ...


1

Another option is to use a pair of holes. I often do this for larger pictures and mirrors, it spreads the load over two fixings and helps stabilisation, no tipping out of plumb or level when the door slams or such like. Re. the original hole, you're going to struggle to fill it well enough to be able to drill half of it out again, especially if it's more ...


1

To start it's always best to screw into a ceiling joist if you can. Even if it's only one side that will give you your best support for the vent. In the pic it looks as if there might be at least one along the edge of the drywall. On the sides with no joist you need hollow wall anchors. screws won't hold in drywall unless you use them. So if you need to ...


1

Yes, any spackle will fix that. Carefully check the metal vent box and you should find some screw holes for the vent. From the picture it looks like there might be a double drywall installation and the screws don't reach into the metal vent box. If that's the case, get some longer screws from your home store.


1

I suggest putting borax between the wall studs, this deters roaches in particular. I used about 4 lbs spread in all the stud spaces when the house and garage were built . I think it has worked well considering we are in the heart of roach country ( E.TX)) and very rarely see a roach in the house..


1

With modern construction I would ask for air sealing, if air cannot get out bugs can’t get in , some locations require it for energy conservation. As tight as modern houses are sealed up I would not want any products in the wall other than insulation.


1

I think the difference appears to be minimal and you can just leave it. Take a tile and place in on the denshield so it overlaps the drywall and place the edge trim behind the tile, if the gap between the back of the edge trim and the drywall is an 1/8" or less it will be fine. A little extra thinset will fill the difference in the depth. The extruded ...


1

I don't think there's an actual name for this, maybe grade school art. After doing all your patching and smoothing out the wall, get a 1" knife, putty knife, dip it in some drywall mud and dap it on the wall. Do it a couple of times without redipping to get the thinner, smaller lines. Dap and twist a bit to get the uneven lines. After it partially dries,...


1

You could extend the wall up into the skylite cavity but still keep it open and light both rooms...


1

My parents house the inside corners were caulked instead of being taped by the drywall contractor and the corners are still perfect now 20 years later! And I have personally done it in my house 5 years ago on some remodeling and it still is perfect as well. So no it is a great idea I love it. So much easier to do.


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