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43

Leave a gap and use a cornice(crown) molding to cover it.


17

Mirror clips are made for exactly this purpose. Plain or fancy as fits your decor and/or budget.


14

If that mirror has a wooden frame you can attach picture hanging brackets. the frame looks to be about 10mm thick which is plenty.


14

If it is not too large of wall I would recommend removing all the old drywall and its fasteners. Then I would shim out the studs with extension strips that even out the wall with the top plate. You may find that not all of these shims are uniform in dimension of any of the studs are bowed or out of plumb. The shims are easily ripped from a 2x4 or 2x6 using ...


12

If the mirror doesn't weigh much more than 15 pounds, you could use some Command picture hanging strips (such as these or these). They're easy to install and relatively inexpensive.


9

If there is nothing wrong with the pre-existing drywall there is no way I could justify removing it. The ceiling joists look like 2x4's turned on their side? I've never seen anything less than 2x6 upright on the ceiling of a house with drywall. I'm also not sure if my eyes are processing the picture correctly. If it's what I think it is, I would nail/...


8

The cornice molding a la @Jasen really is a good answer, and has to be the easiest. But if you don't want to do that, this is probably the second easiest. (Before you dismiss me as a hack, know that I've done this lots, with good-looking results that have held up for years.) I'm assuming you're going to drywall the ceiling. Get a big roll of fiberglass ...


8

Another option is a french cleat. You really, really, don't want mirrors to fall off the wall. They shatter and explode and if there is any biological unit in the area they are likely to get cut (not to mention any heart attacks from the explosion or the seven years bad luck). You can buy one (e.g.: https://www.amazon.com/Hangman-Z-Hanger-Mirror-Picture-...


7

I mounted a similar mirror to a wall by drilling symmetrically-spaced holes through the frame (about one per six inches of frame perimeter) and screwing the mirror directly to the drywall using appropriate-length black phosphate coarse thread drywall screws. In my case the the holes in the frame were acceptable, and due to the dark red-brown color of the ...


5

Screws You might consider double headed nails or screws. I like screws, since nails can work out of the wall. The link below would be a good style, and the last pic shows exactly how it would work with your mirror. This style also allows for adding D-rings, wire, or sawtooth hangers (even though the "artist" is wrong about the orientation of the sawtooth ...


5

ARTICLE 314 Outlet, Device, Pull, and Junction Boxes; Conduit Bodies; Fittings; and Handhole Enclosures 314.20 In Wall or Ceiling. In walls or ceilings with a surface of concrete, tile, gypsum, plaster, or other noncombustible material, boxes employing a flush-type cover or faceplate shall be installed so that the front edge of the box, ...


4

Assuming that: the screws are at least 1/4" in diameter they penetrate at least 1" into the stud the timber ends up snug to the drywall ... this should work fine. The key is that installation leaves the timbers with no gap to the drywall that would allow movement. If there's room for movement, the drywall will eventually be damaged and the screws could ...


4

Mirror clips come in many thickness sizes. Choose one with adequate gap to mirror and use _|— to fasten with exposed screw, but allow mirror to be flush. Use a small < 1cm square double sided tape in middle if it bulges out but permits removal.


3

That looks to me like a texture that developed over the years, inadvertently, with application of multiple layers of paint using a nappy roller. You could try to duplicate by spray texturing in a "small blot" pattern, then knocking it down with a low nap roller. There are probably other ways... maybe a stippling roller would come close. Bottom line is ...


3

Simple. Take the drywall off then take a nice sharp !" chisel and split that 1/2" off and drywall over it. Bam! Done! Is that the prettiest old school way of doing it? Nobody will see it again for 20 or 30 years. Quit trying to complicate it.


3

Mirrors are often mounted simply using double-sided adhesive tape. Just google "adhesive tape mirror", and you'll find a lot of products from all brands. You'll find those in your local depot, too. Just be aware that there are two kind of double-sided tape: one that is very thin, and one that is thicker (~2mm), with a core made of foam. If the wall surface ...


2

You could use a shelf with a ledge on the end like this: or possibly amazon link to secure the mirror.


2

You have a standard drywall wall. I have used these anchors for years with much success. They can be installed without drilling and removed easily without a lot of damage to the wall and used again. I've included a picture of them. They can be used with #6 or #8 screws.


2

When the management company sent a pest control specialist out to our apartment to deal with mice, he stuffed coarse steel wool or wire mesh into any little crevasses like that he could find. He claimed the mice couldn't chew through it, didn't like the feel of it. Not a great permanent solution, but maybe a good first try?


1

Great Stuff makes a foam specifically for pest control. It's easy to apply and expands to fill cracks and voids. It's available at all home stores. Here's a picture so you know what to look for.


1

I love those anchors and use them all the time. Don't bother trying to patch the hole and re drilling it, the patch won't hold. Leave the old anchors in the wall and install a new one an inch or so to the right or left of the old one. Then measure the distance between the keyholes, center to center, and measure that distance from the center of your new ...


1

The insurance company is claiming that skilled workers can remove baseboard without damaging the wall, and therefore repainting the wall is not necessary. Perhaps that is true provided the insurance co. actually paid skilled labor rates. They are underpaying the effort needed to truly detach base molding and not create secondary damages to the wall. Can't ...


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