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53

If your objective is to optimize the product you receive (the completed house) vs the cost you pay for it by sizing to use full sheets of material -- forget it. The cost of all materials combined doesn't strongly dominate the cost of the project; they'll often sum to around half of the project cost. The panelized materials such as plywood or OSB sheathing, ...


19

Drywall/subfloor has to be staggered. So boom you can't make a room that fixes that. Also drywall has depth meaning is your room going to be 12 feet or 12 feet and 1 inch? I have a 5'3" drywall wizard that does a 1000 square feet (including ceiling with lights) in a day easy. He uses a knife and a string and every once in a while a straight edge ...


5

When you add the wallboard to the larger portion of the wall to the opening of the door, stopping all drywall at the door opening, the short portion you have the measuring tape on could take a jamb extension. Which is a piece of wood or MDF cut to fit the space out to the new face of the drywall and that will be trimmed with the same door casing as the ...


3

Sheet goods are best saved by reusing cuts and some builders are really good at that. Well, others are not. Fact is that everyone in this business pays and bills for square feet/meters no matter if the size fits some exact number of sheet material, or not.


3

Cut a piece of steel bar / tube that is thin enough to fit between the back of the glass and the front of the hangers and will reach between the two welded brackets. The bar needs to be strong enough to support the mirror at it's ends without significant bending so it might need to be wide. Drill and tap this so you can fix it to the hangers such that it can'...


3

Since the answer has to take into consideration that the two hangers are not level, you're stuck with one solution: hang it like a picture. Go to your home store and get some stainless steel picture hanging wire rated for 50 to 100 pounds. Make a strong loop around one end and hook it into one of the hangers. Do the same to the other hanger so there's not ...


3

(Suitably sturdy) Picture hanging wire. Wire between the hangers, put a screw or hook into the stud, hang and adjust. "100 lb" rated picture hanging wire is easy to find. As is 200 if you want more safety factor...


3

I don't understand option 2, but option 1 is exactly what I'd do. A few suggestions: Be sure that the thickness of your drywall brings it to flush or slightly below. Do not install patches that protrude above the wall surface. This will be difficult to tape without leaving a bulge. If you end up with a depression after installing the patches, pre-fill ...


2

Joint compound will not seal drywall, which is what the likes of PVA primer does. It's essentially as porous and absorbent as the drywall itself, meaning you'll need two coats of paint instead of one. If you need to level imperfections or get a Level 5 finish, sure. It's not a substitute for primer. Purpose-formulated primer is quite cheap and will be much ...


2

Yes, it's fine to use a skim coat as a paint base, and it reduces the contrast between white dry compound and gray paper under the paint, as well as removing any difference in how the paint takes on compound .vs. paper.


1

Adding a layer of gypsum board over your existing plaster will only be as level as the existing plaster. First, make sure it’s acceptable. Second, you may want to test it to make sure it’s not asbestos. If it is, there’s no special reason to remove it, but you’ll want to be extra careful working in that room until it’s “encapsulated” with the new layer of ...


1

The plaster is sagging probably due to issues with some of the lathe boards above it. Those need to be repaired. If you have access above this you could just knock these totally out and reframe with 2x4s. This would probably be the quickest way. As far as mess... You are thinking about this wrong. Demoing might be a mess. Sanding the mud ...


1

As already mentioned, I would use a piece of Sheetrock to fill in. I would add a couple of points: You'll want to use mesh tape on this. Plaster is portland cement based, meaning it likes to absorb water. The mesh tape will hold up better compared to paper tape here. I'd also look for the rot-resistant sheetrock for the same reason. Secure or remove the ...


1

I recently had a bunch of plaster repairs done and I would go with option 1 with the following tweaks: Use the 'blue board' drywall. I believe this is commonly used in your area. Make sure to leave the boards a little shy of the finished surface: not flush. Level the wall with something good for plaster repair like Durabond 90. Using the mud to create the ...


1

Your code may be different but on this side of the pond the thinner lumber would be ok as it is not a load bearing wall. A hobby room also is not a living space so it may not require fire resistant wall board. I would check with the local building code enforcement to make sure I was doing it to code.


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