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25

Get a piece of ply bigger than the hole (at least 2 or 3 times the size and use it to spread the load. If the clamping side is also small then another spreader may be a good idea. There was a similar question like this previously... See Best way to spread load on monitor clamp


18

As I've posted before, the risks of asbestos exposure on a very infrequent basis in a residential setting are highly over-blown. The real risks were for construction workers (pipe insulators, HVAC insulators, etc. ), back 50-60 years ago who where exposed to asbestos dust on a daily basis. I know the lawyers will hate me for saying this, but frankly ...


15

The minimum would be diagonal bracing on back and side. +---+ | /| | / | |/ | +---+ Triangles resist lateral forces much better than rectangles do.


13

If you want to be slightly decorative you could try something like this... Start with an aluminum cake pan, maybe 8" diameter (or larger?) With a removable bottom; example: You only need the bottom. Bend the circular bottom twice with e.g., a vice, or using clamps & a block of wood (*), so that it carefully will slide over the thickness of the ...


12

Search for "Lift up" hinges. These will let you lift up a section of desk to reveal something underneath, but won't let you click in the desk to lift it up. For that, you'll want push latches. I'm not quite sure how well those will work in combination. As a fallback, consider some kind of recessed handle. (There's a bunch of options out there.)


8

That is a big piece of wood. There are three obvious approaches: Get some professionals to do it. A grand piano weighs more than that (and is more awkwardly shaped). Professionals will have the experience and equipment to do it safely, and the indemnity insurance to pay if anything gets damaged. Slide it gently down the stairs (possibly manufacturing a ...


7

Looks to me like you have a GALANT leg. From IKEA's website The legs shall be fitted on to the frame before the table top is put in place. If you only have the table and legs, you may not have everything you need. Based on instructions found at the customer service site linked to by alt, you need to put the legs onto the frame bar piece, then put the ...


7

To hold it up there are cupboard door stays used in motorhomes/caravans (RVs etc.). Here (eBay) are some I've used. They're just a spring in a tube, and aren't all that string, but should do this job. They're often used together with push latches. If it's very heavy, look for small gas struts (a smaller version of those used in car boots/trunks). You'll ...


6

You could add some very large steel L brackets to brace the legs and try to stiffen them a bit, but it would still be somewhat shakey. The "right" way to fix this is to use "cross bracing". The two cross members you have on the back should be diagonal instead of horizontal. Diagonal cross members prevent the side-to-side wobble that makes your table feel ...


6

I think this technique using chords with 90 degree lines is probably the easiest to do because it involves standard construction tools and can compensate for inprecise measurements. You just need a square, a measuring tape and a straight edge. (A large enough carpenter's square is all of these in one tool) Draw two arbitrary chords (lines across) anywhere ...


6

Since you'll be finishing the pieces in the building, lacquer is out. It stinks to high Heaven and unless you use a pre-catalized lacquer, it is prone to water stains such as condensation from a cold glass of water. I used to prefer oil based Polyurethane but that can have a strong odor too and that odor can last a while. For simple, tough, (not fancy) ...


6

There are purpose-built products out there that are designed to do this. Hard to show an example without it coming across as a recommendation, but you may want to explore something like this: Table Top Fitting, Swing Up, Tavoflex To stress, this is merely an example and not a product recommendation. For my money, I think I'd save myself the frustration of ...


6

I know its not a fix as such, but its probably not worth going out your way to fix this issue, The desk in question is very cheap and a new top can be purchased for as a little as £6. https://www.ikea.com/gb/en/p/linnmon-table-top-white-00251135/ Despite being honeycomb particleboard these tops are suprisingly strong so im suprised your mount managed to make ...


6

A piece of a board between the clamp and the tabletop should work. If not sturdy, then drill a hole in the clamp arm and use a screw to secure the end of the board. You could also attach the board to the underside of the table with doublesided tape. If you cannot find wood, then get a cheap plastic cutting board meant for kitchen use. Another possibility, ...


5

They're called table slides or extension slides. They generally come in 2 versions - one for pedestal type tables (sometimes called equalizer slides) and one for traditionally legged tables. As far as the design goes, you're pretty much limited to your imagination and woodworking ability. Just build it like you would any other extending table, but with the ...


5

That should be a "hanger bolt", with screw threads on one end and bolt threads on the other. If it's really bent you could unscrew it from the leg and install a replacement.


5

If you have the space, a freestanding workbench away from the wall is a great thing to have. It is much easier to move your body around the bench and workpiece than to rotate the workpiece, particularly when you would rather not disturb its position. You can make it strong with heavy construction (big strong legs). The drawback is the same as with any ...


5

Your table and legs and floor are turning into parallelograms. This is because the legs have no resistance against swinging on their mounts. I suspect that these legs are not designed to prevent this, because they expect the desk surface will be anchored in both dimensions by something else, e.g. Being attached to a wall. You will either need to select ...


5

Don't hokey-doke this thing when it's so easy to do it right. You already have the right wires in the wall You already have a dedicated circuit for your table saw. I presume you don't plan on running both saws at the same time. So we'll simply convert the dedicated table saw line to 240V and we're done. Let's talk about the difference between a 240V ...


5

The "very minimalist look" is a bit too minimalist for boring old function. You may regret "living with it" when it fails and a hunk of rock lands on your foot (or other body part), or someone else's. Failure is very much an option. Fasteners can be ripped out pretty easily, and wood can fail when you have a long lever (legs) attached to ...


5

Enlarge your hole to a minimal rectangle with square corners that meets the edge of the desk's frame. Cut a block of wood to match the indicated hole. Glue it to the wood frame (marked in green), and to the (interior) bottom of the desk if it's smooth enough. Run screws as indicated in the picture, so that they pierce through the wood frame and the block. ...


4

Short answer, vertical and strong. I have an old Saginaw Expand-o-Matic that opens from 24" to 90" and is designed to only use the end legs, no middle support. Not sure where you could find this hardware today though. You want the sliders to be vertical because the majority of the stress will be vertical stress of the table and contents weight. It also ...


4

It is possible. Making good cuts is going to be the trickiest part. If you have a large table saw that can accommodate the table top that will give you the best results. Otherwise you can use a straight edge with a sharp, fine toothed blade in a circular saw. Use painter's tape over where you are going to cut. Mark the line then score the line a couple of ...


4

I agree that replacing with tempered glass is your best option. But if you want cheap, there are other options. I don't know about regular super glue or Krazy glue. It would probably work fine. Loctite makes a super glue specifically for glass. I used to work for an art glass/leaded glass company 20 years ago and we used a glue that was cured by UV light....


4

Just in basic table design you are missing the horizontal supports right under your table top. The first three horizontal supports are not only too low, too thin, but they are also installed wrong. You have them going across the table legs. If they were inside the table legs the tables would be set to a fix point. As it stands you have created a flex ...


4

If you know the radius, use your tape measure from a point on the edge to draw an arc at the radius of the table. Then choose another point 1/3 of the way round and repeat. Then the other third. That should leave you a tiny little triangle in the middle if you got your radius right. The centre is the middle of that. If you are not sure it is totally round,...


4

Because of the different motions, a belt sander could cause a deeper "line" where the edge of the belt hits the wood, since you can only go back and forth with it, certainly not optimal. With an orbital sander you would be moving it very quickly, in different directions and because of the way the pad moves as well, you would not be "eating" into the wood as ...


4

Appearance and longevity. You can plane down the 3" one quite a few times, but it seems unlikely you'd be using cleavers on your desk. You might want to weigh the price difference between 6/4 and 7/4 against the ability to sand stains and dings out of the thicker one though. That extra quarter inch may add decades of life to the desk in the long run.


3

As it appears the 'wobble' is between the metal leg, the metal bracket, and the bolts provided, I'd say this wobble is due to IKEA's ahem rather wide tolerance specifications. In other words, sometimes you just get wobble when it comes to IKEA products. :) I'd suggest using something to solidify the connection between the leg and the plates. JB Weld would ...


3

There is a way to create such a composite timber. Actually, all other things being equal (the species, cut and quality of the wood), a built up sandwich is actually stronger than a solid piece of wood. This is done by laminating the three boards together. A generous layer of wood glue, such as Titebond II, is spread over one face of one of the boards. The ...


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