4

When asbestos was used in everything from cooking pan trays to attic insulation on ducts I don't remember hearing of it being mixed into concrete walls or floors. Even if it was used with the concrete the only way to release it and have it become air borne (where it is a hazard through inhalation) would be if the floor was chiseled or ground on. Mopping or ...


4

I would start by digging a trench and filling with gravel / small stones to direct the water away as much as possible. Did that at the back of my property - started at 6" deep and went to 12" as it needs a small slope. directed the water into an existing drain and it worked a treat. Only took 2 afternoons of digging and measuring the slope. Edit: ...


3

You could get something called a trim screw. They also sell them in white if you wish to match the color and not cover the hole with putty. It sounds like you don't feel comfortable with trim nails as you might damage the surface of the material with your hammer. Quite frankly, that will likely happen if you're a novice. A brad nailer is great for speed but ...


3

Do you still have any pieces of laminate and willing to some more work? You are supposed to undercut the door jamb with saw and slide the laminate under the jamb for a clean look


2

Once upon a time we used hammers. Just pre-drill (pilot) for hardened trim nails. Hardened trim nails are narrower and stiffer than mild steel nails. I'd use 2" length, which should leave about 1" of penetration into the framing. They'll drive like butter and they'll set nicely. You can even use one of the nails as a drill bit. Other tips When ...


2

Natural wood, even within a given species, can have a range of color tones. You can see this even in the old boards, none of which are exactly the same color. Some are more blonde, some are more grey, etc. White oak can turn pink shortly after milling. However, this color should have gone away long before the board was delivered as flooring. Red oak on the ...


1

A few ideas to raise that area ~1/8": Use a second layer of your flooring underlayment. Cut cereal boxes to fit and staple in place. Skim with a floor leveling product. Purchase an inexpensive roll of vinyl flooring and cut it to fit. Staple it in place.


1

I could imagine condensation forming on a cold floor but I would think less would form on top of your mat and dog bed. They would not get as cold as the flooring and they would protect the floor beneath from collecting condensation. I would think that if you were sweaty enough to soak your mat through you would notice that. As re the pet bed - dogs don't ...


1

Looks like vinyl flooring (appropriate for bath rooms). It most likely needs to be glued down. Be aware that some sheet material needs a special adhesive while others are glued by just applying adhesive to the perimeter of the sheet. look for the manufacturer's name on the bottom and check their web page for specifics. Just a quick primer on installation: ...


1

construction adhesive + nails/hammer would be another option. You could space out the nails less frequently than you would with a nail gun.


1

I would recommend a nail spinner, it looks like this: Image from somewhere on Pinterest. This particular one is a Vermont American tool (to make finding one easier, not a recommendation or endorsement). I used one for many years before my FIL purchased a finish nailer that I can borrow from him when I need it. You chuck the nail spinner into your drill and ...


1

It seems a sump in the lowest corner with an electric pump would keep water at a minimum . Maybe two sumps . Break /cut through the concrete and put in a cement or even a plastic tub to set the pump into.


1

Building a higher floor inside is not solving the problem of water getting into your shed. Your plan to to level gravel for a cement floor sounds smart and feasible. The gravel under the block would allow water to drain if the existing concrete slab were pitched properly. You did state there was a high point to the floor, but unless that high point is ...


1

You can try cleaning the grime off (thats some of the carpet pad impregnated with dirt), but ultimately you should refinish the wood floor. This involves a commercial sanding machine and other equipment not readily available. To clean try and scrape as much of the crud off as possible using a putty knife or a paint scraper. try not to gouge the wood or ...


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