8

Based on the picture and what you described, you have tile set over vinyl sheet flooring that was put down over 1/4 in plywood used as underlayment, and the gray stuff underneath is the old floor boards. I'm assuming you want to tile this because it's no longer going to have something sitting on it and you just want it to match for the next few years until ...


3

I would be cleaning up that square, get rid of the wood and cut the edges straight down to the floor. Then mix up your thinset and set your tiles. I'm assuming you don't have the exact type of tiles so place the new ones in to your liking and then grout. If you do have the same type of tiles, then chip out the old cut tiles and add the new ones to match the ...


3

I'd strongly recommend talking to the landlord to see if he will fix the improperly installed laminate flooring. If he refuses, but gives you permission (I'd get it in writing, just to be sure) to make a permanent change to the apartment, I'd recommend a two step process: Squeeze some caulk (clear or matching color if you can find it) into the gaps. ...


2

Shallow would be just a scratch in the protective layer. Deep is into the wood layer, and that looks likely from your pictures.


2

When I did my kitchen recently, I just laid the cement board wall-to-wall, because it wasn't worth it to cut the sheets where the base cabinets would go. Plus you get a bit of waterproofing too. Don't forget that you will want tile under the refrigerator, dishwasher, and free-standing range.


1

While I'm no contractor, I've done my own tile for years, and helped quite a few friends tear out old and install new - and this looks an awful lot like a lot of the "tear out" jobs. You have essentially three options: The cheap option. Fill in the hole with plywood, thick enough to generally match the linoleum, and apply thinset directly onto the ...


1

Generally not recommended. Trusses are not engineered to carry additional weight on their bottom chords. There are "storage" trusses that can be specified when the house is built that will be able to carry the additional load.


1

Old post here but if anyone else is considering this. I recommend not even bothering to pull the floors. If you have a crawl space underneath, encapsulate it instead to prevent draft, make the house more efficient, and promote airflow from below (you want this as you allow a bit of heat to go into the encapsulated space. Any gaps can be filled with filler ...


1

Sounds like carpenters don’t like doing things the difficult proper way of a construction schedule. All I here is it’s harder for a carpenter to install doors after floors are installed. It’s human nature to seek the easier softer way, but it only makes common sense that you install floors first then have a skilled carpenter to put door frames on top of ...


1

I like to suggest dropping a chalk line in the middle of the room on the diagonal and nailing a one by two board following that chalk line. Start with the groove of first board against that one by two and install to the corner. Once you have installed to the corner, remove the one by two and fit a quarter inch by 3/8th inch spline in the groove and nail ...


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