8

Since you're not asking how to level the floor, and since that would be a much more substantial project requiring much more information, I'll just address the molding detail. Base shoe exists in part because it bends on the vertical plane much more readily than taller base trim does. It can be made to fit floors that aren't flat without planing or other cuts....


4

I would use an oscillating multi-tool with a wood/hardwood blade. Most of them allow you to set the blade to various angles in relation to the body of the tool allowing you to find the most comfortable way to make the cut. It can be unwieldy to start the cut without a steady hand, but a guide right on your line can get it started. Holding the blade ...


3

The proper way is to replace the piece, but this is either laborious if you have to replace planks until you get to the damaged one, or it is very difficult and risks damaging the rest of the flooring, especially if you attempt lifting it out by lifting and wiggling the whole floor. This assumes it's a click-in type. If you have an extra piece for ...


3

If you can get a look at the floor joists below, you might want to investigate why that dips so badly right there. If there's old termite damage, you're probably OK. If there is current termite activity or other rot, you may will want to fix that first. You may be able to drive shims between the joist and flooring to push the floor up to meet the trim, then ...


2

This is probably the smallest power rotary saw you may find. You need the tool handler from "Dremel" though.


2

I am installing LVP now with attached pad, additional pad will void your warranty. Anyway, you don't want too much cushion as this will affect the locking of the planks. You can also verify through manufacturer/installation instruction as I did.


1

If you pop the tile out (may be possible depending how long it's been in place, and the nature of your mortar) or break it out if it won't pop, and chisel the mortar out below it until the replacement tile will set below the other tiles, then add just enough mortar to bring it up to level, you can avoid redoing the whole floor. Depending on the problem area, ...


1

What worked I used the accepted answer along with the advice in its comments. I nailed a guide down with brads for the circular saw and cut all but the first two and last two boards that way. That took just a few minutes. It took me a few tries to get the depth right because I didn't want to cut the plywood. I moved and renailed the guide and did the ...


1

An "embankment" is a raised earth to either separate/protect an area from the waterway, such as a levee; or divert, collect, and drain the storm water runoffs, such as the raised earth at the highway entrance/exit ramps. The sloping surface of the raised earth (embankment) requires protection to avoid the fine soil particles been washed away by the ...


1

If you have extra planks, use an oscillating saw and cut a u shape around the door jamb so you can remove the plank, then put it aside and tape it together and use as a template for a replacement plank. Thats the easy way. Otherwise you'll have to remove entire floor from other side as that looks to be the order they installed it.


1

Thank you all very much for the advice. I decided to give the planer a go, since worst case scenario, I could rip the subfloor out if I made it worse. It worked REALLY well. I was able to completely get the peak out of the floor, sanded it, and now its level! I think had this been a bigger area, taking it out would have been a better plan, but with there ...


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