4

From what you've told us, it sounds like you are trying a number of good ideas to help mitigate the smell and lingering off-gassing but maybe not optimally. I actually would advise against using bowls of water or vinegar and adding unnecessary moisture to the air. You actually want to remove moisture from the air (air conditioners //air dehumidifiers do ...


3

If we're talking about any sort of engineered joist (truss, TJI), stop reading now and consult a local engineer. This answer assumes solid 2x10 lumber. I'm guessing that you don't mean a header so much as a joist fit between the sistered joists alongside. Since the span is so short (presumably 32" or less), you can use a single joist of the same height as ...


2

All edges need to be concealed by trim, whether it's baseboard, base shoe, transition strip, or termination molding. In most of the cases you mentioned, a simple L-molding should do, such as against the stair railing board. Obviously your stairs are getting some new treatment or other, so that could serve as the overlay. Consider cutting channels under ...


2

Mark the new plank with a depth line and measure the gap under the baseboard. Put masking tape on the plank so the line comes off after.


2

Check the "surface prep" instructions as it will likely instruct you to remove all previous residue, grease, dust, etc... or else they won't warrant their product. FYI, removing all of the residue is damn near impossible as you are finding out and if you lay down new peel-n-stick then take a wild guess at what will happen to your new flooring in a few years....


1

If you're happy with the height of the kitchen baseboard being a little lower, then you could cut a strip off the bottom of the kitchen baseboard so when it rests on the tile, its height matches the lounge baseboard. You can then mitre the right end to make a neat finish with the lounge. If the baseboard ends here then the left end can be mitred as shown ...


1

There are several factors in designing floor systems Normal Loading consists of Live Loads (people, furniture, etc.) and Dead Loads (carpet, subfloor, insulation, ceiling finish below, etc.) The Code requires a minimum of 40 psf Live Load and 10 psf Dead Load. Check to see if your construction exceeds this minimum. You can google how much plywood weighs ...


1

The joists will be more springy than with a shorter span. It will carry the load that they are designed for. If you want to reduce the springiness, set the joists at 12" centers instead of 16" and add 2 rows of bridging instead of one through the center. This of course will cost more and carry a much heavier load but will reduce deflection.


1

First off, check with the manufacturers of the tile you're putting down on surface preparation. In my experience, glues and adhesives don't stick well to old glues and adhesives or to the residue they leave. You should clean the surface with an adhesive remover like Goof Off. You can get it at many home stores. As always, read and follow the directions. Good ...


1

That has a high probability of being particle board. You can doublecheck by looking at where the big gouges are... if the material is small flakes/big sawdust, then it's particle board. (Destructive triplecheck by putting a puddle of water on top and seeing if it puckers up.) Given that you've got a fair bit of damage, now might be the time to replace it ...


1

To me, it looks more like solid wood planks. As mentioned previously, your choices are basically to sand it down and have it fully restored, which in my experience is expensive, or completely replace the flooring which might actually be cheaper. Might be a better idea to choose new flooring, maybe go with lookalike wood flooring that's a bit more hard ...


1

Why do you want to identify the type of flooring? It looks like solid wood flooring. Are you looking to identify install type (floating, nail, glue down), wood species? For a scratch like that I'd be tempted to just spot sand and try to buff a finish in that blends with the existing. In order to do that well you'd probably want to try sanding a board ...


1

You have two choices: Sand down and refinish the entire room Can be costly. DIY tends to produce terrible results Remove, replace, and finish just the affected planks If you choose this then you can more easily identify the wood once it is removed


1

Asbestos was identified in the 70’s as a health concern by the late 80’s it had strict regulations for inspecting and removal although the EPA ban in the US & many other countries also banned asbestos. Asbestos was still legal into the early 90’s in some areas if you are concerned have the material tested. Color of a material is not an indication if it ...


1

Years ago there was a product for wood working that was like a stick of plastic that you melted into gouges. It had multiple colors and if it is still available you could probably find it at a woodworking site.


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