50

A 1.5" hole (38mm) in concrete is beyond any conventional drill. You might get away drilling empty block, but not a foundation. I'd suggest renting a big rotary hammer drill driver for this job. Most rental places are happy to rent you a suitable bit for the task as well, on the basis if you didn't have the tool you're unlikely to have the proper sized ...


44

Slab on grade is probably the kind of pour you are referring to. The problem is only partially one of lifting the slab, the other half is having the slab rest again on the grade. These kinds of concrete pours fill all the irregularities of the ground they are poured upon. If one could lift the slab without slab damage, the setting of the slab on a new ...


34

The hammering action of the drill isn't activating So the bit is overheating due to friction. It is supposed to hammer the material you're drilling into dust then evacuate it, not rub it off through friction. You have to activate the hammer action. Pretty much the only use cases for not using the hammer action are when drilling into ceramic tile to avoid ...


22

If you are using a core bit with a shaft for which there's an extension, you'd probably have thought of that already. As far as I know there's no extension available for SDS plus or SDS max shanks. There are extensions for the "rope" threads and for the 5/8" and 7/8" threads on diamond core bits. The John Henry method is to drill as far as you can, then ...


17

A healthy 6" slab is probably robust enough to handle quite a bit of movement without cracking. You just need to lever it around, not lift it. (Maybe that's what you meant.) Clear all material away from the slab in the direction it's to be moved. Pothole at several locations on the "push" side of two corners about 12", tight to the slab. Insert a 6-foot ...


12

I have extended drills for one-off jobs by soldering (or welding / brazing) a piece of pipe (of a suitable diameter) to the end of the drill and putting an old drill into the other end of the pipe for the drive end. Need to go slow as they tend not to be perfectly straight :) but have got the job done...


8

The hammering action of the drill linked in the picture doesn't really need anything more than turning the dial to the hammer setting - it doesn't selectively "activate." It should be pretty noticeable but nothing that's going to bounce you out of your shorts. The mechanism is usually something like two plastic poker chips rotating, which gives you some ...


8

An SDS-plus hammer drill will make holes very fast using a bit that starts hardly sharp and rapidly becomes completely dull. It really doesn't care, because it's a pneumatic hammer action and the rotary action is just to clear away the dust. (It also works with masonry chisel bits if you turn the rotation off. An "ordinary" hammer/non-hammer drill had a ...


6

Make sure you have not accidentally set the drill in reverse mode. When the bit rotates the wrong way it causes the bit to heat up and wear out. Something similar to this happened to a friend and to myself.


6

Sumps typically have standing water, as Jasen mentions, part of the reason of having them is a sediment trap to prevent debris from going into the storm drain. All that "compost" didn't end up in the storm drain. You also likely don't want that compost entering your pipe and possibly getting a clog. A deeper sump pit means you have to clean it out less ...


5

The orange stain is likely an iron ochre infiltration due to high levels of iron in the soil or pre-existing iron in the cinder block. More info The paint is simply making the orange much more visible than it was on bare cinder block. I highly advise reading this article on basement finishing before continuing to paint your basement. You will likely have ...


5

If it doesn’t crack or break up while moving it it probably will later because the bottom side is never perfectly flat. Concrete is very brittle and has no shear strength that’s why we add rebar and wire mesh, even if you have reinforcements I would not try to move it.


4

You could drill another hole from the other side. It takes a bit of careful measurement to get the starting points lined up, and you have to make sure to keep the drill straight... To make sure you're lined up, you could drill a small pilot hole with a drill bit slightly over 4" long. If your pilot hole connects with the hole from the other side, you'll ...


4

I'm not sure how feasible this is but, here's an idea: you might want to look around for a 'mudjacking' service. Here's a video isn't great but should be enough to understand the process. This kind of service is typically used to level concrete but perhaps the approach could be used to float the slab. Then the slab could be rotated by other means. If ...


4

You might get some inspiration from some attempts at various slab moving jobs posted to YouTube. It's more translation than rotation in place but you can get a sense for how strong a slab is. Moving a Patio Slab -- fabricates a bolted down steel fixture pressed with a bottle jack, demonstrates the slab displaces. Sheers off a 1/2" 5/8" bolt, upgrades to 3/4"...


3

All sealers that I have worked with require a clean, dry, scale free, dust free surface. A vacuum cleaner should do the trick. As far as pre-coats, and "how to apply", you need to follow the directions on the particular sealer you're using. They all have their own specifications. Many sealers can be painted over, check the specs for your sealer. Certain ...


2

Last time I checked the installation instructions on a similar drain pit it said to fill the bottom with concrete. standing water, depending on the climate, can harbour mosquitoes, filling the sump prevents this. conversely the sump can trap debris preventing pollution of waterways so if there's a lot of crud that gets washed in there it might be a good ...


2

You really need a sealer. White is chosen to reflect the heat AND this will last longer than black. When we used hot tar on roofs we then painted them silver or white. If we did not do this the tar would end up in puddles. Primers are made to seal wood and wall coverings, not a concrete roof. You need a coating with some “body” that maintains flexibility ...


2

This is just a guess. I don't think there's going to be any muscling this around or moving it with prybars or etc. It's going to weigh 9000 pounds or so. Realistically I don't think it's going to happen. But anything's possible, of course. I tried to think of some ways this might be doable. Most of them were way more work than busting up the slab ...


2

1. Grab a flashlight 2. Find the service panel 3. Cut the power on the main breaker (or the top 6, or all of them) Now you'll need the flashlight. OK, now look at the panel labeling, and see if there are obvious "lighting" circuits. If there are, turn them back on, one at a time. After each one, walk around and check to make sure this didn't also turn ...


2

Almost certainly for drainage. Carrying any water leaking in from the walls to the sump. My understanding of radon mitigation would be that this gap and the sump pit need to be sealed from the top and power vented to the exterior. Any underslab drainage on the "basement" side should be connected to the vent system as well. If you already had a radon ...


2

You probably can fix this without having to damage the wall. This is a common problem, and there are inexpensive tools designed to remove any pieces of the shower arm left inside the wall in the fitting. You might be able to borrow one, but similar tools can be bought for less than US$10. Check your local hardware store or plumbing supply store. Unscrew ...


2

Yes, of course you can cut a trench through your concrete floor. Be sure that you locate any existing wires or pipes that are in the path of the cut. A concrete saw with water will keep the dust to a minimum. Using a wet/dry vac to immediately suck up the water/dust will also help. Be sure to seal off the space as best you can with plastic sheeting to keep ...


1

I'm posting this as a second answer for visibility, but depending on what part of the country you are in, you may have a "post-tensioned slab" foundation. This type of foundation has tension cables strung through it at regular intervals that provide a force to hold the foundation together and add strength. If you just start cutting into a post-tensioned ...


1

For a hole that diameter in concrete I'd strongly recommend a diamond core cutter. If it's a one-off operation, you can hire one, or you may even find a tradesperson who specializes in drilling such holes for builders and DIYers, using the right tool. Google is your friend. If it were brick or block, I'd look at buying a "longest" small diameter drill (...


1

The stains are minor, but may get worse over time due to moisture seeping through the porous concrete block from the outside. In order to have a dry basement, it is usually necessary to waterproof the foundation from the outside. This is generally not a DIY project since it involves digging all the way down to the footing in order to access the foundation ...


1

I think you answered your question when you stated "some type of plaster". That's exactly what it looks like to me. Plaster is usually applied over lath strips but can be applied straight to concrete but it doesn't last as long and is prone to crack, chip and damage to moisture. It is relatively easy to patch by just mixing more plaster, according to ...


1

As has been noted, if you can safely access the circuit breaker (usually a large panel on a wall looking something like this: I would flip the breakers to the appropriate rooms. They should hopefully be labelled to identify which breaker goes to which rooms. Note that sometimes a room can have multiple breakers to it. If you are really concerned you can ...


1

I worked alot of high rise concrete buildings in my day. when it came down to securing plates and bracing for the next level form work [concrete cast in place columns and walls] we would use a #8 duplex nail and a couple strands of wire 16 gauge I believe [rebar tie wire] drill a 3/16 hole using a real hammer drill with a real carbide tipped concrete bit and ...


1

I would definitely recommend gravel for the primary reason that it will drain moisture away from the shed more quickly than concrete. As far as the plastic grid+gravel method, I don't really have firsthand experience with that style of foundation; I'm more familiar with installing a treated wood perimeter filled with compacted gravel to place the shed on. ...


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