18

You could have caulked them a month after the slab was poured. You can caulk them now. Or vacuum/scrape them out and caulk them now. Saw-Cut control joints (as opposed to "tool-formed while the concrete was wet" control joints) are inherently sharp. They are less expensive than formed joints. They need to be deep enough to accomplish the goal of ...


10

Sounds like a hack-job approach to me. That wall could be built from concrete blocks (aka CMUs or concrete masonry units), with bond-block rows and reinforcing steel, and grouted full, making it effectively solid, without abandoning forms in place - or rather, the forms would be the block wall. Of course, poured concrete contractors and masons are not ...


7

So the question is it a live joint? A live joint is one where the ground is actually moving, and you can tell by careful examination of the bottom of the control joint. If there is no crack in the bottom of the control joint it is not live and can be filled with either mortar or caulk. if there is a crack in the bottom it is easier to assume that there is ...


6

It is possible to remove those forms. We did plenty of that when I worked for my dad. Usually contractors want to keep and re-use the form panels because they are expensive. There are only two real drawbacks to leaving the panels on the foundation: You will not be able to coat the exterior of the foundation wall with any waterproofing. Usually something ...


6

Check with a termite control company and/or the state agency that studies termite control. Also check with your homeowner's insurance company. Having all that buried wood would invite termites.


5

I don't understand why they were cut so sharp and deep For UTILITY not aesthetics. Sharp: That's how a segmented diamond blade cuts concrete. It's just the nature of the tool being used. Wide: The segmented diamond blade has a kerf size, apparently this one was about 1/4 inch. Deep: They wanted to make sure the stress cracks were controlled instead of being ...


5

What's not standard practice is for a wall to be poured so near another parallel foundation. That's a somewhat unique situation to begin with. Normally the floor system for an addition would rest on the original foundation unless there was a problem with the original. (I've since learned that the existing is a slab foundation. Obviously the new wall is ...


3

A mason's chisel is the traditional hand-tool approach. You might be able to find a "grit-edge" (tungsten carbide abrasive) blade for your sabre saw. You might get away with a tungsten carbide toothed blade for it, but that's more prone to get ruined than the grit-edge version.


3

OK, so you don't want to spend a lot of money. Get a 1/8" or 3/16" masonry bit and drill a series of holes along your cut line. Drill as deep and straight as possible. Have some water near by to keep the bit cool. It will take a while to do this and do is slow to not overheat the drill. Flip the stone over and drill more holes if the first side ...


3

I would absolutely be cutting concrete. You have an ideal opportunity to do so since you're overlaying the floor anyway. You don't want to deal with clogs later due to pipe reduction from an extension, and you want the stability a proper flange provides. Rent or borrow a diamond saw, cut out a 24" square, and fix this up right with a full-size pipe. ...


3

Place it in a trench 40 feet long with 18" of cover. In the future you can pull wires through it. (It' been a long week).


3

It isn't critical that all the concrete be sealed at once. It's essentially just a varnish, and while you may see variation in sheen where your applications overlap, it won't affect performance with most products. When in doubt read the label.


3

Backer Rod Sikaflex Self-Leveling Sealant Done. Perfect. I am in no way affiliated with this company; I am just a fan of it. https://retail.usa.sika.com/en/products/sealants/self-leveling/sikaflexr-self-leveling-sealant-0


2

I have used cardboard and styrofoam around pipes this helps in several ways and I would recommend at a minimum some heavy paper stock or cardboard and grease to allow for movement in desert or high temp zones. Just guessing based on the photo. No high water issues it is best to allow movement.


2

One possible solution is to cut the concrete and dig a trench for a drain between the patio and the door. As long as the water isn't too much to overflow that drain, it will work. But if your water problem is too much for such a drain, and I suspect it may be, the real solution is to remove the slab, grade the ground away from the garage, and then re-pour ...


2

To a large degree it depends on where you need to cut the block. These blocks are somewhat brittle -- they'll break quite readily where the sides intersect, but it'll be quite a trick to get a break in a controlled way somewhere in the middle of a cell. Not impossible to do with a hammer and chisel, but I can tell you it's going to be challenging. You'll go ...


2

Since you mention these come with floor safes, I'm going to guess that you're using these to anchor something.. a safe, perhaps.. to the floor. I'll also guess that the objective in anchoring the safe to the floor is to prevent the safe being lifted and carried away. These plastic anchors seem like they're semi-acceptable for a shear application such as ...


1

Throw the red shields out and get some metal lag shields at your home store similar to the one below but the correct size.


1

Take it to a place that specializes in selling and installing patios. They'll cut it for you.


1

$10 angle grinder and $2 concrete cutting wheels (or $10 diamond wheel) Find someone who is laying pavers, they'll have a large water cooled diamond saw. trade them a brewski for cutting your block on the mark. $2-$5 diamond hacksaw blades are a thing if you're patient. $5


1

Your question implies that standing water would occur in the cracks between slab segments. Generally speaking it won't. If there was that much of a seal under the concrete (due to clay soil or whatever), you won't prevent it with caulk. Water's much too wily for the likes of that. Joints like that exist for decades without undue distress from freeze/thaw ...


1

That may be (intended as) a termite barrier, and if so you don't want to trim it.


1

It looks like a lead or aluminum damp proof course between the nib wall and the framing. If that's what it is it can be trimmed, as DPC only needs to be between the concrete and the wood.


1

Certainly a fresh coat of paint costs little in money, time, and effort for the difference it makes as an impression on your potential buyers (do the floor too for best impact.) I've done this, and heard from the realtor afterwards... If you choose a light color (or white, my personal preference) it's much brighter, dust from raw concrete is reduced or ...


1

you want a toilet flange extension, this is a standard plumbing part. This is an example of an extension that seals to the I.D. of the existing waste pipe and gives you bolt-up capability at a new higher floor level. Not a product endorsement...


1

Your math looks right on. I couldn't verify the concrete but it looked pretty similar to other stuff I've used. The 12" Sonotube seems small for a 6x6 post. Their site recommends three time the post width so that would mean an 18" Sonotube. you might want to look into that. that means you have to do your calculations for concrete over again.. lol


1

Yes, you can only use such products to a certain depth. This is due to shrinkage and lack of aggregate, which means that thicker applications become rather weak. More importantly, though, is that those products are not intended as a finished flooring surface. They're soft and chalky when cured, and you're supposed to put actual flooring over the top. It will ...


1

To answer your question, the bottom of your footing needs to be a minimum of 12” below finish grade, where you live. However, I feel you don’t understand the complexity of this project so I’m going to layout a few issues you’ll need to resolve. First, this wall will weigh about 4,800 lbs. (plus weight of your stone veneer) so if it falls over it’s a ...


1

The answer is no. To be considered a finished basement there must be a wall covering around the "finished" part of the basement. If it were just concrete, well that is an unfinished basement. I have seen a lot of goofy things done including adding a 1/2" of plaster to all of the outer walls, putting drywall on basically shims, adding faux ...


1

Finish it anyway you want. Attaching fasteners to the wall for hanging TV's pullup bars, vaults for your gold bullion collection won't be a problem. You may want to paint the wall. Black maybe


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