3

It is a concrete sleeve anchor, many brands with similar names. You drill a hole, then pound it in, then twist the nut a few times to set it. If it has wiggles out then the hole is probably damaged and now oversized. You might find it best to now set a replacement deeper wedge anchor, or maybe set with a bit of epoxy. I don't remember what brand I was ...


3

Mount a 24" piece of 2x6 up there with four 3-1/2" lag screws and 4 2" lag shields, one in each corner.Then screw the bracket into that with two 1-1/4" lag screws. Use 3/8" lag screws for the header and bracket. Center the 2x6 over the hole in the concrete, Screws should be about 1" down and over or 1.4" diagonally from each corner. Washers are a good ...


3

If you drill too soon after pouring I've found that it tends to flake and crumble around the drill bit giving you a much larger hole than desired. After 24 hours, which makes it fairly hard, you should have no trouble at all.


2

If this was just a patio I'd say you have a good chance of getting some satisfactory results except for the fact that it would be about 2.5" above grade and there's be the possibility of tripping over it. This is a parking lot and driveway. You'll have cars driving over these slabs and parking on them. They will be shifting and sinking because of the weight ...


2

You can drill the hole after 24 hours, but it would be better to wait an extra day. In addition, the insert you use to hold anything down will readily break free if you tighten it down, even after 2 days. It would be better to wait a week before any kind of real torquing down of any kind of fasteners. If you are only needed to keep a plate from moving ...


2

Attaching ledger boards to a steel reinforced reasonably thick (12” or more) concrete pad is standard practice in deck construction. Use 4 1/2” concrete anchors 18” apart in a zig zag pattern - per engineered drawings for my high end deck projects


1

1) Part of the wall will be built on what is currently dirt in a planter area; the rest of the wall will extend onto existing pavers. Do I need to pour concrete in the planter as a foundation, level with the pavers? Or can I get away with compacting crushed gravel as a base in the planter? You'll need to do 'something' to deal with the overturning and ...


1

There are many types of concrete anchors available. Have you looked into them? Which you choose partly depends on the tools you have available. However, I'd consider freestanding shelves attached to the framing above. Since your plan is to use lag screws already, why not use anchors designed to accommodate them? This way you can use the same screws ...


1

No it's not necessary. Sealers protect the concrete aesthetically and help keep it from soaking up oil etc. Since you don't care what it looks like then you don't need to seal it.


1

NoSparksPlease answered your question about what type of bolt you had. I have always has better luck with lag shields and lag screws. They just seem to have more gripping power. Two 3/8" lag screws and two lag shields 2" long would be all you'd need. The drill size would be listed with the actual lag shield. With any luck, you might find a shield that fits ...


1

Gravel-lok is the product. It joins the pebbles without creating wierd color films or sandy debris. There is a spray on kind, but the can is a mixture you fold in like dough. The pavers would then be placed atop and a rubber mallet tapping would secure then let cure et voila wet look shiny perma pebbles.


1

ok so don't be so discouraged and give it a try. Maybe mix a small amount of cement and try it out somewhere else like a box lid and practice your timing and skill using the trowel. I have never touched concrete anything in my life and helped my hubby last yr with this exact repair! We got a smooth finish with just enough texture to sweep easy but keep ...


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