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4

In England, the regulation is Approved Document B of the Building Regulations 2019 In Wales, Approved Document B of the Building Regulations (Wales) and amendments In Scotland, Part 2 Building Standards technical handbook 2017 In Northern Ireland, Technical Booklets In general fire doors are not required inside dwellings of one or two storeys. In a three ...


4

I had a similar problem. I needed to go from a 2" hole to a 1" hole. I got a 2 1/4" hole saw and cut a hole through a piece of wood the same thickness as the door. I took the plug from the hole saw and glued it into the hole in the door. Sanded it, filled it in with a little wood putty and then drilled my 1" hole. Might be a little more work than you want to ...


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They are standardized! Your door is the standard! The doorknob is wrong. The people selling it to you should have had this conversation with you, and warned you that it probably won't fit your door. Take it back, let them learn their lesson.


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I think the most simple solution is this installed close to the ceiling: Assuming the surrounding paint is white, this really shouldn't require painting since it's one small hole and you could just use white wood filler to make the holes disappear once removed.


3

The garage door needs safety switches, as well as a reversing switch, a switch to detect end of travel (limit switch) and a switch to detect that correct force has been applied to keep the door closed. Simply turning the power to the whole door-opener on and off does nothing. If you want to use the Gosund outlet to bypass the remote control terminals, you'...


2

I don't think that gadget does that. It certainly will allow you to override with an actual key. Anyway, the thing you are looking for is a gadget that secures your door absolutely from the inside so nobody can unlock it. That is not what a deadbolt does. Deadbolts are designed to do that and also let people with keys through - that is the entire point ...


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This image is of a commercial product that you can buy cheaply, but you can make something on your own that performs the same task if you want. Basically, you can wrap a strap around the thumb turn of the deadbolt and tie that strap to your door knob: Item on Amazon The strap has a big mechanical advantage over the small amount of torque a key can apply ...


2

Nope. Mirror paint does not work that way. It's not a surface coating, it has to be molecularly smooth and that can't be painted on. Generally mirror coatings are on the glass itself, and on the backside. The fogged glass has already wrecked the possibility of doing that. Feel free to obtain actual mirror glass and replace the glass in your cabinets, ...


2

"water tends to flow towards the door" is your problem. The right way to fix this is to redo the exterior so water will flow away from the house. Sealing the gap would be a good secondary action, but if you leave it at that, you'll constantly be dealing with leaks.


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You need to prop the door into the upper track and then unscrew the bottom pin to tighten up the door. you might want to tighten up the upper track and fix that shim job.


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(Note that this door location isn't up to code. I'm assuming your house is rather old, but if it's not, it's indicative of other problems.) Do you need the door to actually latch? If not, you could get 1 "ball catch" or "roller catch", and 2 dummy door knobs. Instead of actually turning the doorknob, you just push/pull the door open. The catch keeps the ...


2

It is not worth it. Based on a ton of factors the hinge position is very very unlikely to line up right. External doors are all over the place on this and you don't want to be chiseling/routing your jamb and if going steel this isn't an option on the door. This doesn't even get into a 34" door is sometime 33 7/8" or that the door is a hair wider or ...


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I have used tooth picks and matches with glue for many years. With hard wood I use toothpicks as they are hard, match sticks with the head cut off work will work but I use those on soft wood like pine. I squirt the wood glue in push in however many I think I need then wipe the excess and insert the screws


2

Out of the three listed options I would use #3 as it is closest to the dowel method. I would also use longer screws if possible so that if only part of the hole is stripped the extra length can get more grip.


1

I might suggest a linkage system, assuming you don't mind having a lever actuator at least on the offset side of the door. Drill a hole in the end of the existing (lever) handle, put in a linchpin or equivalent, connect to a vertical bar; do the same X inches down to a faux-lever handle. This lower handle is then mounted to a pin or axle where the latch ...


1

I would go for the dowel method. Support the door, move that face of the hinge out of the way, drill, and fit dowel with glue. Let dry, pilot drill and then use good screws.


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The one you have there was built into the door frame as a unit. You wouldn't find that exact part unless you contacted the manufacturer. I would simply see what your local hardware or home improvement store has on hand. The crest of the curve needs to mate well with your door's bottom seal or sweep. Other than that it's not terribly critical. You'll have ...


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I've installed that brand/model of door closer before, and it doesn't have a hold open function as far as I know. You'll want a floor stop, or get a different door closer that has a hold open function.


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Since you're going to replace it anyway, drill a small hole in it. It's the only way to convince your dad. You can easily patch the hole afterwards. Good luck.


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Maybe I'm old school,(or just old), but I'd cut the two inches of the bottom and then replace the solid framing piece I cut off with a new piece or run the old piece through a planner a few times to remove the panel and glue and screw it back together.


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The answer depends on whether it is hollow or solid. If it is hollow then you need to find out how much is solid on each end. If it is solid then there is no issue. For example, taking one door somewhat randomly from Home Depot based on Interior Door + Hollow Core + not pre-hung: This one is hardwood rather than MDF, but that really shouldn't matter much. ...


1

The sliding screen door is completely independent of the the sliding glass door. There is no need to remove the glass door to install a screen door. If you are not experienced at removing sliding glass doors and you try to do so, even with a helper, you risk damaging the door and personal injury. The light sliding screen doors I am familiar with have two ...


1

Some magnetic catches have neat functions like push in release and the door opens enough to allow fingers to open the door, when closing pushing in fully closes the door, I like those more than the mechanical style. As far as life of the hardware I have remodeled 20’s & 30’s houses that had the mechanical clasps that were still functional so I think ...


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The magnetic ones are simpler imho, and don’t have so much to catch a sleeve on. Also, the tongue on the mechanical one can deform over time.


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Make a 2” return on each end or 4” one end to support the sliding units which takes up the extra space. Now you have added the picture I would go for the 4” - designed to match the shelf or just completely box-in that end... but that shelf area could be useful.... Some shower screens don’t go the full length of the bath anyway - I fitted one that is 2/3 of ...


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