Hot answers tagged

37

The two hinges are not exactly one above each other, in 3D. One of them is slightly left, right, front or back, relative to the other. As such, the line going through both hinges forms a vector in space. If this vector is not straight up, when the door rotates around it, the door will go higher or lower. Gravity is pulling the door down. As such, it will ...


34

The casing is very thin and its purpose it to keep the bearing's balls in place, protect them from dust and grime and to hold in some lubricant. It doesn't share any load. The hinges are very durable as the friction load is much less than with a regular hinge. They are also quieter. Below are a few diagrams on what might be inside a ball bearing hinge: ...


20

Wood glue, hands down. Wood glue is designed to penetrate the wood for a tighter bond. Properly done, wood glue is stronger than the surrounding wood. I have chairs I've wood glued and clamped and they're still fine years later. Epoxy is OK, but you have to make sure you get the right epoxy too. Many are exothermic (they get hot) and might eat your wood. ...


17

The most likely causes are a tilt in the wall or a poorly hung jamb. In either case the hinge jamb is out of plumb. In your case it's leaning toward the center of the door swing. The door slab is actually lower in that partially-open position, so that's where gravity puts it. This is more common with solid-core doors, which are much heavier and therefore ...


15

The casing is just to stop the balls falling out. It doesn't take any of the vertical load. Inside the case there is a series of ball bearings arranged around the hinge pin. The ball bearings take all the load. When the hinge is turned, the balls rotate. The result is that there is no sliding of metal surfaces over each other, so there is very much ...


11

There's a huge amount of mess and potential for damage during the hanging, taping, and painting stages. You wouldn't want some of your most expensive and vulnerable woodwork hanging around through that. Also, the hangers will likely use rotary cutters to zip around door openings. You make that much harder for them if even bare jambs are in place (and again ...


9

Always seen hanging doors as one of the “final fix” jobs so they don’t get hit by stuff being carried around. Also means the doorways are wider and less obstructed...


7

That enclosure is a NEMA 3R, it is designed to be out in the weather. It should be set out to the outside edge of the stucco or cement siding. With it inset, water will get inside the structure because you need to open the panel by Code. Code does allow for a box to hang outside the structure and have a hole drilled in the outside bottom for drainage. Since ...


6

In the UK it's a rising butt hinge when you open the door it rises slightly when it opens and the weight of the door makes it close. This looks like a normal hinge. Note the slight wedge between the two parts of the hinge.


5

On commercial jobs with steel door frames and steel studs, you install the door frames when framing the walls. Then you hang drywall, tape, paint, then hang doors. On residential jobs with pre-hung doors and wood studs, you frame walls, hang drywall, tape, paint walls then install door frames with pre-hung doors, then install the rest of the millwork.


3

In the hole in the bottom of the handle there is a screw, an allen or slotted, that has to be loosened to remove the handle. Then the other handle should pull out with the stem. The slide bolt then can be pulled out since you've already removed the screws.


3

Make the axle of the wheel intersect the axis of rotation of the door through the hinges.


3

Wood glue, always. Sandpaper the dowel and hole to give a better surface for the glue to hold.


2

Many shower doors have adjustment built into the frame or stiles at the wall. Usually the door fastens to a box section with sits tightly into a 'C' section. Once the door is fitted and adjusted the box section is 'locked' into place by drilling holes into the box section through pre-drilled holes in the 'C' section. Small self tapping screws and plastic ...


2

Wood glue works well; when cured it can flex a little as can wood itself. Epoxies tend to be rather brittle. Epoxies vary a lot: slower epoxies (e.g. Araldite Precision) are (i) much less exothermic, and (ii) liquid for long enough to soak in a little. They need the parts to be held stably together during curing. They should be stronger than fast epoxies ...


2

For installing a dowel in the hole I'd prefer wood glue. However, given that the objective is not to plug an unwanted hole with a dowel but rather to repair a screw hole... The hole could be filled with epoxy alone - no filler wood. The hole is drilled out oversize and then filled with just epoxy. An interesting outcome of the epoxy solution is that the ...


2

For minor repairs I have used lacquer sticks with much success. There are videos of people who really know how to use the sticks to make repairs like you need. You could try it yourself with practice. The sticks are not a big investment. Paint could be used too, as in faux finish, but that is definitely an acquired touch.


2

This would be better as a comment, but I don't have enough rep to do that. When your garage was remodeled, was the garage door taken off? Looking at the latches that @beswald mentioned, it looks like the door was removed in segments, and the segment with the latches was reinstalled upside down. The latches appear to be below center in that section. You can ...


2

It's a very straightforward calculation, though parts of the industry prefer to pretend otherwise. Also, math is involved, and that tends to scare off people with math scars from school. Dumbed down approaches give dumbed down, generalized answers. First, establish if you are dealing with Metric or "English" (BTU based) R values. They are similar but the ...


2

My preferred choice is to hang and finish the drywall, clean the hell out of the area top to bottom, prime and paint both coats of finish on the walls. Then after everything else is done, go through and touch up any problem areas with the paint. If the area gets carpeted I like to let the carpet go in before the last coat of paint. The number of touch ...


1

Yep, the old stuff sure is worn out. I'd go with the peel and stick foam rubber weather-stripping. Those, have the most thickness options to get you to better than new. Since, they block air completely where a felt, pile or wool never did. Keep in mind that weather-stripping is only air sealing and really not thermal insulation. So, you'll want maybe just a ...


1

If you're going to use trim on the door frame it doesn't much matter the order you do it. Before - You can paint the opening freely without the frame in the way After - The trim will cover any paint gotten on the frame facing into the room The exception here might be an exterior door. You'll almost always install these before you drywall, let alone paint. ...


1

Since you've already installed it, you're "in for a penny, in for a pound". First, deal with that cross brace. That is designed to prevent that wall from falling down sideways in wind or earthquake. Pull it out and lop off 1/2" of one end (on the diagonal, of course). Reinstall it and it should sit about an inch lower. Then go ahead and fit up ...


1

Look for roi on replacement windows and doors. Here is one such article Also, “are high efficiency windows worth it” led me to this article. Also: energy.gov and an interesting story from NPR


1

I had the same problem and just tried wd40 and it worked!! Remember to wipe up any excess that drips on to your flooring though 😊


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