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61

This is a job for vise grips. What I would do is file the bolt flat on two sides. Don't take off so much that you significantly compromise its strength - just flatten the threads. These flat sides will enable you to grip it with a pair of large vise grips. That should provide sufficient leverage to remove the bolt. Take it a bit at a time.


26

Say you try one of the other proposed approaches in the other answers and the screw is just stubborn and more of the shaft keeps snapping off... Consider that you might not need to remove the screw at all. In a worst case, you can almost always snap off the screw close to the base of the wall (maybe a little grinding with a rotary tool like a Dremel to fully ...


18

I would just clamp my drill's chuck on that puppy and spin it out.


15

Another possible strategy; if you can get 2 nuts onto the threaded bar and turn them against each other they will practically lock into each other, this should allow you then to use a regular spanner, shifter or vice grips to loosen and remove the bolt. Make sure your only turning the first nut and not the second or the effect is lost. If you have it a ...


11

Use a plumber wrench. In general more force and better fit jaws for the task than vise grips: Edit upon comment by jay613: Since it's 5" wood. Drill a hole next to the screw, file the screw and then use the wrench. Or save the money by not buying the wrench and go for the answer by jay613 (saw or drill several holes). I also found out that it may be ...


11

Some of the other answers are worth trying but IMO a 1/4" lag bolt embedded 5 inches in wood, presumably without a pilot hole, and tightened to the point the head broke off is not coming out with any reasonable effort. I'd saw it off and work around it .... 2 minutes of relatively little effort.


10

TL;DR: Other options (described below) include: (1) Chuck bolt directly into drill. (2) Cut slot in bolt and use screw driver. (3) Cut flats on bolt and use socket driver. (4) Use two nuts to provide gripping surface. (5) Destructive brute force with a hammer. (5b) Destructive brute force with a crowbar. (6) Cut the bolt flush to the wall. (7) Keep the bolt ...


7

Use two nuts (if the thread is damaged so that you can't put any nut on, saw off a small part of the end), fasten them against each other, then use your spanner on one to turn the bolt. This is so standard a practice that it's routinely used to fasten or remove studs that don't have a bolt head to start with. :-)


4

I'm sorry, but we have to talk about legalities. Especially given the high risk here. You are not a licensed electrician and that places limits as to what you may do. You CAN do work the AHJ deems trivial, such as changing receptacles, switches and light fixtures. You CAN diagnose and test, take deadfronts off panels and poke around with a voltmeter - ...


4

I assume the lamp has a screw socket for the bulb. In this case, the hot wire connects to the contact at the bottom of the socket and the neutral connects to the screw shell. You may be able to examine the socket to see which connects where. Otherwise, you’ll need a way to determine electrical continuity (ohm meter, continuity tester, battery and flashlight ...


4

One option is to use a hacksaw or a rotary tool with a cutting wheel to carve a groove into the end of the bolt, effectively turning it into a flathead screw. You can then use a regular screwdriver to back it out. If the end of the bolt is boogered up too badly, it might help to file it smooth first. You have 5 inches of screw firmly anchored into a stud ...


3

this bolt is made of weak metal. you have to be very careful. use a small diameter metal pipe. carefully bend the bolt towards the wall. Slide the pipe over the bolt and rotate counterclockwise. when bending the bolt, heat it if there is a tool for this. this will reduce the chance of the bolt breaking.


3

A small (10 inch) pipe wrench should make quick work of this situation. It's designed to literally grab onto smooth round steel tubes.


2

I think this might be more of an opinion type question but I would just repair the corner and fill the small section where the paper ripped off. Fill it put a layer of tape let it dry, put a new corner in mud let dry sand and a can of texture should fix it up. If messy with the mud it may take more sanding. If you cut a section out there will be more repair ...


2

I would demo the entire back splash area removing all the Sheetrock. Trying to save 10$ (about a sheet) makes no sense to me because the Sheetrock gets damaged or has residue on it. I would rip& strip the tile and Sheetrock out and then if replacing with Sheetrock use green board or if tile use backer board to replace the Sheetrock. Replacing a large ...


2

Those fasteners are called cam locks or cam bolts. Here are photos of a cam lock nut and a cam lock bolt (or screw, or stud). Your photo shows quite a large gap, especially at the lower left. Cam lock fasteners are not intended to draw a joint closed; they really should only hold it snug after the pieces have been fully pressed together. Try rotating the ...


2

Channel-Lock Or Vice-Grip Groove-Lock pliers will take care of this.


1

First try the vise grip and it might unscrew it. If not, cut it off near the surface and then use a good drill bit designed to drill metal and slightly larger in diameter to the bolt and drill it down to slightly below surface so your spackle patch repair is seamless.


1

Seeping moisture or leaking from cracks, either one is not good. Yes, sealing and or patching will be much easier but it's something you'd have to do every year as the problem gets worse. If those boards have been exposed to moisture over the years, they are probably starting to rot from the insides. Give them a good pressure cleaning and check them out more ...


1

There is probably a pocket or thick point there I probably would not mess with them as some may be connected. I probably would get some white paint and paint that area white, the tar is getting hot and bubbling up. White will help it to reflect the heat and not bubble up making a low point.


1

If you can’t get the tail out of the basin pop up /drain stopper you may need to replace the entire drain assembly. Don’t panic only about 12.00$ at the big orange home store “pop up assembly” by easy flow is one inexpensive one that will work. First remove the drain pop up lever unscrew the plastic and pull the rod out the back. the rod is held in place by ...


1

I like to use threaded inserts, especially when the original material was particle board which is not good at holding screws in the first place. I've fixed a ping-pong table, a cheap folding table, and the extended footrest for a reclining chair by screwing a brass threaded insert into the old hole. Once the stripped hole was just right to take the outside ...


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