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34

It looks like a cosmetic DIY patch-job was already attempted before. The current situation is exactly how you can expect your attempt to turn out. This is a structural issue and I would hire a professional. Odds are very high that an entire section of wall will need to be removed and a new wall made of block will be installed. Prepare yourself and your ...


21

I did that once as a kid and my father fixed it with some epoxy. If you buy a good water-proof two-part epoxy it should seal the lines nicely until you can replace the sink bowl.


19

It seems like you can use old "bowl in a sink" solution


11

I hate "not answering the real question" but I also hate people wasting their time. Instead of spending 20-30 dollars on 2 part epoxy and maybe making this waterproof AND chancing a small leak ruining the cabinet... You don't only have a chunk missing but you have a pretty good crack line running there too. Please spend that time and energy to ...


10

The first step of repairing a deteriorated wall is to knock loose and remove the bad materials to the solid base. However, in your case, I suspect there is nothing solid that remains, as the cracks are likely to have penetrated through the thickness of the wall, the removal, and refilling of the defects will require significant efforts, so a professional is ...


7

I would: Apply a bead of construction adhesive such as Loctite Power Grab to the exposed edges of the porcelain Put the broken porcelain back into place Duct tape it from the underside Cut a piece of lumber and put it under the broken piece so that it can apply pressure upwards A tensioned curtain rod would also do the trick if you can find one short ...


4

I would use some silicone adhesive caulking to glue the piece in place and then use some strong tape underneath to hold it in place. You might have to wedge a board underneath to hold the piece in as it dries if tape doesn't stick. Smear some of the silicone liberally over all the cracks inside the sink once the piece is in place. It won't be pretty or ...


3

SmoothSeam corner available on Pella 350 Series products only. Page 5 of the Pella Window & Door Guide (PDF) There you have it. You didn't buy what you thought you bought. Bummer. Regarding the photo of the brochure that was added later, it may be a faulty early version of this one, which lacks the reference to the 250 series window shown in the image ...


3

If the gas line merely runs in and stops, it's fine. Hopefully you have a screw-type connector where it goes into the fireplace combustion area. If so, just wrap a galvanized pipe stop in some PTFE and it should be fine. I would leave it in the fireplace wall because It's already plumbed You can turn that line off It does offer some value if you ever sell ...


3

The proper way is to replace the piece, but this is either laborious if you have to replace planks until you get to the damaged one, or it is very difficult and risks damaging the rest of the flooring, especially if you attempt lifting it out by lifting and wiggling the whole floor. This assumes it's a click-in type. If you have an extra piece for ...


2

Is this level of quality control typical from Pella? I've installed 5 Pella 250 windows in my home between 2018 and 2021. 2018 2021 Your experience seems consistent with mine. I never read the sales brochure so I guess my expectation wasn't inflated and the seam is just like countless other vinyl windows I've seen.


2

Deck If the 4x4 posts were up to code for when the deck was built then your proposal would be considered a repair and repairs usually have looser guidelines. Yes, adding 6x6 posts next to the 4x4 posts would be a huge safety improvement and likely exceeds current code so that's super! Your main consideration is whether you are okay with the look of doubled ...


2

Caveat: I'm not a structural engineer, or a builder. If you want to answer the "how can I DIY this?" question, the answer is to get a structural engineer to draw up some plans for how you can temporarily brace the weight of the house so you can remove one portion of the wall at a time until you have a new foundation that will stand up to the ...


2

I used a pair of 10" pipe grips used in reverse i.e opened outwards into the broken glass ring, I managed to turn the glass a little before it broke into 2 pieces. this took about 10 seconds to do. Power was turned off and goggles worn.


2

Too much for a comment, doesn't quite answer the actual question, but contains information the OP should be aware of. Where the flexi-hose attaches to the solid pipe, the installer should have put small in-line shut-off valves [You should have one of these behind every tap in the house]. Either someone skimped at your expense, or they're not compulsory in ...


1

Looks like it's nailed to the wall with finish nails in the supports. The shelves themselves are probably nailed to the supports with finish nails, and may have some nails that are angled into the sheetrock too. I would bet that it's got some kind of caulking or adhesive in there as well. I'd take a sharp knife and score around the entire thing, all the ...


1

You'll want to remove any crumbling plaster. There's probably lath strips up there so just mix up some plaster and fill in the area. Any gouges in the ceiling can be filled in with plaster. I'd be against using any type of glue mixture to stabilize crumbling plaster. You wouldn't then be able to sand it smooth and paint probably wouldn't stick to it. That's ...


1

The best solution, as long as the area is already exposed, is to replace all brass fittings that had been mated to iron nipples. I did try cleaning out the female threads of the upper left brass tee using toothpicks and a wire brush, and installing a new brass nipple with PTFE tape. After adding a new shut-off valve and pressurizing the line, the work seemed ...


1

Tape the piece back firmly in place from below, possibly having a helper press it upward for you or wedging something against it. Then, use Loctite 420 or a similar extremely-low-viscosity CA glue product that's designed to wick into cracks and rapidly dry. You can remove excess with a razor blade and/or a paper towel soaked in acetone. It's good to have ...


1

Screw an old v belt around the pully to a 2X4 or chunk of wood as tight as you can; I put wooden shims and screwed them into the inside diameter, and the belt to the shims to make it super tight so the pully wouldn't move. Then just attach the wrench and whack it as hard as you can with a mallet to knock it loose. It worked for me when nothing else would.


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