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12

The most common cause of melting/burned terminals is a failure in the heating element. These often fail in a way that allows the heating element, which is encased inside a metallic tube with an insulating layer, to make electrical contact with the tube. In most cases when this happens, it causes excess current to be drawn from the panel and the circuit ...


5

The photo appears to be of a very old, possibly nickel-plated brass fixture with the plating worn off and a significant copper-based corrosion process ongoing. I doubt that you'll find any quick fix here as you'll either need to replace it entirely or completely disassemble it, remove all corrosion from it, re-plate it as appropriate, and replace all of its ...


4

Does "sticky" mean it is hard to turn? If so ,pretty easy fix ; remove the handle, unthread the packing nut/collar on the stem, replace packing or make your own by putting several wraps of teflon tape-pipe dope on the stem , reassemble. Adjust the collar/nut tightness to seal and give the amount of turn resistance you want.( This is all done with ...


3

That does look like heat damage. It's possible that if the disposal jammed and the cord was pressed against something that the current draw heated the wiring enough to melt the housing like that. UNPLUG THE DISPOSAL AND DON'T USE IT UNTIL THE CORD HAS BEEN REPLACED Under your sink, in a wet location, having exposed wires is very dangerous. Your disposal may ...


2

There's really only 2 ways to address this issue: Do it properly and replace that section of conduit. This will require removing the wires, but it is a permanent and visually appealing fix. Get a split coupling or repair clamp and solvent-weld or fasten it over the damaged area. Repair Clamp: Split Coupling:


2

If the curve is formed by the framing (only) and the glass itself is flat, the realm of "reasonably possible without breaking the bank" is active. Actual curved glass is typically insanely expensive (if you are not a furniture factory buying a large amount of it) for reasons that are not hard to figure out - each radius of curvature would be a ...


2

If the issue is limescale that has built up over the years, then vinegar is the miracle solvent that will dissolve it for you. Any weak acid will do, but vinegar is cheap is readily available. You can either put it on a sponge and scrub or else apply it to tissue paper and leave for a few hours or overnight. You could even put some in your kettle and boil ...


2

Try searching for a "half moon nut". You'd also do fine with a regular round metal washer.


1

You can do some testing on the disposal. With the breaker off, see if you can rotate the inside plate, use a broom handle or similar item. There is also a reset button on the outside bottom of the disposal, make sure it's pressed in. There should also be a hole in the middle of the outside bottom where you can fit an allen wench, I think a 1/4", to turn ...


1

It's hard to say from the out-of-focus photo, but I'd give equal likelihood to overheating (due to arcing or motor failure) and physical damage. That scuff looks vaguely like what you'd see if a drawer or something pinched the cable or repeatedly rubbed against it. The bottom line is that it needs to be replaced as the copper conductor looks nicked. Whether ...


1

That part of the window is known as the "muntin", so these would be "curved muntins" - although I couldn't find much about them. From the pictures you posted, it appears to be some kind of thin plywood, with the outer layers oriented perpendicular to the window surface to better bend. Veneer is definitely also an option, and probably ...


1

The sill plate is used as a transition from the wood walls to the foundation for vertical loads AND horizontal (shear) loads. Yes, you can use a new sill plate placed on the inside of the wall (with anchors in it to hold it down to the foundation wall,) but the exterior wall sheathing needs to fasten into it too. Horizontal shear is to resist wind and ...


1

I purchase quite a few spray nozzles a year for work. Water, windex, citrus cleaners and even cutting oil are most of my uses I find chemical resistant rated spray nozzles work best or the spring and ball start rusting and fail quickly. It sounds like your nozzle has some solids blocking it taking it off a squirt or 2 then rinse the cap may fix it , with all ...


1

I have found sheets of neoprene rubber, silicon rubber and the high temp stuff that looks like card board on line. On my nail gun senco they wanted ~22 for the replacement gasket plus shipping , I tried silicon sheet two soft blew out, neoprene rubber sheet it has held up I ordered a bunch of thickness but ended up using 1/16” exacto knives are really handy ...


1

Yes, a sharp knife, cutting board, steady hand, good marking out, patience and of course suitable material. Made gaskets for many things using paper, card, plastic etc One source of plastic useful in the past was a milk container, but temperature is a consideration.


1

It's done-for. Whenever you have both severe surface degradation and spider cracks there's no turning back time. No patch will hold up with so many independently-movable segments. You'd have to pour a new slab that's robust enough to span such movement. If it didn't cause problems at the door opening you could lay paver bricks over the top. They'd do pretty ...


1

What you consider "not ideal" is the correct method, but when you replace it, use Schedule 80 rather than schedule 40 (what this looks to be), it's much more resistant to damage. Or rigid (which is effectively rather well-galvanized iron pipe.) For a hack job since this is presumably low voltage and a hack job might be OK, choose a section of ...


1

You have a couple options, but only one will make it look truly right without creating an oddly-shaped fascia or a ski jump in your roof. You'll need to raise the rafter tails. They're likely low in the middle because either the wall is sagging or the rafters weren't cut or fit well to begin with. I would examine how the rafters are fastened to the wall ...


1

Here are some general guidelines. This sort of work needn't be complex. Loose paint and plaster must be removed. Repairs made over them are likely to fail. Securely-bonded paint does not need to be removed. Glossy surfaces should be scuffed or etched, or should have a bonding primer applied before repairs. If moisture isn't a common problem, standard joint ...


1

I popped the inner seal on the door (facing inward) the latch had a spring that was detached because thplastic hook for it broke. I bent a wire and drilled a small hole in the latch piece and reattached the spring. If I didn’t have to figure it out, it would take 15 minutes. It took me an hour.


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