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5

Likely "removable caulk", (perhaps "temporary caulk" - been a few years since I put some on leaky windows for the winter) in which case pulling it once you get an edge lifted up should be effective at removing it, though perhaps complicated by it being a sloppy job... Otherwise, just (clear?) caulk, and it might be harder to remove. Using a knife will risk ...


3

From what I can see in those images, I wouldn't bother repairing that drywall until the new door is in. Sometimes hanging/fitting a door requires a lot of work to get it plumb, straight, and level, and that may cause you to damage what you just repaired. Once the new door is installed, you can see how the wall will need to be repaired relative to the new ...


2

I had the same problem, with the light protector broken a few millimetres from the thread so there wasn't much to grip to remove it. After trying a number of the suggestions here and elsewhere I ended up doing what I was hoping to avoid. I attacked it directly with a hammer. (Initially, I tried using a screwdriver between the hammer and glass but the glass ...


2

I just had the same problem. My successful method was to warm the remaining glass and metal housing with a hairdryer, it took several goes to soften the grease etc. Then I had a small plastic tub of my granddaughters play-doh in a drawer which is around 2” diameter at the base and tapers towards the lid. By inserting that inside the broken cover, pushing up ...


2

I recently purchased a brand new GE refrigerator and it was making a terrible noise about once an hour that sounded like a metal fan hitting something. Turned out it was because the ice maker was in the on position and the waterline hadn't been hooked up yet. However even when I called the store they didn't seem to know that would be why I was getting that ...


2

That looks pretty busted up, and I'm guessing you want to fix it, and making it stronger than it was it more inportant than making it look good as new. MDF and chipboard are weak in edge-grain, so for durable connections screw into (and preferable through) the faces not into the edges. What you do is get some 20mm x 2mm aluminum angle that's as long as ...


2

As requested: modern electronic ballast have safety circuits that shut them down when the lamps are drawing two much current. Replacing weak lamps may solve the problem.


2

Honestly, if it were me, I would get a 12VDC power supply... bring 12V up to the cobra head, and then put segments of high-density LED strip where that reflector is now. I'd use double density (120 LED/metre) strip material, and hand-cut them to a custom length and solder on #24 wires to each strip. If you want to make it dimmable, add a 12V dimmer ...


2

There are several different sizes of lamps that fit that pin out. The ballast is probably in the base and will have a list of compatible lamps if that is lost, many times when a lamp goes bad it can take out the ballast, so the ballast probably is bad, the voltages you mention are two low to strike the lamp.


1

Ecuador is kind of on the fuzzy edge of 120V/NEC territory, so you might have Euro 230V in places. The ACSR service drop is providing netural, not ground. If the neutral wire breaks, it's perfectly normal for neutral to float up at hot voltage. That's why we insulate it. The problem with bootlegging ground off neutral is now, all the grounds in the ...


1

One way is to drill out, re-tap and fit a helicoil to the required thread. Do make sure that this will be strong enough for the purpose. Of course, it may be possible to find the correct pitch bolts for the original.


1

I would verify the screw that connects the blower to the blower motor is tight, I have seen where a loose fan (squirrel cage) slipping has caused this exact issue. I don’t have time to look it up right now but there is usually a maintenance over ride some times the plastic cutout that looks like a horizontal I on the right lower side. This may allow you to ...


1

Put a drop of super glue on the bare shaft, then slide the impeller fully into place. Put the nut on without gluing it. Leave it for an hour so the glue can set up. You could also use a threadlocker liquid on the shaft. I have repaired loose impellers for combustion air fans inhigh efficiency furnaces. I also use this repair for bath fans and rangehoods.


1

I'd add 2 horizontal pieces of 2x4 to the exterior of each side piece. One at the top and one at the bottom. These pieces would extend past the end of the foot board by 1.5". I'd then add two vertical pieces of 2x4 to the exterior of the foot board. Then I'd screw the verticals to the horizontals. Then I'd chip out all the broken crap and fill it with ...


1

First I'd try to cosmetically repair the footboard as good as possible with some wood glue, especially the top part. Then position the footboard like it originally was and drill through the sides into the footboard about 2 or 3 inches from the damaged areas and about 4" deep. Get yourself some lag screws and screw the bed back together. Normally I'd say to ...


1

Actually the only real issue is the lack of isolation valve on the recirculation connection, resulting in the constant water supply to the water heater. Depending on the age of your Navien NPE-A model, he did you a favor. You need a crossover valve installed under one of your faucets that is far away from the water heater (there are a few different styles ...


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