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43

Leave a gap and use a cornice(crown) molding to cover it.


28

As long as they are normal screws and you unscrew them they won't compromise the studs or their integrity. If you rip the screws out (with a hammer for example) that could compromise the studs. If you plan on reusing the exact same holes there are things you can do to help future screws grip just as well by adding toothpicks to the holes, but otherwise you ...


25

Yes, you can remove the brace because: The wall is non-load bearing (not carrying a load) The diagonal brace is not secured in a manner to transfer any load at the top or bottom The diagonal brace is not secured to top plate The diagonal brace is not secured significantly to vertical stud...the picture cuts off a portion of the brace that crosses the stud ...


23

No, it's not ok. For one thing, by the time the city inspector looks at the fully framed building, it will be a little too late to fix it. Secondly, the builder's attitude seems very questionable. Either his framing crew or the concrete sub messed up. At the very least their job is not done in a workmanlike manner. They shouldn't wait and hope things 'slip' ...


22

If this is a load-bearing wall you'll want to frame the pet door in, just like you would a window. This will allow you to properly carry the load down, and around the pet door. The king studs should go all the way from the top plate, down to the bottom plate. The header will be made up of 1/2" plywood/OSB, sandwiched between two 2x4s. If you don't want to ...


22

Many community colleges offer construction trade courses. Have a chat with the instructor, he can often offer enthusiastic young students who are ready and willing to provide some sweat as an on-the-job learning opportunity. The students get class credit, the only cost to you is to buy them lunch and provide water, no insurance/license, etc. required ...


22

I think your husband just wants the shoe bins to remain where they are and doesn't want to buy new ones.. LOL. Removing the screws will not damage the studs even if they were load bearing. Patch the holes with a vinyl spackle, sand lightly and you're good to go.


17

Yes, but not just for rigidity. Cement board is made of, well, cement - and cement is brittle. When you screw the cement board in you create a pressure point or stress point. Even though the board is screwed in with lots and lots of screws, each screw hole is a stress point prone to breakage. By gluing the board as well as screwing, you ensure that a ...


16

If you're in the US, and you want to work within the bounds of the law, contact a 'construction temp agency'. They'll have insurance and workers comp. They might seem expensive on an hourly basis, but probably worth the peace of mind.


16

That wall is load bearing; it is helping to support the stairs and that landing. As such, it can be subjected to significant load (think two 250 lb guys, plus heavy furniture, for starters). More importantly, it is subject to lateral impulses from people and things going up and down the stairs so it should have lateral/diagonal bracing to help stop "...


15

Normally rough opening is 2 inches larger then the nominal door size. This leaves approximately 1/4" on each side for shimming to plumb. Some carpenters prefer 2-1/2", leaving a 1/2" gap for shimming. In case framing isn't very precise (say when using unskilled volunteer labor), 1/4" can sometimes be inadequate.


14

If it is not too large of wall I would recommend removing all the old drywall and its fasteners. Then I would shim out the studs with extension strips that even out the wall with the top plate. You may find that not all of these shims are uniform in dimension of any of the studs are bowed or out of plumb. The shims are easily ripped from a 2x4 or 2x6 using ...


13

The reason that joists are sistered using the same height of wood is simply space; generally there's no extra room. If you've got nothing below and there's space then there's no reason you can't use a taller piece of wood. Things to keep in mind: Spanning as much distance as you can so you transfer the load as evenly across the original joist. If it's too ...


12

If the 2X stock is part of the supporting structure such as a wrap or beam attached to a post, it must be secured by a threaded device, not nails unless it is held by a metal support. Local codes vary a lot on this type of connection, but IRC simply calls for a threaded device in applications like this. A through bolt is always a good choice, but sometimes ...


12

OK this is easy. The answer is NO. The construction has issues: There are no bolts for the sill plates. 2.The sill plates should be spaced on the slab so that wall plus exterior finish meets slab. It looks like this house is getting brick or thick stone given the 3 inches or so from the edge. I am not sure about your situation. You are having a ...


11

You could use one of the many variations of the mortise and tenon joint, depending on the look you're going for. Though I agree with HerrBag, that the strength of a mortise and tenon joint should not rely on glue. Tusk Tenon This is a through tenon variation, where a wedge is used to lock the joint together. Fox tail (Wedged) Tenon This is another ...


11

No, the wall between the home and garage is designed and built as an interior wall. HOWEVER, it is a fire wall. Your code in Oregon requires 1) fire rated door between the spaces, and 2) fire rated wall "assembly", and 3) insulation. 1) The door needs to be fire rated door and frame, which can be a solid core door and a solid wood frame (not a frame with ...


10

Roofing nails are a bad choice for attaching sheathing. The wire gauge is too small and the hardness of the nail shank is much less than a framing nail. I personally like to use 6d or 8d ring shank nails for OSB. 8d common nails are Ok as well. Ring nails won't loosen or back out over time as wood dries and shrinks. The heads of the roofing nails can easily ...


10

The brace is providing lateral support. If you build a wall with the top and bottom plate plus some studs, it's easy to shift the wall out of square and turn it into a parallelogram. Under load, a house would take an 8' shift to one side and flatten to the ground. With the brace, the wall remains square and holds perpendicular walls plumb. In typical ...


10

International Residential Code 2012 Chapter 6 Wall Construction Section R602 Wood Wall Framing R602.7 Headers. For header spans see Tables R502.5(1) and R502.5(2). So if you're on the top floor, you can use 2 2x4's (unless the building is 36' wide, in which case you'll need 2 2x6's). If you have a floor above, you'll need 2 2x6's (...


9

Pressure treated "PT" lumber is made for damp areas, where there's moisture and direct contact to concrete or earth. Make sure to use the proper coated anchors for Pressure treated lumber. such as hot-dipped galvanized or stainless steel fasteners. there's more detail about this below.. keep in mind pressure treated is not only a preservative it is also a ...


9

No, I would not recommend nailing through carpet. Whether or not you prefer to, cutting the carpet and pad and removing them (under the wall) is the only right way to do this job. Baseboards on top of carpet will look like baseboards on top of carpet. If that's not how the rest of the baseboards are done, they will indeed look "off;" especially in the ...


9

In general, there is no problem in screwing drywall (or most other materials or light weight fixtures) into any framing members. This includes 2X studs, beams, steel studs or other variants on these. There are restrictions on notching and drilling large holes. Dimensional lumber is most forgiving of these modifications, but manufactured beams have ...


9

The rule is that the studs in any exterior or load-bearing wall may be notched, but no deeper than 25% of the width of the stud, or a hole no bigger than 40% of the width of the stud may be bored in it (you could pass the conduit or cable through the stud). There's an exception that you can notch 60% of the depth if the stud is doubled and no more than two ...


9

Can't say for sure why they did it in your situation, without knowing a bit more details. Typically blocking is installed to prevent framing members from twisting or warping, and to stiffen and add strength to the wall. Though it's also common to install blocking, where fire stops are required by code. Blocking can also provide an attachment point for ...


9

Aside from electrical and plumbing interference, you can do pretty much whatever you want with the framing. That wall is mostly decorative (it saved some money by not requiring the cabinet makers to finish the backs of the cabinets). If you have smooth walls, open the drywall enough to work. Frame in your opening, replace the drywall, add corner bead or ...


9

One of the people who worked on building our new house also works with several groups of people in recovery and twelve step programs. In some of these programs, people live in a halfway house or something similar and often really need spending money, even for things like a toothbrush or even just snacks. We have a large lot with a lot of things that need ...


9

The framing looks fine. It's a drop ceiling to hide the duct work; just don't hang any love swings off of it. None of it is structural so whatever. And rehab is never pretty, especially having to put drywall runners behind a finished surface that you're trying to maintain. I want to see how they're going to match that texture and blend in the patch. That's ...


9

If there is nothing wrong with the pre-existing drywall there is no way I could justify removing it. The ceiling joists look like 2x4's turned on their side? I've never seen anything less than 2x6 upright on the ceiling of a house with drywall. I'm also not sure if my eyes are processing the picture correctly. If it's what I think it is, I would nail/...


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