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6

Since that wall runs parallel to the joists above it is not a load bearing wall. That said, I always recommend that anytime you are going to remove any wall that could be a supporting wall that you hire a structural engineer to get his OK on your project. Removing any load bearing wall without the proper support could be a disaster waiting to happen. My 2 ...


6

Simply surface mount the panel, then it doesn't matter what the stud spacing is behind it. You'll put a piece of plywood on the surface of the wall, screw it into the studs, then screw the panel to the plywood, and Bob's your uncle! Once you've got the surface mounted panel, you can then run a chase from floor to ceiling (thanks for the reminder, George!), ...


5

You have several challenges when adding many thousands of lbs. of weight to a roof system like that (which almost certainly wasn't designed with that use in mind): The ceiling joists aren't up to the task, as you know. The only real fix for this over a 24' span is to tie them to the rafters, which leads us to the next problem... The rafters are barely ...


5

If you can drill straight through to run longer chunks (or if not able to, a bunch of shorter chunks, and couplers, and perhaps slightly oversized holes in some studs to facilitate getting them in) you can just run the conduit in a straight line at the elevation you want the boxes at, and run straight into the sides of the boxes, rather than using a bunch of ...


4

Would a truss connector plate be what you are looking for? This joint is quite common in a truss.


2

What are these brackets? Those are galvanized steel brackets attached with timber screw fasteners. As neither of these products were manufactured in 1902, it is safe to say that someone in the recent past added them to reinforce the structure.


2

If the framing is exposed, move it over to get your opening you need. If you can, and your floor framing above is at 16" on center, move the stud that will put it closer to the joist above, not farther away.


2

I did something similar to replace a chimney that was damaged in an earthquake and had to be replaced. Instead of building a new chimney I replace the old removed flue with 10 inch inside diameter stainless steel triple wall insulated stack piping inside of a tall chase. I built the chase much larger than your proposed 12"x12" size. My chase was, ...


2

The best way to add stiffness to prevent skewing is to add diagonal bracing, or completely sheath one side with plywood or OSB. Then the butt joints can just be held together with toenailed nails. Without knowing what this is for, I realize it may not be workable.


1

Just imagining the logistics of it, I wouldn't want to build a soffit above already installed cabinets, especially if there are mechanicals up there already. Not to mention, trying to protect the cabinets while you drywall, mud, sand, and paint everything would be a nightmare. Unless you have some really compelling reason why you can't, why wouldn't you do ...


1

With 3/4" material screwed to it it will be crazy strong. stronger than those engineered beams that only have 1/4" material for the web. Talk to the flue installer to see if they want it fully enclosed or only 3 sides enclosed for the install.


1

You could tonail some screws at an angle through the joint. You could use a bunch of corner braces. You could also use nail plates across both sides of all the joints. 6" screws all the way through s not a bad way to go also. Each approach has tradeoffs between strength, ease of installation, and appearance. You could use a combination of methods too.


1

It took me a while to figure our the drawing of the first floor are first floor and ceiling, not first floor and floor joists. (Is the first floor is a concrete slab?) There's a 6x12 beam (triple 2x12) in the first floor ceiling supported at one end by the alcove wall. Superimposing the top floor over the lower floor shows that above the wall with the alcove ...


1

This would be easier to answer if you told us what this is for. The left-to-right skew is known as "racking". To prevent racking, the best practice for this is not using (solely) 90-degree joints. Replace the middle stud with two diagonal studs. For fasteners, either toe-nail into the horizontal 2x4s, or pocket screws, or truss plates. Also-- ...


1

Use the mortice and tenon joints - one way to get the structural rigidity and avoid unsightly brackets sitting above the surface. The link shows some versions possible.


1

I'd check what is directly above that double stud before removing the wall. While the wall itself may not be bearing a load, there may be a column or some other point load directly above the studs. As suggested by other users a structural engineer could be the best $300 you ever spent.


1

Framing isn't the issue, airflow is. If you plan on enclosing both the hot water heater and furnace, use open slotted panels on a bifold door to allow air flow. If you have a fresh air return (from outside) for the furnace, this must be directed into the room of the furnace with sufficient space for air to flow into the the furnace, usually the face or a ...


1

As per answer above , the overhang is very minimal and if done to keep framing square then yes it is fine ,,,In fact it is very common as it is people building these things not precision machinery ( someone could have tripped or concrete pump hose could have hit forms when pouring ) Regardless in all building codes there is a min bearing amount which in ...


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