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5

Cut a 2x4 to length and rip 1-1/4" off each side. Put those up against the top plate, one inside and one outside. The half inch hollow in between is inconsequential. End view _____ |_____| <-- top wall plate |_| |_| <-- 1-1/4" high rippers


4

If you didn’t order your lumber by “grade”, then you don’t have much to complain about. If you ordered 27-2x4’s and you got 27-2x4’s, then they fulfilled the order correctly. The lowest “grade” of lumber is “Economy”. (It’s even lower than “Utility”.) It allows twisted material, deformed material, etc., just about everything you described that was in ...


4

That is some sub-quality lumber and I'd be very upset as well. It's almost like they dumped their reject pile on you knowing that you might not bulk due to the large delivery fees involved and the trouble you would have to personally return it. They need to either replace it or accept a return including the delivery fee. I don't know that you really need ...


4

You should be able to stack two furring strips on each side of the top plate. The one I'm looking at right now is 5/8" thick, stacked would be 1.25".


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There aren't many options for framing cheaper than basic 2x4 lumber. You could go down to 2x3 which is sometimes cheaper but you'll find that interior doors and insulation are generally sized for 2x4 walls with 1/2" drywall. You could also consider metal studs. These are available down to 1.5 inches in thickness (fine if all you want to do is hide the ...


3

Gaps around windows are common (there's a reason why they're called "rough-in"). As long as the gaps aren't larger than the trim, you're fine. Oddly enough, the old trim looks like it was attached to the window. That would explain the gap (it wasn't visible from the inside). The unusual thing here is the size. Expanding foam is your friend here, but be sure ...


3

In my opinion you're well within your rights to call and speak to whoever arranged your order or his manager about the quality of the lumber you received. Yes, it does seem that homeowners get the short-end of deal vs. larger customers like builders and contractors. I'd call and ask them to take back the crappy stuff and replace it with stuff suitable for ...


2

Wood isn't pressure-treated just because it may touch the ground. It's a sponge, and it'll always be damp inside unless you're in a desert. Whether you need it is your prerogative, but why would you pay a premium for redwood pickets and not use something of roughly equal longevity to support them? Brand recommendations are off-topic here. I've removed that ...


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Standard 8d nails are 2.5" long. Anything else is going to be some sort of special purpose nail such as these: 8d 1.5" nails


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Build a filler shelf or projection. Nicely done it can be storage for bath gel etc Or you can use it for candles for added ambience... And had to do a shelf like that for an 8" gap due to the size of the bathroom and the cast iron bath that needed to be retro-fitted. Some nice stained wood and tight edges with sealer and it is not a problem. Also had a ...


1

When I built my deck I used a the same joist hanger as the rest of the joists but moved it and the joist inward the thickness of the joist. Then nailed/screwed an additional joist to its face to even it up to the edge of the ledger. This worked well because it gave me twice the thickness to secure the planks and kept the nails/screws away from the edge. The ...


1

You aren't clear on how the posts are anchored. Are you pouring concrete piers or doing metal mounting plates with concrete anchors? Either way, I think your plan is sound but you should also anchor the center posts which are floating in your current plan. That will add considerably more structural integrity to your fencing. I like the 6x6 posts for strength ...


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I would sketch out your plan to scale with dimensions and provide that drawing to your building department for your permit. I have done exactly what you are doing 3 times. Is your garage going to be totally enclosed? If it is the wall needs to be fire rated , this is not that hard removing the siding 2 sheets of Sheetrock with the seams staggered is what it ...


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1) Is having a 3" overhang at the edge and corner for that 2.5' (which will be under the new shower and up to about where the adjacent toilet sits, but not behind the toilet) be a problem, especially since I'm going to be laying tile over it? For tile, probably since any movement could crack the tile or grout 2) If #1 is a problem (I suspect it is), is ...


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The “RTD” in RTD plywood stands for Resistance Temperature Detector. You have your normal CDX plywood for exterior sheathing. This plywood is made to function better outdoors - deals with temp changes and moisture better than other forms of plywood. The main difference between this and your normal plywood is that you will have less delamination. Now ...


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