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7

Yes, you can. It will not affect it structurally, given you are only drilling relatively small (3/4” or so) holes. You won’t want to drill a large plumbing line through it.


2

That appears to be a joist sitting on top of a double plate. You then have some OSB, and another 2x4 being the bottom of your next set of walls. Behind that joist is probably nothing. However it could be a stack- but I'd guess even if there are two there's still going to be a gap of about 1/2" to 3/4" in the center of it, straight through. You can drill ...


2

No, it's not. You'll weaken the rafters. Edge cuts are particularly harmful to structural members. If anything, you would rip a whole bunch of shims, (say, 7/8" thick), and lay them across the tops of the rafters, omitting them where the wires are. Or sister the rafters. However, this would create a second code violation: wires too close to the ...


2

I think your on the right track to start by shimming under the joists along the top of the cinder-block wall. The target height for the middle of the joists is the most common high-level of the joist-ends. Then lay shims on top of the low joist-ends to bring them up to the target height. I've ripped unusable (warped) 2x4s and thin sheet materials into long ...


2

A notch in the end of a beam does not affect the strength (or deflection) of a beam, unless it’s more than 1/4 th the height of the beam (or joist) at the ends out to the face of the bearing point. (See Code ICC R502.8.1) Code does not allow notches in middle 1/3 span and Code allows 1/6 th depth of beam in the last 1/3 rd span at each end of beam. In ...


1

There are several factors in designing floor systems Normal Loading consists of Live Loads (people, furniture, etc.) and Dead Loads (carpet, subfloor, insulation, ceiling finish below, etc.) The Code requires a minimum of 40 psf Live Load and 10 psf Dead Load. Check to see if your construction exceeds this minimum. You can google how much plywood weighs ...


1

The joists will be more springy than with a shorter span. It will carry the load that they are designed for. If you want to reduce the springiness, set the joists at 12" centers instead of 16" and add 2 rows of bridging instead of one through the center. This of course will cost more and carry a much heavier load but will reduce deflection.


1

Some people are lucky. I suspect you’re one of those... You say it’s a 2x6 bottom chord of truss that extends across your house. If so, the member is in tension and a small notch will not matter, provided: 1) the span is not greater than 50’ or 40’ in a heavy snow zone, AND 2) you do not overload the new space. 1) Bottom chords of trusses are in tension ...


1

The weak-link in a shear wall is not the nailing of corners together. Rather, the shear walls tend to “un-zip” from the foundation. As you can imagine, the force from wind is NOT evenly distributed along a shear wall. Rather, the force to rotate the wall is greatest near the end of the shear wall closest to the wind load. (It’s different in seismically ...


1

If the hole is dead center it is the center of a 2x4 framing post ( which are acttualy 1 and 1/2 inches wide) so the center is at 3/4ths of an inch.You can place the hole over the marks made every 16 inches as an example for frame posts and then mark both sides along rhe width of the tongue because it is the same width of a 2x4


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