71

What about trimming the roller shade? Most shades are meant to be trimmed, since manufacturers can't make every single size. See if you can pop off one of the ends, and then cut the rolled-up shade with a utility knife or something similar.


64

Swap their positions. Place the bookcases so that they lean into each other instead of away from each other. This will eliminate the gap between the tops. Bookcase contents are usually quite heavy. Once the cases are filled, you will probably find that you can force the bottoms together and the weight of the contents will distort the shape of the cases ...


50

Use Screws Anyway If it was me, I would quietly ignore "I am not allowed to secure it using screws in the wall." We are talking about a couple of screws here, which would leave ~ 1/4" holes, not cutting out large sections of the wall. Assuming it is drywall or plaster over studs, as opposed to a brick wall, I would put in two screws (~ 2" ...


47

Welcome to the joys of working with a natural product! Before I address your construction techniques, I've got to say that is a quite handsome looking door you've made. Well done! Wood moves. It expands and contracts as temperature and humidity change. It's a "feature" of wood that you cannot and will not be able to change. It's so critical, common and ...


38

Thanks everyone; I figured it out and came back here to update my post and noticed that Michael Karas said the same thing I realized (although it was a comment, so I couldn't mark it as the correct answer): I had to pop the back off the left unit (which was actually quite easy because it was just 1/4" plywood attached with brads and no glue), re-rack the ...


35

You don't have to buy or get a framing square : just measure the diagonals... That will tell you if either or both units are out of square. If they are both ok, then look to the floor - small change in the floor will make a large gap at the top... Then you need some adjustable feet of some sort.


31

Wood glue, hands down. Wood glue is designed to penetrate the wood for a tighter bond. Properly done, wood glue is stronger than the surrounding wood. I have chairs I've wood glued and clamped and they're still fine years later. Epoxy is OK, but you have to make sure you get the right epoxy too. Many are exothermic (they get hot) and might eat your wood. ...


29

The Easy Way Fortunately, you're holding up a model train, not an actual train, so you can take some liberties. The hard part is following the rounded, off-square corners; the easy way to work around that is to literally cut corners. Rather than attempt to follow the rounded corners, just install four shelves as long as the straight parts of each wall, ...


27

Do not wear gloves while using a bandsaw (or any powered saw, drill press, or planer for that matter). The gloves will give you a false sense of security and do very little to protect your hands. In fact, they may end up getting your fingers pulled into the blade if the material catches. Which would you prefer: a cut fingertip, or a mangled hand? The best ...


24

It's important to remember the difference between a bolt and a screw (this is handy if you don't know the size of the bolt or screw) Screws have the threads doing the work of holding. Your hole should be the size of the screw shaft. In other words, hold a drill bit above the screw. You should still see the threads, but not the shaft. Bolts have a nut doing ...


23

Trimming the roller shade is obviously the right answer, but just in case somebody has a similar problem where it isn't the right answer: Don't try and create a router cut 3½" deep and ¼" wide - create one 3½" wide and ¼" deep. No router will have a problem with that. Probably easiest to clamp a piece of scrap to the outside of the beam, and then just cut ...


21

You don't. You transfer cut marks. You don't need to make a paper plan of your cuts. Just lay the shelves on each wall. Don't attempt to span a whole wall with 1 shelf board, it should always be 2 boards for ease of handling. If the wall angle is less than 90 degrees, initially cut each shelf at 80 degrees so its back can go all the way into the corner....


20

Don't. Use a coping saw with a very low profile or spiral blade. Woodworking small enough pieces to worry about your fingers means it'd be just as easy with a hand saw. Doresoom's edit about routing is most likely how they are factory produced.


20

"Structural" applies to load-bearing walls and the like. I think you're safe. From what i can tell in the picture, unless you're storing engine blocks on them, you should be fine.


19

I haven't built anything into a recess like you describe so this is conjecture. If you're fitting it into a recess and it is encased on all 5 sides (ceiling, floor, left side, right side, back wall), you could get away with not anchoring it. Since when it tips, it would strike against the ceiling. I'd also put wedges on all sides because it's probably not a ...


19

When you buy a hex bolt, the size on the label is the diameter of the shank below the head. The outside diameter (aka major diameter) of the threads will be no larger than this diameter. So for a 3/8" bolt, it's simple - you drill a 3/8" hole.


18

A hole saw. Nice and round, complete with a center hole.


18

Bad idea...explained later. But yes, as long as you keep the blade guard on & of course it will "work". Though, it's quite wild compared to a Circular Saw or a smaller Trim Saw. However, "safely" is a bad gamble. You're talking about multiples of higher RPM's & both accuracy & control will then be largely out the window compared to proper ...


17

Create a jig to hold the pieces in position for the various cuts. The jig will allow to maintain a safe distance from the blade and if designed well will give you a secure grip on the piece being cut. Also try to design your cuts for mass production. For example cut the gap between the legs and around the heads while all the pieces are still one long piece ...


16

It has to do with how far back the blade goes on the down (non cutting) stroke. It's usually called the "Pendulum Stroke adjustment." The idea being that it will move the blade back, out of the way of the material on the down stroke. It reduces the load on the saw when cutting thick materials, at the cost of a bit more splintering. Use a setting of 0 ...


16

Use a router with a pattern bit or a pattern collar and a end-cutting (plunge) bit. Create a circular template route out the interior. You can adjust the depth very accurately and bottom of the depression should be pretty smooth.


16

It is impossible for the bookshelf to rotate forwards and crush anyone, child or not, the way you have drawn it. For it to fall on someone (who pulled on it, or climbed it) it would have to rotate around point A on this diagram: As you can see, before it becomes dangerously tilted the back will hit the enclosure at the top and stop it tilting further. In ...


16

How do I rectify this? This is my first project. That's an easy, inexpensive and useful first project. Even if the work is square and accurately cut, it's easy to be off by a couple millimeters. And even if you're not, it's easy for the floor to be off a couple millimeters; tile is not perfect. Your best bet is to do a web search for furniture leveling ...


16

In addition to the accepted answer, it would help to add some weather protection. A small rain shield or canopy will help divert weather from the upper part of the door. Essentially a small verandah to divert both rain and sun from the door without impeding access, and gives you shelter when opening the door in the weather. Awning, canopy, door shelter, ...


16

Whenever I want an arc that accurate I use my 3hp router (a smaller rated router will do too, just for smaller scale work) screwed to a shop made pivot (trammel) and make repeated passes, next pass deeper than the last to complete the cut. A circular saw may make that tight of a curve if you set the saw shallow enough to just cut through the material. It ...


15

It depends on what you're cutting, why you're cutting it, and what type of cuts you're making. Long Straight Cuts When it comes to long straight cuts, a table saw is the best in the business. Set the fence, turn it on, and it'll cut the same width pieces forever. With a band saw (or most other saws), you'll be looking at using some type of jig for long ...


14

I'd make a template in the shape of a square donut out of 1/2" plywood by using a table saw to cut out the square hole in the 1/2" plywood. For example, if ... i) the recess in the desktop needs to be 8"x12" ii) the diameter of the base of the router is 6" iii) the diameter of the router bit is 1/2" ... then I'd ... 1) start with a rectangular piece ...


14

That is a set of punches. There are pin punches (the straight flat tipped ones), for popping out roll pins and the like. Center punches (the pointy ones) for marking a point in metal where to start a drill and to keep the drill bit from wandering. Looks like two nail sets (the tapered flat pointed ones) for setting nails below the surface in wood. And ...


14

I had the exact same problem and rather than removing the wood from under the counter, I totally removed the feet from the bottom of the washer and that gave me an extra 5/8". I put some thin furniture felt pads on the corners of the washer and it slid right into the space. If that doesn't float your boat, the Dremel with a routing bit will be accurate ...


13

I don't have direct experience but generally speaking while a circular saw blade can go through nails, it's dangerous as it increases the risk of a kick back. Although slower, you will be far safer if you cut the counter using a reciprocating saw with a demolition or dual wood/metal blade attached. That will cut through nails without the kickback potential....


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