66

I have had great success using a 4x8 foot sheet of white foam board. It is extremely light weight. I hung it from ceiling on strings attached to three binder clips or bull dog clips like show below. When not in use find a place you can store it flat. If it gets broken it’s cheap to replace. If it falls on a child no one gets hurt. The white foam is a good ...


35

TLDR: Don't use dodgy or bad paint, it will cost you way too much in your time to fix the result. The foul-smelling water is part of the paint, and you just wrecked the paint. It is foul-smelling because it contains things other than water, which perform a necessary function to curing the paint. It won't work without it. It is normal for paint components ...


35

Use painters tape (blue tape, Frog tape, lots of different names and brands) to mask off the areas you don't want to paint green. First, paint your ceiling and 3 walls white (2 or 3 coats, however many are needed) and wait for the paint to dry. Then, apply the painters tape to those walls and ceiling as close to the 4th wall as possible. Next, and this is ...


35

Make a stencil. That what road markers typically use for arrows, symbols, letters and numbers . Easiest would be out of some cardboard boxes. Flatten the boxes, cut them and create a stencil with a gap shaped like the stripe. Place on the road, spray paint, then re-position for the next stripe. Illustration from Asphalt Line Stripping:


28

These are consumables You wouldn't worry about reusing a rubber glove or a paper towel. If it's pristine, sure... But generally you don't expect to. That roller cover is $3, the hot dog is $1 and the brush is $2. Stannius makes a good point about buying a quality brush and taking care of it. That idea actually harkens back to the age when ...


25

Nononono! Tell him to save his latex paint! I sometimes paint things at industrial sites. Latex works fine on the buildings, but when it is used on steelwork of any kind, it turns into an unmitigated disaster, that you pay for for decades. This is a metal thing left outdoors. It will have much higher extremes of temperature than a house's walls. It ...


24

Don't stretch your paint. The problem is probably not pressure (assuming that you remain consistent), but what I call "stretch". Folks tend to stretch the paint load of their roller or brush too far. With experience you'll learn what's the appropriate coverage area for a loaded roller. The goal, of course, is to end up with a uniform film of paint on the ...


23

Besides the line-spray machine mentioned in the comments, perhaps you might try using a narrow roller instead of spray. For the purposes of parking-lot lines, that should give a sharp-enough boundary. I'd recommend putting down a snap-line or equivalent in any case, and following that carefully. I know you can buy rollers down to 4 inches; of course it's ...


18

Usually the second coat doesn't need tape because you don't need to get as close to the edge. But if you are going to, you'd want to re-mask for each coat. Otherwise the paint can seep under the masking tape while it's drying or it will pull non-masked paint off when you remove it.


18

It would be quick and easy to mask the shoe. Slide a roll of high-quality painter's tape along the baseboard, tight to it, while pressing the dispensed tape against the shoe. Run a finger wrapped in a thin towel along to press it tight. Pull the tape shortly after painting and scrape off any bleed with a soft (plastic or wood) tool while the paint is still ...


18

In my experience, tape just doesn't do that well. Even if you get a clean line, you're at the mercy of the tape's shape, and it's following the texture. It often ends up looking artificially sharp and jaggy. Instead, use what I call the twitch technique, which is a variation of the standard cut-in. Load your brush on one side, just an inch deep or so. ...


18

It sounds like you need a Line Striping Machine. If you search your favorite search engine, you can find one of these fairly easily. While there are higher end models with special paint reservoirs and compressors and all that jazz, there are also simpler ones that simply mount a can of spray paint like you have and hold it a constant distance from the ...


16

No two whites are the same. In fact, sometimes two tins of the same color from the same company can be different! This is why if you are painting large areas, it is best to blend the cans together.


15

These are stains caused by resin from knots. To cure this problem you will have to strip the paint from the knot and surrounding area and then paint the area of the knot with knotting solution this will seal the end grain of the knot and prevent subsequent staining. Reprime the stripped areas of wood and then repaint the whole piece.


15

Painting hinges is not a question of being better or worse. Depending on the motif, hinge finishes are often selected to complement the door or trim color. For example: brass metal finish often used with tan trim/doors or natural wood finishes. Chrome or brushed nickel hardware is popular with white trim/doors. Hinges and passage sets come in a lot of ...


14

Yes, you should prime the whole surface. Sealing/priming helps prevent penetration of vapors and moisture from the air into the drywall. If you don't seal the entire surface, even though it's behind cabinets, penetration can happen - mind you it's not going to be significant but it can happen. Plus the time involved to paint behind those cabinets that ...


14

I never tape anything and people are amazed at the crisp lines I paint in my home. I use a high quality angled brush for this. Depending on my wrist fatigue and room, I work from either left to right, or vice versa with this technique. This is self-taught and I have no idea if their is a name for this. I load the brush up with plenty of paint and then ...


14

When we re-striped my in-laws' parking lot, we used a combination of two things. We used a striping wand (example) to hold the spray can at a consistent position and angle while moving. To keep the lines straight, we used some scrap lumber to built a guide shaped like a capital letter 'T' (IIRC, we used an old wall stud). Place the flat part of the 'T' ...


14

Cut a sheet of wood into the dimensions of your window. Screw in L brackets in the four corners of the wall where you want to put the wood. Then just like a picture frame you install four rotating pegs to hold the board in place while you watch the movie. Depending on your budget, you could also install magnets on the back of your board to hold it in place ...


13

Probably yes. And probably an oil based primer unless the can says otherwise. On top of that a concrete primer if they exist. If you don't prime then you run the risk of the paint peeling, especially since garage floors are so smooth. Plus you might run through way more paint than you think and need to get more since concrete is so porous, it will soak ...


13

For small holes like you describe, I'd use Light Weight Spackle rather than standard vinyl Spackle. The Light Weight Spackle is very easy to apply, will almost disappear in small pin holes, and you can smooth it off with a damp cloth apx 15 minutes after application. using a damp cloth also removes excess Spackle from surrounding paint so the only patch ...


13

Any home improvement centre sells two essential things for this: painter's tape and plastic sheeting. Buy a thin plastic for the walls, and thicker one for the floor (or, better yet, use drop cloth for the floor). Buy wide painter's tape, it's much easier to use it to attach plastic sheets to walls, shower doors, etc. Tape and cover everything. There will ...


12

Your crack is forming over and over because the steam pipe is getting hot, expanding, and cracking your plaster. The solution is to cut the plaster back about 1/4" from the walls of the pipe all the way around, then to cover the seam with an escutcheon that hides the crack. Example of a smaller escutcheon:


12

My dad and his dad were both professional union painters. They taught me that for small spots of spackle on the wall, all you have to do is put a quick layer of regular paint over them with a brush while you're doing your cutting-in brushwork. The spot over the spackle will be mostly dry when you go back over it with the roller later. I know from personal ...


12

You should be working the paint out to the point that it doesn't run. (People paint walls every day without this problem.) Or buy better paint. (Cheap paint is very watery.) You may also be applying too heavily. Put the paint on the surface and brush or roll it outward to distribute. You should have an even coat that's as thin as it can be without showing ...


12

Rattle cans are not really the right way to do that job. I am appalled that the things big-box stores will sell you with a straight face, they stock many things that are wrong, require specialty skills or are downright illegal, and all the burden on you is to know the craft and know what to buy, and then their $8/hour clerks advise you wrong (because they ...


12

A primer is recommended for joint compound. Using a primer seals the mud and actually uses less paint with a even finish in the long run.


11

You will need to take off all the glue if you want a good finish. The paint will lift the glue, but unevenly, and mix with the paint. This will cause the paint to clump and not cover properly and all in all it will look terrible. I know because I did this in the first house I owned and had to wash the walls of the one room where I tried this several times ...


11

You can get a mixer tool that attaches to a power drill. This does a much better and faster job than the wooden paint stirring sticks you can pick up at any paint store.


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