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7

There are 3 options: 1) Solid Color Concrete Stain: Just like solid body stain for wood, this is provides a uniform color and should cover the two different color stains you have. However, many feel it looks too uniform. In fact, most complain that it looks "plastic". Stamped concrete should look like natural stone rather than painted stone. (A good solid ...


4

There is a good possibility that the pine boards in a 130 year old house are very dense wood. Old growth timber from that time was quite different from what we experience as "pine" today. As such that type of wood is much less absorbent than even some types of hardwood that you may choose today. The dense wood leaves more of the stain material on the surface ...


4

Leave it exposed to the elements. You're not doing it any favors by sealing it with plastic. In fact, you'll run the risk of staining it by trapping moisture and/or fostering mildew and other grossness. It's better to let it dry out gradually over the winter and have it seasoned and ready for sealing in the spring. It may fade or gray out slightly, but the ...


4

I use a shellac based primer for things such as this. It has better hiding ability then just paint or regular primer. Give it two or more coats and see if it hides the problem and then you can apply the final paint. If you still see a shadow after the shellac primer you could try a coat of bonding primer over the shellac primer.


4

To me that looks like a water leak that is being pushed by the air flow. I would be checking for a leak above that location.


3

Stain never "dries" the way a lacquer or poly finish does. It will cease to be "wet" after awhile, but it will still just come off on your hands and clothing etc. Not a good idea to just leave it on there. Ultimately it is only darker if more of it soaks in. Reapplication after wiping will darken it only slightly, as most of the wood pores are already ...


3

Ammonia is not the right chemical anyway. Try vinegar; if that's too much of a chemical for you, get out a razor blade and start scraping. Or rinse after using it.... Once you have it clean, use a squeegee to remove any water from it before it dries after each use to keep it clean.


3

Cedar does not need to be stained, if you don't mind it weathering to gray; that's part of the point of using cedar. Or you can stain it after it has dried out a bit. No rush.


3

There are products sold for your specific issue. Check your local hardware store or home improvement center for CLR (Calcium-Lime-Rust) cleaner. CLR is a specific brand name but there are many formulations of similar products available.


3

Most likely, if you are certain it is NOT from moisture it can be the simple fact that it is some inexpensive painters caulk that was never painted. In a commercial settings ie. eateries, we use clear silicone. You could simply try painting it.


3

As Kris said in a comment, the solution is to not let that much moisture accumulate. Run a well-performing bath fan every time you use the shower, even in the dead of winter. Vary run duration accordingly. In my part of the world this means 2-4 hours in summer and at least a quarter of an hour (after the shower ends) in winter. As I often say, your ...


3

It's a water stain, either from a leak as Ed stated or condensation. Check the ductwork for leaks. Once you have fixed the problem, brush on two coats of stain blocker, prime and then paint. Whether you have to paint the entire ceiling will depend on how well you can match the paint.


2

This really depends on the exact cause of your water issues. When I buy a house with a lot of build up on the glass I try the following steps in pretty much this order: Hot vinegar on paper towels. Stick paper towels on door. Note that when using vinegar you can ruin nearby towels/clothing. Hot vinegar/Dawn/baking soda paste. Rub it on door, let sit for ...


2

~20 years landlord experience, we learned to stop painting all the trim white and use poly. It looks nicer/more expensive and does not definitely need attention every time it's up for rent. Paint gets dirty, urethane just looks properly aged. Whatever it is, if it's made out of lumber, stain and urethane it.


2

I'd go to the manufacturer of the wood glue you want to use before you get too far along. Titebond is popular and I've had great luck with it, in their FAQ they have specific instructions for gluing up cedar, before you finish it, due to the oil in cedar. I think most of them are pretty oil resistant once they cure, especially polyurethane, which is ...


2

To me, it doesn't look like it's coming from above. It looks like something splashed on the ceiling, or condensation formed on the ceiling. If this is a bathroom or kitchen, try running the exhaust fan during showers and while cooking. The only way to be sure it's not coming from above, is to get up in the attic and have a look around.


2

"Is it paint or stain?"- neither, that fence is made of plastic. It is manufactured that color. "Can cedar be prepared to look like it?" - the grain uniformity and absence of knots and defects is unrealistic, natural cedar will have natural imperfections. If you choose your lumber carefully you can select pieces that look nicest to you. A high quality semi-...


2

You're a metal worker? How about stainless? This DiY Headstone suggests high strength mortar mix. You should use colorant to achieve your final color instead of attempting to stain it afterwards, which would only be skin deep. However, this is why you use granite: I'd suggest Uba Tuba for its flakes: Truly though, what I'd recommend, is having a real ...


2

Urethane is a sealer and durability layer. It keeps cleaning equipment and shoes from scuffing through the surface of the stained wood and degrading appearance. It also prevents liquids from soaking in and staining. Whether you do it is up to you, but I've never seen un-sealed wood installed as base trim.


2

I painted my deck last year with Behr stain, water based, but looked like paint because I wanted color. Later I noticed that some of the boards seemed like they didn't get as much coverage. So the next day I simply added a second coat on the spots and the boards where I felt it was too thin. It still looks great over a year later and I never had to deal with ...


2

Short answer is that you can get them pretty close, but it's going to take some care while staining. Oak and walnut have similar grains, so with proper staining, they can look pretty similar. Assuming it's common red oak, your oak might have a slightly more reddish tint to it. White oak won't have that, but it's less common and generally more expensive. ...


2

Vinegar should be able to dissolve copper stains. Those stains are commonly copper hydroxocarbonate AKA copper carbonate hydroxide, which easily dissolves into copper acetate.


2

What you have planned to build will take a lot of sanding. If you have a random orbit sander and will be using a lot of solid stock, experiment with your stain samples. Let me say this first, if you sand everything out getting rid of the planer marks (washboarding) the quality of your finish will be remarkably better. Secondly, sanded wood takes stain ...


2

It depends. Let's back up for a second and talk about how stain/waterproofing works. Wood is a porous material. When dry, it will soak up liquids like a sponge. In fact, it's that soaking/drying cycle of water that will eventually wreck your wood (and why waterproofing helps extend the life of exterior wood). Deck stains generally rely on that principle. ...


2

A gloss paint would minimize this type of staining, but will do nothing for other issues humidity can cause (ie mold and rot). As others have said, ventilate! In the winter, simply leaving the bathroom door open is enough for my house (but then, I don't have kids, so the shower isn't running for more than an hour every day, and the bathroom is empty for long ...


2

Ventilation is key to preventing moisture from building up in a bathroom. Either the vent fan may not be running long enough, or it is moving an inadequate amount of air. The vent may be blocked, or the fan itself is not working properly, or does not move enough air (CFM) for the size of the room. If so, then the fan would need to be replaced. If it simply ...


1

Polyurethanes are fine since they're on all furniture & all the kids are plastic poisoned anyway, but the poly's don't last to long outdoors. I'm a huge fan of One Time Wood Protector & it's completely different, lasts much longer & just needs to be re-coated & not stripped or sanded at the end of it's life. But, it's UV cured so the Sun has ...


1

There's no reason to prime in between layers of plaster and patching compound. Just remove any peeling paint or loose plaster and patch with new joint compound. Once the new stuff dries fully, sand it smooth, clean, prime, and paint. A decent stain-blocking primer like Kilz will do fine with an old water stain, but if you have more insidious stains (e.g. oil,...


1

Another approach -- one a pro furniture repair tech might use for a flaw this size or smaller -- would be to use "burn in" lacquer, blended to match the color, to both tint the damaged area and fill it level with the undamaged area surrounding it. (I haven't done this; I've watched it being done and he swore it wasn't that hard a skill to learn if you ...


1

Polyurethane is basically liquid plastic. It forms a hard shell, which will protect the wood underneath. Since pine is considered to be a soft wood, the poly will add some impact resistance. The poly itself may chip, but the wood underneath will be better protected than regular latex paint. I wouldn't be too concerned about the durability difference between ...


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