New answers tagged

1

The type of wood is likely to vary depending on what country you're in. The only thing I'm prepared to say is that they don't look like firewood. Forget trying to bleach or wash them: the major effect you'll have is interfering with any subsequent treatment. Make sure they're adequately dry, sand lightly including the sides, and soak overnight in a staining ...


2

I don't think it is redwood or cedar. It looks like fir to me. Probably douglas fir. Clear. Whatever it is, it looks like good stuff, and I wouldn't do anything to it. It won't take long for the any new lumber you get to look like the existing lumber you have. Don't clean it. Don't seal it. Just nail it to some new rails and enjoy.


6

These are my best guess. Those look like the standard fence board from HD or Lowes, which are normally softwood with a redwood or cedar stain or them. They would not be treated with any preservative just stained. I see no purpose but a lot of work to "restore" with Chorox and washing with soap and water. You might do a quick clean up with a high ...


3

I think you're close, but I like to have my brackets extend at least 2/3 the depth of the desk. This is as much a matter of supporting the top as it is keeping the stresses on the wall attachment reasonable--the shorter the bracket is with respect to the desktop's depth, the exponentially greater the pullout force on the top fastener and the pressure on the ...


0

Another option is a fence-post mender from Simpson. I don't know if it will work in your case, but I've had success with using them on fence posts that have rotted out inside the concrete footer (their stated use case). In theory, you could bolt two ties on the bottom of your new 4x4, then drive the menders between the snapped off remains and the existing ...


1

You can get a steel 'repair spur' that is designed to be driven into and around the broken post. They are shorter than normal steel post spikes Alternately, you could fit a bolt down anchor over the hole (possibly filling the rest of the hole with concrete first)


0

Cut the top and bottom off of a 2-liter plastic bottle, forming a long cylinder. Slide this cylinder over the stump of the post. Apply wood glue to the surfaces of the post and then slide the remainder of post into the cylinder, matching the broken edges together. Then use a heat gun on the cylinder of plastic to shrink it tightly to the two halves of the ...


4

THIS ANSWER IS WRONG! I misread the question as the 4x4 having broken 6 inch ABOVE the ground... With 6'' (15cm) above the ground remaining (assuming that those 6 inch are solid and you already trimmed off any splintered bits), you should have enough left to use angle joints*. Cut off the bottom piece of wood in such a way that the most non-splintered wood ...


4

For what it's worth. You are only borrowing trouble if you don't remove the old post. The trick to removing a post is that you do not dig it out. You attach a jack to it and pull it out. Your challenge is that your post is broken off. Drill a pilot hole and them use a 6" lag bolt to secure a piece of chain to your stump. Attach the chain to your jack ...


1

It happened once, it will happen again. I'd start by getting as much of the old post out as possible. Perhaps a hole saw on the end of a longer shank would chew out the center. Another option is a larger forstener bit to munch the remains of the post. (Updated - not recommended) If you're competent with a chainsaw it may be possible to plunge-cut downward ...


10

This might be overkill, but it does solve the "no re-pour" requirement Get some concrete and a single post tie designed to be put into concrete (i.e. for decking). You can typically find these in the area with pressure treat 4x4s. Make sure you buy fasteners as well (deck screws and/or galvanized bolts) Pour concrete into the hole. Put your post-...


15

Ground screw. source Screw this down through the old wood post. The depicted ground screw is 27 inches but I am sure you can find others if that is too long. The screw will be anchored in the old wood all the way down and through into the concrete. The top of the ground screw will hold your new post.


9

I had the exact same problem. I got a 6 foot dig bar and just chopped the heck out of the 12 inches of wood remaining in the square hole and was able to remove all of the wood. I got a new 4x4, cut it to the proper length and rammed it into the existing concrete hole and then screwed the mailbox on to the top of the new post. I've done this with fence posts ...


10

If it broke off below grade, you can fill in the original hole and use a drive-in stake anchor for a new post in a new spot. As long as you have the ability to move left or right a foot or so, this should be viable. Note that you’ll still need to call to have buried utilities marked before driving in the new anchor.


1

Can you dry everything thoroughly and just glue the 4x4 back together? It's a mailbox, so it doesn't cary a large load. You'll need waterproof glue. Probably polyurethane. You'll need to clamp the pieces together while they dry. Would this help: https://www.homedepot.com/p/Simpson-Strong-Tie-E-Z-Base-Black-Powder-Coated-Post-Base-for-4x4-Nominal-Lumber-...


6

Blot with alcohol on a clean rag (repeatedly) to draw as much as possible out of the wood. Wash with trisodium phosphate. (commonly sold in paint stores for painting prep, since it's gone out of more general use due to water pollution issues with excess phosphates in wastewater streams.) Prime with a shellac-based primer to contain bleed-through.


1

If you wanted to use the "lift the legs through the table" option — which I'm not sure is most practical, although it would look quite stylish when the table was in use — then you would simply need a dowel/peg through the top of the leg at the level of the underside of the table, which the table-top rested on. Or, have a spring clip in the leg on ...


1

I recommend adding a gateleg drop leaf to each side of your kitchen island. Gatelegs are easy to construct and the only hardware you need is two simple hinges per leg. The best way to learn how to make a gateleg drop leaf is to go to a furniture store that sells them and examine the architecture. You can find instructional videos on youtube etc. but it's ...


1

Just a rough idea. You can fold the legs up if you wish. I would consider adding a wheel on the leg.


3

Locking Folding Brackets I have used method this successfully with a folding shelf in front of a microwave oven (due to door location, I had to build a cabinet smaller than the usual size and just large enough to hold the microwave oven with no workspace) and a computer "desk" that folds down against the wall. In each of these cases, the folding ...


0

My best trick.... laminate only one side of the map, and leave the other side paper. Paper glues very well to a wood piece with even elmers glue. So the back is well stuck to the wood (not a frame, but a flat piece) and the lamination protects the front. So if you have the resolve to make yet another "different copy", laminate it with a second ...


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