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I just did this, I bought these 4 round metal cylinders, that you buy screws for 8 MM And screw them to the table, after you use a clear glass top glue. I bought them On amazon, but the screws I bought at Home Depot 8 MM plu the glue. Love my table stump!!!


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These tables are created for “general” use by novice builders and designers. In fact, tables have safety factors calculated into them so there are no design accidents. Based on that assumption, if the table indicates the maximum allowable span is 71”, then I’d assume 72” is also acceptable. I see two issues that could significantly change the design loads…...


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I'm not a framing carpenter, but I have dealt with a similar situation. That 71 in / 72 in is actually a code threshold, and you have to stick to it. No point in arguing the impact of a measly extra inch. Windows are often 70in, so as to stay under that threshold. Nevertheless, I'd go with triple 2x10, resting on 2 jacks studs on either side, plus a king on ...


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That shape was likely achieved by using 2 molding knife profiles on a molding machine; buy your own. You need to either find the original manufacturer or a very advanced carpenter in your area that has such a machine. Your chances are probably slim to none. I agree with crip659's answer in the you should just wood glue it, clamp it down, sand, and paint. ...


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Can probably repair it with wood glue. Carefully open up crack, apply glue inside it, and then use weight or champs to press crack close. Should be good as new, or better. If able to get a syringe, can squeeze glue further into crack.


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Is there a safety reason for one or the other? A performance reason? Be sure to read any documents (instructions or user manual) that came with the doors (if they are a separate product) or stove (if the doors are built in to a product like a wood burner). Any safety instructions will be in those documents. As a manufacturer of glass for doors you should be ...


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Your paneling appears to be nominally 3/8", or about 5/16" actual. That's not sufficient to hold lag screws with confidence, in my opinion. Assuming that the paneling is well fastened to the framing, hollow wall anchors should do nicely. Your TV isn't crazy heavy and the mount keeps it close to the wall, so there isn't an extraordinary amount of ...


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That's a "check" from the green wood drying out, and the very likely fact that the center of the tree is in your post. It's structurally insignificant, utterly normal and expected, and you don't need to do anything about it. Trying to close it up will fail - it's a result of differential shrinkage (and is why wood you don't want to see such things ...


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Safety instructions are available from many government bodies, e.g http://www.safework.sa.gov.au/workplaces/plant-tools-and-vehicles/circular-saws Regret I cannot cut and paste part of the article, not correct to quote only part of the article.


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I would use galvanized carriage bolts. Easy to tighten up later as the lumber dries out and shrinks.


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In addition to the earlier options, you can use these GRK fasteners. They are rated/tested for torque and moment (listed on package and website), and do not require pre-drilling. They replace bolts of 1/4in (or so, check the specs). You can drive them through the 2x4 into the 4x4 from both sides. Available in a variety of lengths, at least 3in to 6in. Use at ...


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I would put cup head bolts all the way through with washers and nuts on the back. 1/4" is plenty fat enough. Four bolts per post.


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I would use stainless deck screws. Drill clearance holes all the way through the 2 X 4 , and put pilot holes in the 4 X 4. The SS deck screws can't take a lot of torque and heads will twist off without the holes. Or just galvanized lag screws ( around 1/4 by 4" ). I had SS deck screws on my mind as I have been using them to replace rusted deck screws in ...


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It appears like mold, I found a link that goes over some simple ways to test if something is mold. https://www.familyhandyman.com/list/how-to-test-for-mold/ I personally would check if the wood is soft, if the wood has an earthy smell... like the smell of dirt and decomposing leaves, both strongly indicate mold.


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This is a "tension tie" used both to tie joists to the house through the ledger, and to mount posts on the outside of the rim joists. There are different versions of these but most tie to an inside joist with nails or screws, then to the post (or bracket inside the wall) with a bolt. Example Simpson version: And here's one installed, seen from the ...


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Were the logs kiln dried before you started? Even if they were they'll still be almost as dry inside as when they were delivered. How much time did they spend in the rain at the factory and on the truck on their way to your place? Sure, they'll have picked up some moisture over the last couple of weeks, but the same will happen when it rains 10 years from ...


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I know this is quite an old question. However... I'd recommend drilling out the hole where the old screw went, gluing in a replacement dowel (use a waterproof glue or epoxy), then drive the screw into the replacement wood. For something like a railing, the stronger the better, and a screw will hold much better in wood than epoxy.


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If there is a header, this connector from the Simpson Strong-Tie could be what you need.


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The "golden rule" for deciding if you should use a nail or a screw is… "Bang a nail in & if the wood splits, you should have used a screw." To be less flippant, if you're unsure use a screw; if you're still unsure, drill a pilot first. Alternatively, on something of such little weight, glue it or use removable picture hanging stickies ...


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I would also encourage the use of small screws to attach the sawtooth hangers to the back of the name board. You can easily get small diameter screws that are 3/8" long from below the head to the end of the tip. Sawtooth brackets supplied with nails are going to have very small holes in the ends and so these will most probably need to be drilled out to ...


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I would be using small screws - easily available in lengths less than 1/2" but you are also helped by the bracket thickness. Also you should drill pilot holes for the screws - make sure you plan the positions so that you don’t coincide with any letters. Messing this up will affect the stability of your home life so measure carefully twice then cut once.


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First off, make sure there aren't nuts and washers on the other side of that wobbly leg that you could just tighten up. Drill a small hole in the filler/glue down to the screw and then cut away the rest with a utility knife. If you have a Dremel or other spin tool, use a bottoming bit and clean out the area. You might find that the screw holes were just worn ...


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This seems like an impossible question to answer based off of this one picture. If you can't afford to replace it and it's not in dangerous condition, then I don't see why fixing the problem areas wouldn't be your best temporary solution.


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