New answers tagged

2

Don’t use wood glue it will not normally adhere to the laminate. Rubber cement / contact adhesive is a good method. I have a spray that is great for this it is made for putting sandpaper on sanding disks. But it’s just rubber cement in a spray can. For Rubber cement contact adhesives to work they need to be applied and let dry until tacky then pressed ...


0

Unless you have a press. New door


0

I don't use any sandpaper or cardboard. After the first two coats have dried overnight I use a very sharp and honed 2" chisel of good quality to lightly shave the bumps and nibs off the surface. Holding the blade at a very low angle so as not to catch the wood. Then I tack the surface and one more coat usually does it. Note: The dust in the room must be ...


0

On condition you haven't yet bought the board, buy two boards, one the thickness of the lower part, the other to make up the total thickness. Then simply cut out, with a jigsaw, the top board. This doesn't directly answer your question, but solves your problem. To answer the question, a router will do the job - but it's messy and time consuming.


1

Lay out three of the boards side-by-side with a gap, e.g. 1/2", between them. With the outer boards for support use a router to make multiple passes down the center board until you have reached the desired thickness. (The gaps allow you to run of the edges off the center board without sacrificing the guide boards.) A bit of cleanup, e.g. with a random ...


24

If I had to do this, I'd just plane down the entire boards on a thickness planer, cut a 3/8" x 1" x 7' board and glue it back in the desired place. If you don't have a thickness planer, maybe a friend does or maybe a mill shop in your area would do it very inexpensively. A 18 ga nailer with 3/4 nails could be used to hold the 1x7 in place while ...


4

Circular saw table adjustment to the rescue. If you don't already have a router bit this is a good solution. Otherwise, a router would do fine. You'd need a straight bit without a roller tip. This technique is easy and relatively fast. It doesn't require removing safety equipment from your tools. Set your saw's table to the depth of the material to be ...


4

Looks like a type of Lacewing. Their larvae are predatory, mostly eating smaller insects like aphids and other insect larvae. If you are seeing the adults, it's likely that the larvae were pupating over the winter in a cozy spot between some boards. Although I have never heard of the larvae pupating in large groups, it could be that something about the ...


5

The use of distinct solid-wood edging strongly suggests veneer "Bookmatching" (mirrored grain) is not a guarantee of that, as it can be done in solid wood, but the close match of 5 pieces strongly suggests veneer. So it may just be veneered both sides. When solid wood is "multi-part bookmatched" the thickness of the wood (and change of ...


0

Your shed may have shifted. I have a larger shed that had this wood veneer nailed to the walls, and it's shifted somewhat, which warps the paneling. I would make sure your footings and walls are still level. If they aren't, you can use a car jack (use a car stand for a safety backstop) to raise the shed and add supports to raise it back to level.


3

If the bottom plate and studs were installed to finish the garage, only to support the drywall, then replacing the bottom plate would be fairly easy. You'd have to remove the drywall, remove the nails from the studs into the bottom plate and them hammer out the bottom plate. If there's any weight from the top plate, you might need a ceiling screw jack to ...


1

Typically, I find sanding is the most sure way to remove a staining mistake. To use a solvent or thinner will not remove enough of the wrong stain to make the difference you are looking for. When sanding by electric sander, it will leave marks that will not be apparent until, you stain. Those marks will also make the stain look slightly different than the ...


0

Particle board is often covered with a plastic laminate instead of paint, but there's nothing inherently wrong with painting it. You don't want to glop on massive quantities of paint, but there should be no issue in painting it. Use your favorite paint, so long as it's designed for wood, not plastics or metal. i.e., just about anything you'd get custom mixed ...


0

Unless you have unusual termites, the threat is wood in contact with soil. You need concrete (or a similar material that termites can't chew through) between the soil and the wood. You should also inspect the foundation every so often to check for termite tunnels. (Termites dry out easily, so they'll build a tunnel on the outside of the concrete in order to ...


2

In terms of sistering you don't need to treat the joist there if it has dried just sister the joists and attach the new subfloor to the new joists. Pressure treated wood for joists and subfloor is going about this wrong. If those get wet from above things have already gone awry. If you end up with another leak in the future you'll still need to pull up ...


2

Jump in and break the ice periodically. Minnesotan up! Seriously, walk the perimeter on a regular basis and bust the ice up with a shovel or other heavy tool. Unless the ice gets thicker than say a half inch across the entire surface it won't cause damage. Covering it will certainly help. You have a lot of heat in the ground, so if you insulate the top it'll ...


1

Floating a board in the water will help. wood absorbs more heat than water but the piece floating prevents a thicker sheet from forming and expanding. I am not sure how well a 2x4 will do but it will pick up heat and slow or prevent the surface from freezing solid or as thick, I haven’t had broken tiles since starting to do this many years ago.


2

Assuming you'll own the house for more than 10 years replace it. That door is subjected to weathering and a fiberglass door will hold up a lot better and require virtually no maintenance. It would be a lot of work to repair the damaged door.


3

If you'd rather not replace it and have some time to kill it is possible to re-surface the door. Door skins are thin veneer sheets meant for this purpose. The difficult part is ensuring the old doors exterior is flat and secure to the frame. Remove the knob and window frame. Patch and sand the old surface. Glue and nail and bowed/loose sections. Apply ...


1

I would replace the door. It appears to be separating. As it is an exterior door, its purpose is to make the entrance secure. The strength of the lock depends on the integrity of the door. It looks like you could pry out the window with a screwdriver. If the door frame is in good shape it may be possible to just replace the door.


2

Install some desk levelers on the legs similar to the ones shown below. (The picture is from Amazon and I have no business interest in them).


3

Yes, put some panels or diagonal bracing behind those end shelves. eg: bottom of left rear leg to top of left front leg, and the same on the right.


0

You can't even if you had better structure. The twisting of a direct hang bag is too much for beams and joists. I have put bags on metal I beams that were worked "loose" (have ran several gyms and boxed when younger). If you had a 10-20 pound soft bag and you were just tapping it... maybe. But any decent bag no way. We have trouble hanging ...


2

I would not. That's a very lightly-constructed roof by modern standards. Those "beams" are little more than stiffeners--the roofing boards are carrying most of the load over their much shorter span. By themselves the beams are not up to the task of spanning that distance with any integrity. In my judgement any load, even static, of 100 lbs. will ...


Top 50 recent answers are included