New answers tagged

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The installers use some very thin shingles of all things to level things out. Very good job, very pleased. Wood floor is flush to the adjacent tile and slope is unnoticeable if I did not point it out. Great feedback from the community. Thank you


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If you are going to be doing woodworking on a regular basis then you may find a good woodworkers bench a valuable and important "tool" to have. (Photo from Finewoodworking.com) A solid heavy workbench provides a stable surface to work on and the ability to hold down or onto the piece you are working on. There are different styles of bench's but ...


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Use 2 of any random wood clamp, to clamp the piece to the bench. As you move down the piece, you'll need to relocate the clamps.


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If you are talking about smoothing cross cuts on a board, you are going to want to use a Shooting Board. If you are planing the board along the long edge, or on the surface, you will need a solid workbench with a stop at one end. Nothing fancy, keep it simple. The height is adjustable so the plane doesn't hit the stop.


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The 50's called, they want their decor back....sorry, I couldn't help myself. Google: Adjustable Threaded Pole Leveling Foot


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(Migrating my answer from the closed duplicate question) The best way to do this is going to be shimming up one side and running the board through a planer. Basically you'll draw your angle on the endgrain, get a piece of MDF wider and longer than your work piece, then use framing shims to get your line parallel to the sheet of MDF. Tack/screw the shims in ...


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Just one detail: the horizontal force does not need to be tremendous and you can in fact adjust/limit it. The force the clothesline transmits to the post is in direction of the angle the clothesline has directly at the post, α. We can decompose it into a vertical component Fv that adds up (for both posts) to the gravitational force of the combined mass of ...


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the clothes-line with 6 inches of droop over 10 feet of span multiplies the weight of the clothes by about 20 to get the tension in the rope. The 4 feet tall 4 inch wide folding arm multiplies by another factor of twelve Your hinges need to withstand 50x20x12 pounds in tension 12000 pounds, without using steel and posts with welded hinges that's not going to ...


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Suggested construction: This spreads the torsional load over the entire banister railing instead of stressing only the cap or top rail. If there's any bending at the hinge, or other distortion, it will be confined to the added pieces and will leave your existing railing unaffected.


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What are you going to use as an upright member on the posts? I would do it with a 4x4 because it would add some stability when resting on top of the rail while in use. Your laundry is going to want to pull the posts in toward each other. That will put a lot of strain on the hinges, which themselves are probably fine, but will be pulling on the screws and the ...


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If you have rafters butting, you don't need the whole 2x6 ripped, right? You only need a small notch at a 10 degree angle. So grab a handsaw, mark the face and edge where you want the cut to stop, make 2 (maybe 3 or 4 if you feel like it) kerfs, then whack at the wedge with a chisel. It'll come out pretty easily. Rinse and repeat for each rafter.


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I voted to close this since it's really a construction question and belongs in the DIY site, but the best way to do this is going to be shimming up one side and running the board through a planer. Basically you'll draw your angle on the endgrain, get a piece of MDF wider and longer than your work piece, then use framing shims to get your line parallel to the ...


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That looks about 12 or 14” square and about 16” high (inside).


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To hang string lights you shouldn't need a lot of weight in the bases unless you're stringing 100' or so. For an average size yard I think what you show in the picture should be fine. I assume that you'll fill the base with with a counter-weight of stone or sand. You could use them as planters but then you'll want to put a liner in to protect the wood from ...


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Bandsaw, but still tricky. Reliable solution would be to throw away half the board (not get two usable pieces from each board) and use a router sled to plane off the wood not used. Router sleds are an amazing tool to have in your list of options, and produce great work. Traditional blended approach and probably good enough for framing is to cut both sides ...


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So add wood putty because you can always chip out when you have needs to adjust striker due to inevitable heat/cool expansion/ contraction.


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I wouldn't recommend using scaffolding boards as a worktop in a kitchen. Most scaffolding boards in the UK at least are made of Tanalised (pressure treated) timber. Tanalith E 8000 is the trade name of the preservative used and it is not recommended for use where there is direct contact between food/water and the treated timber since it is water soluble. ...


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It's really a matter of prerogative (which is why you get varied suggestions), but it sounds like you have your answer. You want to be "careful", which I interpret to mean you're willing to put in the extra expense and effort to get additional longevity. It might last 40 years instead of 30 if you let it breath. In my experience, lap siding is ...


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I don’t think there will be any issues using UHMW. It will never rot and it can be drilled and screwed it wont break under impact so I only see advantages it is a vapor / moisture barrier also. I have used it for pool projects but not often because of cost, I live just south Benton , lane and Lynn counties and they would not have a problem with UHMW.


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That wall system is a “sound control” system. There are special metal framing members running perpendicular to the studs. They are secured to the studs that allows an air space between the wallboard and stud. The metal stripping is called “RC-1 channel “. You can google it.


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That would depend on whose clothes you're hanging, Paul Bunyan's or King Kong's?? No, that type of load on the rafters would not pose a problem. You could screw two eye bolts into the bottom of the rafters and tie your clothesline to them or put hooks on he end of the clothesline and then hook it through the eye bolts for easy removal.


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That sounds safe to me. clothes-line rope is unlikely to be strong enough to damage the rafters.


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The blade looks bent. I've drawn lines along the spine of the blade as shown in the photo in the question. If we assume the background is flat, the point where my red lines cross isn't sitting on the surface, and is bent towards the camera. See also the shape of the shadow, and the non-round holes. On a non-flat background, it's possible the blade has ...


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I quote from an online article concerning saws of all kinds. Jigsaw A jigsaw is a handheld powered saw. It has a smaller blade and finer teeth than a reciprocating saw. It moves vertically. You can change the speed to make it go faster or slower. This saw is designed to cut curves and other non-straight lines. https://sawingjudge.com/different-types-of-...


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A jigsaw is fully capable of making a decent cut. Will it be as nice as a table saw or as a pull saw? No. But the cut you have here doesn't appear to have any straight lines at all. You want: Downward pressure High blade speed Don't advance the blade into the wood faster than the blade wants to cut the wood With those three things I don't think you even ...


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Ever considered why it has its name? It's designed to do just about anything except cut in a straight line! Its blade is thin, front to back, on purpose. So it can and will go round corners easily. To cut straight lines, the blade needs to be long, front to back, so it's difficult to turn. As in tenon saws, which even have a strengthener to stop them flexing,...


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As a novice-level wood cutter, I will say that what helped me the most with learning how to make straight cuts using a jigsaw was to slow down. You can certainly cut in a straight line, without a guide, if you take it slow, with some practice. More pressure against the blade equals more likelihood of not being straight - let the blade do the cutting, not ...


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If you these are due to Carpenter Bees, and I think they are, there are bee larvae inside the hole that you should deal with before sealing it. Otherwise they will hatch and drill their way out. You can buy a insecticidal dust or a foaming "spray" that will travel around the corners and get to the larvae. You can find treatments from online DIY ...


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Here are two that come to mind: Drill the tunnel out to a larger, perfectly round shape. Glue a piece of wood dowel into the hole as a plug. It's not necessary to completely fill the hollowed space -- it would be good enough to make the plug as little as 1/4 inch thick. Obtain or create some sawdust with a color similar to this wood. Mix it with epoxy, ...


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Forget the guide block. Seriously. Jigsaw blades wander for a variety of reasons, and all of them will cause you to have a non-square cut, even if you have a square guide block. Instead, practice cutting to a line. (Or more accurately, cut most of the line on the waste side.) If the 'top' of the board is supposed to be the nice side, then mark the line on ...


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Jig saws are designed for cutting curves. You can cut straight lines and generally you followed the correct procedure - using a straight edge. Your picture of the cut is pretty blurry, so it's hard to tell for sure, but there are several possibilities: The piece of wood you used as a straight edge isn't as straight as you thought. Usually one uses a metal ...


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A jigsaw isn't designed to make perfect cuts. Straight cuts can be made but the stock has to be clamped down and the fence, guide block, must be clamped down too. You can't hold down a guide block with one hand and operate the saw with the other, the guide block will move and the saw will jump, as is obvious from your pictures. Clamp everything and use both ...


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A damp proof course (DPC) is required “Under Floor Space” where there is evidence that the “water table rises to within 6” of the building perimeter or if surface water does not readily drain away from the building”. (See ICC 1807) Likewise, wood joists within 18” of the ground or beams and girders within 12” at the perimeter or under a building in a crawl ...


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As far as moisture coming up from the the foundation you need a sill barrier to prevent moisture from wicking to the wood. I usually use a foam barrier in areas with high moisture have used neoprene it is a bit more expensive but keeps the wood separation the best. My area uses DPC to stop concrete to concrete moisture transmission but it should work as well ...


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It looks like you need to plane it anyway! From that picture, it looks like that post has a lot of surface damage. Has it rattled around in the back of a pickup on the way home, to pick up all those dents and scratches? If you're worried about how it'll look, I think those should be your first thing to worry about, not a bit of superficial dirt! And ...


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Two suggestions: Try finding a different supplier. Check out another big-box store, or even better try to find a local lumberyard/sawmill. The local place may well have sawn their own on site and they'll never have been banded, so there won't be an issue. The time saved in cleaning may be worth an extra buck or two that they may charge. It should go without ...


2

Both finewoodworking.com and landscapetutorials.com recommend using oxalic acid. The first one has a powder/paste approach, likely appropriate for individual pieces. Start by sprinkling the oxalic acid powder over the stained area. Then use the toothbrush dipped in water to turn the powder into a paste. Scrub the paste gently over the stained areas. Let the ...


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Triangles are stable, squares are not. Finish the knee braces. You might be able to make them more simply by making them from narrower material that will fit between the beam members as they are (ie, they don't need to be the same width as the post, so they can be the same width as the cut-down section of the post the beam is wrapped around.) Depending on ...


3

set it on bricks or cinder blocks, or even skids made out of timber treated for on-ground use (we call that H4) you could also attach the ladder and the slide to the skids to further prevent rolling., it's not going to last forever whatever you do, it should last several years though.


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Sandbox. Put down some landscaping cloth. Put a rectangle of boards (2x6?) to contain the sand or use railroad ties or whatever you have. Connect corners robustly. Sink them into the earth with the cloth under and then staple it to the far side of each board. Fill rectangle of boards with sand. Now in addition to slide you have a sandbox! Keep those ...


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