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2

I built a drill guide jig for this. The basic concept is to secure a piece of pipe with an inside diameter just slightly larger than the auger bit. My use case was a timber frame outdoor kitchen with exposed joinery. Peg holes were 1" diameter going through 8" timbers. The jig was time-consuming to use but very accurate. Pics and YouTube video below. ...


2

I'm fairly sure it's termites. They are soft-bodied, so they don't like to be exposed to the air, as they dehydrate, so they typically stay within the wood, and eat away at the softer spring growth rings in softer woods including pine. When they run short of material they'll explore for more, and to do so, they build tunnels along the surface that protects ...


6

Looks like dry wood termite droppings (frass) or pellets to me. Google termite droppings and you’ll see many pictures.


1

I'm not sure what "chipboard" is, but your plan is ok if you use a structural sheet material (OSB or plywood). The span across the wall void is wide enough that you should find a way to support the sheet at the far side, though, or it's likely to flex a fair bit.


1

Knot stains happen when the sap of real wood transfers through the paint. Knots are full of sap, and don't fully dry out when the boards are processed. This can't happen with drywall. What does commonly transfer through drywall is water, and I would guess that what you have here is a water stain. It could be a leaky pipe fitting, or it could be ...


2

Regarding arrangement of artificial logs... Most kits come with a diagram showing the intended arrangement, and they're designed to fit a particular burner. If you don't have that, just be sure that you're not completely blocking any ports on the burner. Otherwise it's mostly a matter of decorative preference.


2

Real wood goes black as well - products of combustion commonly called soot. If the device is set properly then there will be some, but if there seems to be a lot then get the device checked.


0

My house has the same thing I just discovered it for the first time today and it was covered by shingles so I pulled the shingles off and put metal fence piece over it and nailed it and it's holding up as a good vent


0

I wouldn't be bolting the supports over the drywall. You will get movement back and forth from the bag and that movement will start to compact the drywall and eventually loosed the supports. Think about installing a 4x4 between two joists with joist hangers. Then drill a hole through the 4x4 and install a 1/2" eye bolt and hold it in place with nuts and ...


0

Use a reciprocating saw to cut the fasteners holding one of the sill/fire-block boards in place. Run the blade right through the drywall; making a slot, right where the two boards meet. The top board would be the ideal choice, as it can't fall inside the wall, when the fasteners are cut, that hold it in place. If a cripple stud is in the center, trim one of ...


1

Throw rugs will work but you'll probably end up wanting to sand and fix it right. If you do wall to wall make sure to use padding.


1

Simply, a bolt is not relying on the holding strength of the threads in wood fiber. It is a metal-to-metal sandwich that is holding boards together from both sides. A bolt connection will normally be stronger than a lag screw, but that increased strength is often not needed, and access to both sides of the joint is not always possible. If there is any ...


0

Is the problem that the rear corner or rear face of the door collides with the face (or the front edge) of the cabinet box? Concealed hinges are adjustable for the gap between the door and the cabinet box/face when the door is closed. People like the gap to be as narrow as possible, but some minimum amount of gap is needed so that the door can rotate about ...


1

Looks like 2 X 6 on 48" centers , primarily they hold the walls from bowing out, not for supporting weight. I suggest what I did for the same construction : add 2 X 6 between so it will be 24" centers. That will hold modest weight like your wheels .


1

There is very little bracing under the loft floor. It may need to be framed in more to support the weight of stored items. Tires are not that heavy, but you definitely want it to be strong enough to carry the weight of a person safely. Objects falling from that height could definitely result in personal injury, or even death. If you are unsure how to ...


3

If you're doing the herringbone inside you won't use 1x8. You'll run 1x6 all the way out. This design probably ends up the thickness of a two-by (1-1/2"), so your front frame probably shouldn't be two-by. I'd use the same 1x6 for everything (tongue-and-groove for the herringbone, square boards for the frame). If you don't use tongue-and-groove for the ...


0

Check out Diamabrush (https://diamabrush.com/). I used one in an angle grinder to strip 7 layers of sander clogging paint from 700sqft of pine flooring. It worked great.


0

You might want to try a scraper, which will do particularly well with corners. In the current era, a scraper with a reversible & replaceable tungsten carbide blade is probably your best bet unless you really enjoy sharpening/burnishing a steel scraper. A scraper can do the whole job, or assist with those parts of the job that other methods do not ...


1

I've had great results using Citristrip, (see below). I've used it indoors many times and it leaves no fumes. I've used it to strip multiple layers of paint and varnish from furniture. There are many products to choose from but I know this one works. It just goes on with a brush. Good luck, you took on a big job redoing a staircase. This product looks ...


0

I'm not sure there is a term that exists for cabinets without glaze. As you mention, this effect is really popular right now, and it's going to be difficult to find non-glazed cabinets from a big box retailer. You could try working with a dedicated cabinetmaker and express your interest in some non-glazed examples. To others who are confused by the ...


0

On an aesthetic view, would leaving them look nice and authentic/rustic? YES Furniture finishers go to great lengths to achieve what is called a distressed look. They poke holes, lash with chains, beat upon with sticks, etc. to achieve a finish that you get for free! That being said, if your decor motif is ultra-clean/modern; a rustic distressed look may ...


0

A good filler will work for the nail holes but probably won't help with the black spots because there's not enough depth for the filler to take hold. Be sure to get a filler that will take stain as many don't. These stairs were probably meant to be carpeted from the start so quality lumber wasn't used. Your best bet would be to buy/rent a belt sander and ...


0

If what you need to do is 'increase the height of the hole by a quarter inch', then the safest solution is to get a replacement medicine cabinet that will fit in the existing hole. If that's not possible, then use a saw to remove the stud that's in the way. After that, you'll need to repair the inevitable drywall damage that'll be left by the saw. This will ...


6

The idea of a true pilot hole is to physically remove the material from the wood so the body (aka 'minor diameter') of the screw doesn't have to expand the wood to make room for itself, possibly causing the wood to split. Click for larger image. Image courtesy of Home Stratosphere Using a nail to form a 'pilot hole' is simply going to expand, not remove, ...


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