Hot answers tagged

24

It's important to remember the difference between a bolt and a screw (this is handy if you don't know the size of the bolt or screw) Screws have the threads doing the work of holding. Your hole should be the size of the screw shaft. In other words, hold a drill bit above the screw. You should still see the threads, but not the shaft. Bolts have a nut doing ...


23

I take it for $700 you are paying people to do this work. And I gather these are garden variety handymen using random products bought at the local builder supply; when people say "polyurethane" without any qualifiers, they usually mean the Home Depot stuff. Have you talked to marine/boat painting places? There are a variety of products intended for ...


19

When you buy a hex bolt, the size on the label is the diameter of the shank below the head. The outside diameter (aka major diameter) of the threads will be no larger than this diameter. So for a 3/8" bolt, it's simple - you drill a 3/8" hole.


18

People use the wrong screws outside quite a lot, but thankfully there are good alternatives. Outdoor decking and fencing are commonly assembled with coated screws advertised for such. They typically come in tan or green depending on the application and can hold up for a long time without rust or staining the wood. Stainless steel screws are another option ...


14

Studs are cut to length at the mill so you can build your 8’ walls without cutting the ends off the top and bottom plates with studs make a quick tilt up wall, the rest is true 8’ 10’ 12’ . Note if remodeling verify length prior to building a wall.


13

Good on you for leveling up your knowledge and learning where not to drill or saw on joists. On that same note, here's an excellent summary from BuildingAdvisor titled Guide to Notching and Boring Joists: Don’t make any holes with a diameter greater than 1/3 the depth of a joist. No holes closer than 2 inches to the top or bottom edge. No holes closer than ...


13

This is a rare case where you want the hole to be somewhat larger than the bolt diameter, to allow some shifting and settling. For a 3/8" bolt the hole should be 1/2" or 5/8" diameter. You must use a fender washer under the nut. The squared and smoothed (deburred) ends of the side and end frame rails are what hold the leg square and prevent wobbling. The ...


12

I would just replace the trim. If you were good with an oscillating saw or sharp wood chisel you could cut the molding just above the damaged area at an angle. Remove everything from there down. When you take out the lower piece try to keep a piece that is undamaged so you can take it with you when you go searching for replacement trim. Hard to tell from ...


10

Stainless steel deck screws will not rust. I've used them many times on all types of lumber with great results. But screwing into end grain never works well, put a piece of 2x4 into each corner and screw into the sides of it. The joint will be much stronger.


10

The general term for a hinge that allows something to move but keep the same orientation is a "pantograph hinge". The general term for that type of bed would be a "Murphy bed". The pantograph mechanism takes many forms, but the trick it uses is to have parallel connecting rods that pivot together so that the door or shelf that it is connected to can swing ...


8

Yes, this can be remedied by using a "goof plate" pictured below. If the outer diameter of the lockset is 2" or larger this plate will work. I do believe they make smaller ones if the lockset is smaller. The UPC for this product is 049793095244- Model # U-9524. Package includes 2 pieces-One for each side.


8

This is a beautiful door and it would be a huge shame to paint it. (And if/when the paint does start to crack, it will look far worse than it does now!) It should absolutely be able to withstand direct sunlight for years with proper finish. Contrary to what I think Harper's answer is saying, I may disagree in part. I have had very good results with "spar ...


8

Yes, keeping lags centered in studs is important. The following is minimum for BOLTS IN WOOD: Edge distance: Perpendicular to grain: 4 times dia. Parallel to grain: 1.5 times bolt dia. End distance: When in tension: 7 times bolt dia. When in compression: 4 times dia. Center-to-Center spacing: Perpendicular to grain: 2.5 times dia. Parallel to ...


8

Generally, it's safe to be in an attic with fiberglass insulation without a mask. Is it a good idea? No. It can get into your lungs and cause the coughing you're experiencing and can also irritate your throat. the coughing you're experiencing is probably a combination of the fiberglass and the dust that settles from the venting of the attic. Do yourself a ...


7

Not clear as to where your location is but here in the USA the studs are 1.5" thick. The centerline to edge distance of the stud is 0.75". If you try to move the lag bolt over by 1.0" from the center there will be no stud for the lag bolt to go into. That is unless you get very lucky and happen to be working in an area where there is a doubled up stud. ...


6

Remove the castor, get some PL premium, glue it back on. Or just get some small pieces of wood (wooden match sticks - minus the head - and jamb those into the hole with or without glue, cut the ends of the wood pieces off flush and screw into that mess.


6

It is called 10mm here, but the rule still applies - you drill for the advertised size of the bolt. Neither the hole, nor the bolt, nor the drill bit are exactly 10mm, but everything will fit. The only notable exception is when you drill in stone/concrete/masonry with a hammer drill. The hole gets +10% - +100% larger and you never know how much.


6

Looks like dry wood termite droppings (frass) or pellets to me. Google termite droppings and you’ll see many pictures.


5

Use a thin prybar, carefully. Look closely at the joints on the bottom trim piece that's in your way, and you'll note that it's not "locked in" to the rest of the frame - because that piece was installed after the crank hardware was. Pry it out of there, replace the hardware, and tack it back in when done.


5

These are larger than 2x6 joists. That plays in your favor. A notch in a 2x6 is disastrous. The beams look OK for now. The cracks are horizontal so they're not concerning. Those can be caused by the drying of the boards or settling, and they could predate the notches. Your best bet is to reroute the pipes and full sister the beam . It has the least ...


5

You’re lucky, sort of... First, the joists are 1 5/8” x 7 1/2” not 1 1/2” x 7 1/4” if the house was built in the 1940’s. Second, the joists are not Redwood (thank goodness) they’re Douglas fir. Third, I’d classify them as No. 1 or Select Structural grade. (There’s only one grade better: Dense Select Structural.) Fourth, those hairline horizontal lines ...


5

You drill holes to the advertised size of the bolt. So a 3/8" bolt gets a 3/8" hole. In your case, alignment may prove tricky. You may need to oversize a bit for that reason.


5

I would go to the big box store and buy a small piece of trim and see if it matches. If it does then @Michael Karas has the right answer. If you cant match the trim then I would repair it with body filler. If you're not experienced with body filler, use several thin layers so you don't have to do a lot of sanding. For sanding wrap sand paper around a block ...


5

I could give you some easy tips on adjusting the door and jamb but I would only do that if there wasn't the option to - make the frame bigger (rough opening). You can plane off 1/4" on one of the sides in about 5-10 minutes and you won't be messing with the integrity of the door you bought. You can plane sloppy and with shims you are still good to go.


5

The mechanism - GRAVITY What keeps it stable - High quality materials and balanced weighting in the design. What is it? It is a high quality metal shelf with an extended arm on each side of the back. Why does it look cool? Because the arm rotation is solid yet flowing and they hid the joint inside of the side of the bed. If it stuck out it would ...


5

Since you'll be finishing the pieces in the building, lacquer is out. It stinks to high Heaven and unless you use a pre-catalized lacquer, it is prone to water stains such as condensation from a cold glass of water. I used to prefer oil based Polyurethane but that can have a strong odor too and that odor can last a while. For simple, tough, (not fancy) ...


4

You could screw up through the lower 2x4 into the top 2x4, such that the screw heads would be on the bottom of the lower board and not seen from the top. But I think there's a different question here: Why reinforce the existing board? When working on problems like this, I first try to determine the root cause of the problem. Did that 2x4 warp because a 2x4 ...


4

Adding an answer because I happened to see a video on this which has a thoughtful and detailed analysis of why wood cutting / carving with an angle grinder can be so dangerous. The video also has a "caught on video" moment of such an accident (no real gory details). IMO visualizing such an accident is very healthy mental preparation for this tool (or ...


4

I use a shellac based primer for things such as this. It has better hiding ability then just paint or regular primer. Give it two or more coats and see if it hides the problem and then you can apply the final paint. If you still see a shadow after the shellac primer you could try a coat of bonding primer over the shellac primer.


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