24

I've only refinished two hardwood floors myself but I do know a bit about woodworking given my dozen years of experience as a cabinet maker. The first floor was done with a rental rotary sander. This violates one of the cardinal rules of wood sanding: always sand with the grain. A rotary sander will leave swirl marks and you'll have to spend a lot of time ...


20

Here is how I have done it before without anything more than what I was already using, the material, pencil, a tape measure and a miter box.


19

That is just fine. The only possible downside is that if you decide to re-arrange the kitchen in the future and the area will become "uncovered", you will have to deal with it at that point. Maybe make sure you keep enough of the flooring around to fill in the remainder if needed.


19

There are arguments for not having the flooring under the cabinets at all (if it's "floating" flooring, the cabinets on top "pin" that part of the flooring to the floor so it does not "float.") In that case you'd stop 1/4-1/8" from the toe-kick at the front of the cabinet. Other than that, it's a highway for rodents and ...


18

A sliding bevel, which is a fairly low-cost tool designed for exactly this type of job - the blade can be set to match an unknown angle and locked, then it can either be measured, or used directly in setting, or used to draw a line. No affiliation with or recommendation of the image source. Or, a piece of cardboard or stiff paper (fold or cut to match the ...


18

Updated based on revisions to the question. The way I see it you have two options, neither of which is nearly as complicated as your proposed solution. Install a tile accent row with a beveled or bullnose edge or reducing edger (metal trim). This could be from leftover original tile or something else. 1/2" cement board on the subfloor boards will be ...


18

I'd only consider 20 if you know you need to remove significant material--such as when dealing with deep scratches or stains. Otherwise I'd start with 60. If that doesn't work quickly enough on the varnish, move to 36 or 40 (from elsewhere, if necessary). The coarser you go the more you have to work to remove wood in the later stages. I'm not a pro. I've ...


17

Cut a few openings in your current subfloor, spanning across from the centers of joists, and pull flex conduit (or just cable if that's all that's needed). You'll easily be able to drill through the joists with a compact drill. When you're done just glue and screw the cutouts back in place, then add your second layer. Don't fiddle around with hokey sandwich ...


16

The rest of your floor has been stained a darker color and has also weathered with exposure to air. You have a few choices of how to handle this, listed here from hardest to easiest: Refinish the entire floor and then it will all be bright and shiny like that strip. (This will be both time-consuming and expensive). Find the correct stain to match the rest ...


14

In two old homes now I've shredded the wood floor under my chair, monster splinters eventually emerging. I work at home in semi-rural New Hampshire. I think they're very old pine floors, so softwood. I plan to try Shepherd Brand Urethane Casters after putty and repainting. From the manufacturer's site, "Nylon tread for carpeting, and urethane tread ...


14

I think the solution can be even easier. Most hardware stores will carry uneven transition pieces. They're almost always wood and often are available in a variety of colored stains to match the wood floor. They are beveled in the front, so you don't have any tripping hazard, and they can be easily negotiated by wheeled devices (walkers, etc) You'll probably ...


12

Solid wood flooring in a wet area is inherently risky due to the moisture everywhere. Pine flooring (a moisture-absorbent softwood) is inherently risky to install. Solid boards are inherently more prone to cupping than engineered boards. Gluing a wood floor to concrete is inherently risky because concrete is a big sponge that absorbs and releases moisture in ...


11

The answer depends on what you are willing to accept for a finished result. Removing the quarter-round allows the edger to reach underneath what is visible when the quarter-round is re-installed. Even the most fastidious edging is going to be visible to close inspection if the trim isn't removed. The extent to which it is obvious depends largely on the ...


10

Things may be different outside the UK, but I've never found the "top coat" flooring to go all the way to wall under cabinets. The cabinets generally have extendible legs so you can get the cabinet to the correct height and level, and so it's unlikely you'll need the additional height that the flooring provides. Putting (possibly expensive) ...


9

Start with the fine stuff, if it's too slow go for the coarser stuff. from the look in the photo 60 or 100 would probably be suatable for the first pass. Hire a drum sander for the middle of the floor and an edging sander to do the perimeter, Because the edging sander works across the grain you'll need to use a finer grit on that one perhaps 240. If you ...


8

Probably you are hoping to spray some Miracle Vanishing Formula™, instantly wipe, and be good as new. Maybe it is possible to do that, or use a putty knife carefully. In the end, you will probably have added scratches, and there are probably defects and worn portions screaming for refinishing. So why not skip to the (seemingly) inevitable conclusion:...


8

@iLikeDirt covered a lot of important information, but I'd like to add something since the majority of the information assumes that there is a problem of excess moisture due to the concrete, while the expert assessment says it is actually dry cupping that is the problem. Dry cupping implies that the interior humidity is dropping below the average ...


8

I did a similar job with tiles, but stopped the tiles at the base of the cabinet. Rationale for this decision was that if a tile near the cabinet cracked or otherwise became damaged, it was easier to remove and replace than if the tile ran under the cabinet. I raised the cabinets up by the 1/4" or 3/8" thickness of the tiles (which ran under the ...


8

An oscillating tool is your friend. It looks like it would reach to the bottom nail. Looks like you were able to pull the top of the board out enough to get to the bottom nail. You also may be able to break it with a chisel, but nails are hard. Get some good blades for the osc tool, I found that a cheap blade only cuts 5-10 nails. https://www.homedepot.com/...


7

You'll need to start over, sanding out the splotches of glue. To deal with the divots of glue, they can be 'set' using a nail-set in the same manner that you'd set a nail ... or the divots of glue can be dug/scraped out ... or simply left as-is. You'll likely have similar splotches with store bought wood filler, and blotches can arise from other ...


7

I suppose I should post the solution we eventually came up with. We tried everything. Goo-gone. Soapy water. Various hardwood floor cleaners. Alcohol. Windex. Dry ice. Steam. Swiffer Wet Jet. Industrial Strength Adhesive Remover. None of these made the cleaning much easier, and even after hours of scraping and wiping, the foam still left nasty ...


7

I'd like to write an answer on the overall methodology on how to pick where to align a floor, but I don't have the chops for that. But in your case, I do have a suggestion. One of the principles of flooring installation is that it's more important to look straight than to actually be straight. For example, you have that architectural detail separating the ...


7

To elaborate a little more. When you apply a finish like poly or even paint, it doesn't just instantly go from a liquid to a solid after an hour or whatever the dry time is for the product. When it's exposed to air it slowly starts to solidify. As this happens the physical properties of the finish change. Most importantly it's workability changes. If you ...


7

I would just put down some green/blue painters tape around the spots. This tape has low-adhesion so it is less likely to remove any finish. Just make sure the builder removes the tape before refinishing.


7

I am sure they sell large pans somewhere but that shouldn't be a concern. Your freezer should be contained, in that if there is a power outage and everything melts - the water should stay in your freezer. Note: I have to think if I was putting a deep freezer on my hardwoods I would lay it on an area rug. Even insulated the freezer bottom is pretty cold ...


7

Yes you can use the existing floor as a subfloor, but I humbly submit, that the brittle cement based self leveling underlayment would not do well sandwiched between two wood surfaces, and a slew of fasteners driven through it. I seems to me the vibration, the fastener shooting through the cement would start cracking up the poured underlayment. I believe it ...


7

Talk to a hardwood installation company. You might be surprised at what they can do with your floor in your budget. It might be too expensive depending on the extent of the damage, but a lot of visual damage is actually acceptable in vintage hardwood floors, and they may be able to replace the bad pieces, resolve the squeak, and refinish the floor for a ...


7

The riser is installed first for the reason that you want a nice tight fit along the top of the riser to the tread above it. There is always the possibility that there is a small variation in the width of the riser boards or the height of the notches cut in the stair jacks. The back edge of the tread can then be slid right up to the riser for a nice tight ...


7

How do you get to Carnegie Hall? Don't discount the fact that everything was hand nailed at one point. Sheathing a building in board by hand works wonders for increasing efficiency with a hammer. One hundred years ago green or air dried lumber was the norm, rather than kiln dried. Even seasoned lumber had generally been in the air under a year at the mill. ...


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