64

Swap their positions. Place the bookcases so that they lean into each other instead of away from each other. This will eliminate the gap between the tops. Bookcase contents are usually quite heavy. Once the cases are filled, you will probably find that you can force the bottoms together and the weight of the contents will distort the shape of the cases ...


50

Use Screws Anyway If it was me, I would quietly ignore "I am not allowed to secure it using screws in the wall." We are talking about a couple of screws here, which would leave ~ 1/4" holes, not cutting out large sections of the wall. Assuming it is drywall or plaster over studs, as opposed to a brick wall, I would put in two screws (~ 2" long) through ...


39

I've built this desk twice. It costs me ~$100 USD in materials: And here is my version of the desk: You can adjust it, but it is a little difficult. However, you can fit a modified treadmill under it as you can see in this video of me using the desk. I'm able to type comfortably while walking at 2.2 MPH. If I may presume that the reason you want a ...


38

Thanks everyone; I figured it out and came back here to update my post and noticed that Michael Karas said the same thing I realized (although it was a comment, so I couldn't mark it as the correct answer): I had to pop the back off the left unit (which was actually quite easy because it was just 1/4" plywood attached with brads and no glue), re-rack the ...


35

You don't have to buy or get a framing square : just measure the diagonals... That will tell you if either or both units are out of square. If they are both ok, then look to the floor - small change in the floor will make a large gap at the top... Then you need some adjustable feet of some sort.


30

I recommend Kim Stanley Robinson's Bibliography, fleshed out with some Frank Herbert, and a large solid hardback for the top; I'm using 'The Pythons' in the case, but gardening and DIY manuals are equally good candidates. Fine tuning can be done with Asimov, Van Vogt, Niven, or Simak. You may be tempted to use Ian Livingstone and Steve Jackson, but they're ...


21

Strong and light and cheap? Take a look at torsion box construction. Granted it's not exactly thin but as @Joe mentioned, getting all four of those qualities is a tall order.


19

I haven't built anything into a recess like you describe so this is conjecture. If you're fitting it into a recess and it is encased on all 5 sides (ceiling, floor, left side, right side, back wall), you could get away with not anchoring it. Since when it tips, it would strike against the ceiling. I'd also put wedges on all sides because it's probably not a ...


16

It is impossible for the bookshelf to rotate forwards and crush anyone, child or not, the way you have drawn it. For it to fall on someone (who pulled on it, or climbed it) it would have to rotate around point A on this diagram: As you can see, before it becomes dangerously tilted the back will hit the enclosure at the top and stop it tilting further. In ...


14

The short ends you pictured are the cross grains of the board. What I see is that you have used a too coarse sandpaper on these edges. This should be easy to fix. You need to step down the grit of the sandpaper. Any final sanding should be done with 220 or 320 paper. On these end details, use fine paper, break its (paper's) back so it is flexible, and take ...


12

I don't think there is specific universal height as people aren't manufactured in a specific universal height. Googling for "workbench height" returns many results asking the same thing: what is the best height for a workbench. This page suggests the following method: A good rule of thumb is to make the workbench table the same height as the distance ...


12

There is a large body of information about what size furniture and tools should be. The field concerning sizing furniture to individuals and populations is called Anthropometrics and information about safety and ease of use is called Ergonomics. If you are building your own workbench for your own use, then you should size it to yourself unless you expect ...


12

For starters, I am going to guess you used a water based urethane instead of an oil based product? I have never seen a good oil based product react as you described to simple spills. I have seen some damage caused by very hot items being placed on a urethane finish, but normally, liquids will bead up and not penetrate the finish. Even though the water based ...


11

A more typical way to strengthen a miter joint is to use either splines or biscuits. Splines can be oriented in one of two ways. It's probably easier to show pictures than to explain in words: a) Spline running the entire miter. With this method you can also make the grooves stopped so the spline would not be visible at the edges. If you are working ...


11

The main reason is that woodworking of old days, Joinery was more of an art than a mechanised given. The structure was designed to accommodate for wood settling and fluctuating due to weather conditions (humidity etc) ... Basically, the most stable structure was one, where the weight rested on the four points which were the most stable (the legs or balls) ...


11

Some 1/2" drills will allow the chuck to open to 5/8". If you can fit a dowel in the chuck, clamp it in the chuck, touch it to a file while the drill is running. Use the drill as a low tech lathe. Just be careful to not touch the chuck with the file.


10

I have had and solved this problem. There are three wood dowels on each side between those cam lock screws. You must cut them. When you do, you will be able to tilt the side piece in order to extract the screws. I did not feel like getting out my multittool for such a small job, so I used a sharp bread knife. The dowels are not even 1/4" so you will have no ...


9

The velcro type product you posted looks like it has adhesive on both sides. The velcro itself would probably be plenty strong if the straps are large enough, but I suspect that adhesive on the wall would not work out well. It could fail too easily by simply ripping the top layer of paint off. Or, when you do want to move you are going to rip a big chunk ...


9

There's no real answer to this - it depends on how tall you are, what you are using the bench for and if you are standing or sitting (and then, are you using a chair or stool?). The use for it might also play a role. Things like electrical soldering work require you to be a lot closer to the project then wood working. The simple solution to this is to ...


9

Since the double ended screws are typically for attaching two wood surfaces together, start the screw in one of the pilot holes (just enough to stay put). Then align the other pilot hole and spin one or both pieces of wood together. For example, if this is the below end cap on a wood pole, you'd put the screw on the end of the pole so that it doesn't fall ...


9

Bolts, concrete fixing bolts, recessed, optionally plugged. Strong glue All the above


9

That would be the cam lock nut and cam screw fastener. They are commonly found in DIY assembly products sold by various retailers including IKEA. According to a recent post I've read IKEA may be looking to replace this fastener type in its products, but I haven't seen any changes yet so probably best not to hold your breath. However, there are ...


8

Dowels are probably your best bet for this fix because the tool cost is much lower for the case that you need to purchase tools to do this repair. The cost of a doweling jig is much lower than a biscuit cutter. Drilling the dowel holes is easily accomplished with an electric drill. If you end up with just a one inch wide repair strip added in then I would ...


8

You would need to mount wooden strips along the walls that screw into the studs. Then the desktop sits on top of those strips and is fastened from the underside to the strips. To achieve a more sleek look you could also consider the use of some lengths of aluminum angle iron that is screwed into the studs and into the bottom side of the desk surface. ...


8

Bolts going into a slieve like RedGrittyBrick suggested is the best answer for appearance and strength. Another option for speed and simplicity are Tapcon screws: No affiliation, and no direct experience, I'm just aware of the existence of this product.


8

You're cutting a mortise. The classic method is to drill a succession of overlapping holes, using a bit that's approximately the width of your desired mortise. You then clean it up/square it up with a (SHARP!) wood chisel. Youtube it and you can see it being done. I would advise you one small thing: I wouldn't run a mortise and tenon joint through the ...


8

There are a lot of ways you could go here. Conceal The Screws If you just make a simple butt joint like you have in your picture, you can do as @AlaskaMan says in the comments - countersink the screws and put a plug or putty over the screw head. That will hide the screw; the plug / putty will be visible but less noticeable than the screw. ...


8

I have used interscrews (e.g. from screwfix) in the past to join units together to make them line up nice and tight.


7

For holes that are the right shape, but worn, add some wood glue, and screw it back in. For a little extra friction, stick a little piece of one of those plastic coffee stirs in there too. If chunks of mdf have broken off with your screw, you'll need to cut some more away, and glue a replacement block in place. It's important to use a clamp when gluing ...


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