64

Swap their positions. Place the bookcases so that they lean into each other instead of away from each other. This will eliminate the gap between the tops. Bookcase contents are usually quite heavy. Once the cases are filled, you will probably find that you can force the bottoms together and the weight of the contents will distort the shape of the cases ...


50

Use Screws Anyway If it was me, I would quietly ignore "I am not allowed to secure it using screws in the wall." We are talking about a couple of screws here, which would leave ~ 1/4" holes, not cutting out large sections of the wall. Assuming it is drywall or plaster over studs, as opposed to a brick wall, I would put in two screws (~ 2" ...


38

Thanks everyone; I figured it out and came back here to update my post and noticed that Michael Karas said the same thing I realized (although it was a comment, so I couldn't mark it as the correct answer): I had to pop the back off the left unit (which was actually quite easy because it was just 1/4" plywood attached with brads and no glue), re-rack the ...


35

You don't have to buy or get a framing square : just measure the diagonals... That will tell you if either or both units are out of square. If they are both ok, then look to the floor - small change in the floor will make a large gap at the top... Then you need some adjustable feet of some sort.


19

I haven't built anything into a recess like you describe so this is conjecture. If you're fitting it into a recess and it is encased on all 5 sides (ceiling, floor, left side, right side, back wall), you could get away with not anchoring it. Since when it tips, it would strike against the ceiling. I'd also put wedges on all sides because it's probably not a ...


16

It is impossible for the bookshelf to rotate forwards and crush anyone, child or not, the way you have drawn it. For it to fall on someone (who pulled on it, or climbed it) it would have to rotate around point A on this diagram: As you can see, before it becomes dangerously tilted the back will hit the enclosure at the top and stop it tilting further. In ...


14

Do you need actual outlets? Chargers and lights can both be run off of USB, and a USB hub+extension cables doesn't even involve real wiring. It also works in both 120V and 240V countries with just a plug adapter as long as you get a 120/240V hub, which could be an issue if you just use regular outlets. I'm not sure there's any legal concerns, because you're ...


12

For starters, I am going to guess you used a water based urethane instead of an oil based product? I have never seen a good oil based product react as you described to simple spills. I have seen some damage caused by very hot items being placed on a urethane finish, but normally, liquids will bead up and not penetrate the finish. Even though the water based ...


11

The main reason is that woodworking of old days, Joinery was more of an art than a mechanised given. The structure was designed to accommodate for wood settling and fluctuating due to weather conditions (humidity etc) ... Basically, the most stable structure was one, where the weight rested on the four points which were the most stable (the legs or balls) ...


11

Some 1/2" drills will allow the chuck to open to 5/8". If you can fit a dowel in the chuck, clamp it in the chuck, touch it to a file while the drill is running. Use the drill as a low tech lathe. Just be careful to not touch the chuck with the file.


10

I have had and solved this problem. There are three wood dowels on each side between those cam lock screws. You must cut them. When you do, you will be able to tilt the side piece in order to extract the screws. I did not feel like getting out my multittool for such a small job, so I used a sharp bread knife. The dowels are not even 1/4" so you will have no ...


9

Since the double ended screws are typically for attaching two wood surfaces together, start the screw in one of the pilot holes (just enough to stay put). Then align the other pilot hole and spin one or both pieces of wood together. For example, if this is the below end cap on a wood pole, you'd put the screw on the end of the pole so that it doesn't fall ...


9

Bolts, concrete fixing bolts, recessed, optionally plugged. Strong glue All the above


9

That would be the cam lock nut and cam screw fastener. They are commonly found in DIY assembly products sold by various retailers including IKEA. According to a recent post I've read IKEA may be looking to replace this fastener type in its products, but I haven't seen any changes yet so probably best not to hold your breath. However, there are ...


8

Dowels are probably your best bet for this fix because the tool cost is much lower for the case that you need to purchase tools to do this repair. The cost of a doweling jig is much lower than a biscuit cutter. Drilling the dowel holes is easily accomplished with an electric drill. If you end up with just a one inch wide repair strip added in then I would ...


8

2 2x4s are not square, if that matters (3 x 3.5). They will be plenty strong as assembled posts. Try a traditional lumber yard, they will have untreated pine. Cedar may also be an option. Your structure would be better supported if you shortened 1 of the 2 paired 2x4s at each corner and made a jack-king stud arrangement like a door frame and header. The ...


8

You would need to mount wooden strips along the walls that screw into the studs. Then the desktop sits on top of those strips and is fastened from the underside to the strips. To achieve a more sleek look you could also consider the use of some lengths of aluminum angle iron that is screwed into the studs and into the bottom side of the desk surface. ...


8

Bolts going into a slieve like RedGrittyBrick suggested is the best answer for appearance and strength. Another option for speed and simplicity are Tapcon screws: No affiliation, and no direct experience, I'm just aware of the existence of this product.


8

You're cutting a mortise. The classic method is to drill a succession of overlapping holes, using a bit that's approximately the width of your desired mortise. You then clean it up/square it up with a (SHARP!) wood chisel. Youtube it and you can see it being done. I would advise you one small thing: I wouldn't run a mortise and tenon joint through the ...


8

There are a lot of ways you could go here. Conceal The Screws If you just make a simple butt joint like you have in your picture, you can do as @AlaskaMan says in the comments - countersink the screws and put a plug or putty over the screw head. That will hide the screw; the plug / putty will be visible but less noticeable than the screw. ...


8

I have used interscrews (e.g. from screwfix) in the past to join units together to make them line up nice and tight.


7

As Chris Cudmore states in his comment, it is most likely a leveling issue (the other, but less likely cause could be misaligned hinges). Place a level across the top of the front of the unit. Note whether it is level or not. Then do the same across the top of one of the sides. If the unit is tipped, but only front to back (the front test was level), you ...


7

There are common established heights for table/counter surface and seating combinations. They are: Table height: 30in (750mm), with a chair at 18in (450mm). Counter height: 36in (900mm), with stools at 24 in (600mm). Standard bar height: 42in (1050mm), stools at 30in (750mm). Extra tall bar height: 48in (1200mm), stools at 36in (900mm). (Source: runmyhouse....


7

If the threads are in metal, then you can replace the threads. What you're looking for is called a T-nut and should be available at any hardware store. Take a bolt with you to get the right size. If the threads are in the wood, a simple option is to just take the bolt to a hardware store and buy a bigger bolt. T-nuts are also a good option if a bigger bolt ...


7

It can be a problem when drying conditions are too fast for the finish to release the bubbles. Here are some strategies to try. Good quality brush, china bristle (boar) for oil Slight thinning (up to 10%). Drying extenders (retarders): Floetrol for latex, Penetrol for oil based paints and stains Don't shake your finish, stir only (to prevent mixing air ...


7

Your best bet is to sand the ends of the dowels. A belt sander or disk sander however would not be the way to sand them. There would be way too big of chance of taking off too much or creating flat spots. The best way, in my experience, is to find a way to turn the dowels and then use hand applied sandpapering technique around the dowel as it turns. The ...


7

In order for a bookshelf to topple forwards, it is necessary to have some force applied to the structure. Typically, that force is gravity. Gravity will not usually push a bookshelf out of plumb, disregarding earthquake activity for the purposes of this discussion. Your floor must be level. If not, adjust the base of the bookshelf to keep the structure ...


7

According to the IKEA instructions here, that side piece gets inserted then the cam lock thing is turned clockwise to lock it in place. I assume that removal would be the reverse - turn the screw counterclockwise. Start trying to pull it apart as you turn because the assembler may not have turned it all the way.


7

Isopropyl alcohol, "rubbing alcohol", will remove most "permanent" markers (e.g. Sharpie brand markers), but may be ineffective on ballpoint pen marks, depending on the ink formulation. For this purpose, don't bother using anything less pure than the commonly available 91%, with 99% being preferred. At 70% concentration it's commonly not effective. For ...


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