10

I am a painter and I build also and I personally will not warranty the work unless it's after 6 months. Pressure treated (PT) lumber takes months to shrink and re-contract on and off so the paint will crack and not adhere correctly. Also, the PT you buy at Lowe's or Home Depot gets moved around a lot so you may have a load of wood with boards that are weeks ...


8

This question is somewhat opinion based, but I'm going to answer anyway. If it's just a stain or oil, rather than a more solid surface/coating finish like Varathane, you're probably OK to just stain one side. With a solid coating, the problem is the wood will absorb moisture at different rates on the top of the deck from the bottom. This can lead to cupping,...


7

I wouldn't belt sand any outdoor deck, especially with a commercial belt sander that your talking about. More damage will ensue. Take the $60.00 you'll spend on the rental and buy a Makita Palm Sander. It takes a 1/4 sheet of sandpaper to load onto the pad to sand. Buy some 80 grit sheets and some 120 grit sheets. Grab a beer and get down on your knees ...


6

Already stained deck For a deck that has already been stained it would be better to use chemicals and a pressure washer than sanding. New, unstained deck For a new deck, you can use a pressure washer or you can sand it. Honestly, I have tried large floor sanders and they don't do a good job. Deck boards often are cupped and warped, if even slightly and ...


6

Your best bet is to have Sherwin-Williams do a stain match. The only thing I suggest otherwise is that when they ask you the wood type, you reply to them that you have white pine as that is what the furniture is. If I were trying to come close I would grab natural stain and satin polyurethane.


6

What you're most likely looking at is a bacteria called Serratia Marcescens. According to Wikipedia it is commonly found growing in bathrooms (especially on tile grout, shower corners, toilet water line, and basin) as well as many other places. From that source (and others), the best way to get rid of it is regular cleaning by soaking & ...


5

A little late but at least others will find this. Firstly I must add that I restore decks for a living where the outdoor elements are notorious for harsh UV rays and wide variations in moisture exposure. The deck above from the original poster has a failed acrylic based oil - sanding will give you that results as strippers will cost a small fortune and ...


5

Ummm. Primer might be the least of your concerns. I have flipped a few houses in my life and many have had heavy smokers and/or animals. If you remove all soft surfaces - carpet, curtains, anything that can retain the smoke smell - then you can try to prime it if the odor isn't insane. So after everything is out let it air out a day or two or longer. ...


5

You would (unfortunately) have to sand and stain the whole thing. Stain color is very dependent on a whole bunch of varied factors, and so the final color is always a bit of a guess. In your case, you could reapply stain to the areas you indicated, since they seem to be lighter in shade. Reapplying will darken the color and maybe get it "close enough". ...


5

Do what a professional would do - don't touch it when wet. Sand the affected areas with fine grit and re-stain, leave until it dries completely, then move, flip over and do the opposite side, etc. Apply the poly in the same manner. You cannot handle pieces until they dry fully. You also cannot handle them with hands that are wet with finish.


5

A true wood stain does not build a "film" on the surface. It only changes the color of the porous wood fiber near the surface. You will want a film-forming finish if your goal is to make it easier to clean up spilled liquids. A paint will do this, but if you want to preserve the look of the wood, then 1 to 3 coats of a polyurethane based finish will also ...


4

At a minimum, all the horizontal surfaces should be prepared. My method of choice has always been to use a pressure washer and wood cleaner. If it is particularly bad you can take a firm nylon bristled broom/scrubber and help work it in. Once the cleaner has been on for a few minutes (check the label) pressure wash the deck clean, it is the easiest and ...


4

Go to your local paint or big box store and get a color chart for the stains they carry. Often they show the stain on both oak and pine. As Veritas pointed out, you have pine. Pick the colors that come close (recommend three: one as close as possible, one lighter, one darker) and buy the smallest can possible (usually a half pint). Test each of these on an ...


4

You say a dark stain, which is good, but the peanut oil has already filled some of the space where the stain can soak in. That's bad. You don't want visibly lighter handprints on your steps. I'd go with rags liberally moistened with mineral spirits. Let them sit on the spots for half an hour or so, then scrub vigorously. You'll know if you succeeded when the ...


4

Water will raise the grain of your nice, smooth decking, requiring a re-sand. Also, rain will soak into the wood, requiring a significant dry-time delay before sealing. Yes, you should tarp it.


4

Those are match grain veneer panels. They are usually made by attaching selected hardwood veneers to plywood using contact glues. Veneers can be purchased from specialty woodworking dealers. The technique is not hard but requires some care (and practice) to get straight, bubble-free surfaces.


4

Personally, I'd power wash it and apply a thick deck restoring product since you plan to replace in a few years. This is an example of such a product, but I'm not endorsing any product or seller. This one is nice because it is tintable.


4

(Note: original question asked about using wood stain on stainless steel.)I doubt a wood stain would adhere to metal of any sort whatsoever, unless the metal was very rough and the stain settled into some of the depressions leaving some behind when the solvent evaporated. Even if it did, the color would be very succeptable to being scratched off because it ...


3

I didn't wipe the excess stain from my floors when I stained them. We made the amateur mistake of thinking we could just kind of wipe and blend and that it would all soak in eventually. It will never dry if you leave it like that. It's way easier to fix than people online are saying. You don't have to scrub with steel wool or anything. Just get a flat pad ...


3

I was eating a Wendy's burger on our wooden dining table. When I picked up the wrapper, Wendy's face was staring up at me from the tabletop! I immediately Googled and found this article. I tried a gentle surface cleaner with no luck. I read the approaches listed in this article, but was bummed as I have no mayo, no ashes, etc. My wife is an Essential ...


3

Wash and rinse walls, ceilings. Pigmented shellac. Alcohol based. You will need organic respirators if you spray it ( and turning off pilot lights during spray). Its what fire cleanup pros use.


3

What you're seeing is the difference between spring growth and the harder, thinner summer growth. Early growth (spring) is rapid, the ring is lighter colored, wider, softer and porous. Once a stain has penetrated the early growth ring, the stain is permanently part of the layer and the only way to remove it is to remove wood by sanding, planing or inlay. ...


3

If you want to color maple, you might investigate dyes rather than stains - leaves much more of the grain visible. If you're going to stain it anyway, poplar (in the lumber trade that almost always means tulip poplar) is a nice, cheap, stable wood. Has a somewhat greenish cast, but dark stain will obliterate it. Responding to Jack's comment: I've posted ...


3

Ok let's talk outdoor staining. You are right that the first thing you need to do is clean off any mold, dirt and green slime. As with decks, a good and cheap solution of TSP, bleach and water is a fine cleaner, no need for expensive premixed stuff. Using a one gallon garden sprayer, apply your TSP/bleach solution. Let it sit a bit, but not dry. Scrub with ...


3

Sanding with or against the grain doesn't matter much until the last sanding stage, if that. Lots of us use random-orbit sanders which sand in all directions at once, and that works Just Fine. The first sanding pass, with the coarsest grit sandpaper, does most of the work of levelling the surface; ideally, it should leave you with no scratches larger than ...


3

After staining give a coat of clear finish, sanding it with a fine sandpaper (400G) to remove any raised grain or any dust that may have settled onto the drying finish. This will give you a good base to add your paint and the sanded surface will give it good adhesion. Steel wool has its purpose, but I would not use it here. That's only my opinion. My ...


3

All wood coatings are essentially decorations. The only thing that keeps wood from rotting outside is proper drainage of it and airflow around it. Wood can get wet every time it rains and snows as long as it is permitted to shed water effectively and dry out quickly. When it stays wet even through days of sunshine and wind is when wood will begin to foster ...


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