11

Per the question, I used Minwax until it faded, but it was still quite obvious and visible (close to the last pic in the question post). Then, taking a page from the "mayo and ashes" tip, I mixed 1-part mayonnaise (Hellman's) to 1-part baking soda (not baking powder; I used Arm & Hammer brand) as a cigarette ashes replacement. I rubbed the mixture ...


9

If the pros couldn't do much, It sounds like the stain is there for good. Some suggestions: small throw rug/welcome mat. Just cover it up! bring in a pro to swap that bit of carpet with maybe something in a closet, or just a far corner. A good carpet pro should be able to seam it all back together. dye the entire carpet a shade or two darker. I know such ...


9

I am a painter and I build also and I personally will not warranty the work unless it's after 6 months. Pressure treated (PT) lumber takes months to shrink and re-contract on and off so the paint will crack and not adhere correctly. Also, the PT you buy at Lowe's or Home Depot gets moved around a lot so you may have a load of wood with boards that are weeks ...


7

I think I answered a question similar to this before but I actually contacted Universal Forest Products last fall about using pressure treated lumber in a basement. Tons of great stuff they sent me. Some good points: In a dry basement wait 2-3 weeks before installing drywall over (they want you to use PT for everything in the basement and they make good ...


7

I wouldn't belt sand any outdoor deck, especially with a commercial belt sander that your talking about. More damage will ensue. Take the $60.00 you'll spend on the rental and buy a Makita Palm Sander. It takes a 1/4 sheet of sandpaper to load onto the pad to sand. Buy some 80 grit sheets and some 120 grit sheets. Grab a beer and get down on your knees ...


6

The first step is to clean the deck. A very simple and inexpensive method is to wet the deck, spray or scrub on a mixture of 1 cup TSP, 1/2 gal household bleach, and 2 gal water. Scrub it with a course, stiff broom. Then either rinse with a hose or power wash off before it dries completely on the surface. this works as good it not better than expensive deck ...


6

Using a plug is your best option. Getting an exact match is pretty much impossible. A drill press is the tool of choice for a perfect plug if is conjunction with a good hole saw bit or plug cutting bit. If you can cut the plug from the same stained material in an out of sight location, this would save a lot of time. Color matching is tough to do. Keep in ...


6

Already stained deck For a deck that has already been stained it would be better to use chemicals and a pressure washer than sanding. New, unstained deck For a new deck, you can use a pressure washer or you can sand it. Honestly, I have tried large floor sanders and they don't do a good job. Deck boards often are cupped and warped, if even slightly and ...


6

Your best bet is to have Sherwin-Williams do a stain match. The only thing I suggest otherwise is that when they ask you the wood type, you reply to them that you have white pine as that is what the furniture is. If I were trying to come close I would grab natural stain and satin polyurethane.


6

What you're most likely looking at is a bacteria called Serratia Marcescens. According to Wikipedia it is commonly found growing in bathrooms (especially on tile grout, shower corners, toilet water line, and basin) as well as many other places. From that source (and others), the best way to get rid of it is regular cleaning by soaking & ...


5

Ummm. Primer might be the least of your concerns. I have flipped a few houses in my life and many have had heavy smokers and/or animals. If you remove all soft surfaces - carpet, curtains, anything that can retain the smoke smell - then you can try to prime it if the odor isn't insane. So after everything is out let it air out a day or two or longer. ...


5

You would (unfortunately) have to sand and stain the whole thing. Stain color is very dependent on a whole bunch of varied factors, and so the final color is always a bit of a guess. In your case, you could reapply stain to the areas you indicated, since they seem to be lighter in shade. Reapplying will darken the color and maybe get it "close enough". ...


5

Do what a professional would do - don't touch it when wet. Sand the affected areas with fine grit and re-stain, leave until it dries completely, then move, flip over and do the opposite side, etc. Apply the poly in the same manner. You cannot handle pieces until they dry fully. You also cannot handle them with hands that are wet with finish.


5

A true wood stain does not build a "film" on the surface. It only changes the color of the porous wood fiber near the surface. You will want a film-forming finish if your goal is to make it easier to clean up spilled liquids. A paint will do this, but if you want to preserve the look of the wood, then 1 to 3 coats of a polyurethane based finish will also ...


4

I have a huge concrete patio - and oak trees. I just mix bleach and water in my sprayer and spray the stains. Let it sit a few hours, rinse and they disappear. The reason I came to this site is to find out how to prevent the stains in the first place - saw this question and thought I'd at least contribute what I have observed on the cleaning part of the ...


4

The water based paint will come off eventually with rain and normal activity on the paving slabs, but it will take a while. The only guaranteed way is to use water and a scrubbing brush or, if you don't want to get down on your hands and knees, a stiff bristled yard brush.


4

We're thinking of staining our four year old deck soon, and my only credentials are that we've thought about this scenario. If I were you, I would go ahead and apply the first coat to the remainder of your deck, basically ensuring that all surfaces are evenly covered. If it does rain and screw up everything, at least the screw-up will be consistent. I ...


4

At a minimum, all the horizontal surfaces should be prepared. My method of choice has always been to use a pressure washer and wood cleaner. If it is particularly bad you can take a firm nylon bristled broom/scrubber and help work it in. Once the cleaner has been on for a few minutes (check the label) pressure wash the deck clean, it is the easiest and ...


4

A little late but at least others will find this. Firstly I must add that I restore decks for a living where the outdoor elements are notorious for harsh UV rays and wide variations in moisture exposure. The deck above from the original poster has a failed acrylic based oil - sanding will give you that results as strippers will cost a small fortune and ...


4

Go to your local paint or big box store and get a color chart for the stains they carry. Often they show the stain on both oak and pine. As Veritas pointed out, you have pine. Pick the colors that come close (recommend three: one as close as possible, one lighter, one darker) and buy the smallest can possible (usually a half pint). Test each of these on an ...


4

You say a dark stain, which is good, but the peanut oil has already filled some of the space where the stain can soak in. That's bad. You don't want visibly lighter handprints on your steps. I'd go with rags liberally moistened with mineral spirits. Let them sit on the spots for half an hour or so, then scrub vigorously. You'll know if you succeeded when the ...


4

Water will raise the grain of your nice, smooth decking, requiring a re-sand. Also, rain will soak into the wood, requiring a significant dry-time delay before sealing. Yes, you should tarp it.


4

Those are match grain veneer panels. They are usually made by attaching selected hardwood veneers to plywood using contact glues. Veneers can be purchased from specialty woodworking dealers. The technique is not hard but requires some care (and practice) to get straight, bubble-free surfaces.


4

Personally, I'd power wash it and apply a thick deck restoring product since you plan to replace in a few years. This is an example of such a product, but I'm not endorsing any product or seller. This one is nice because it is tintable.


3

I agree with Shirlock but I would not power wash within a week of staining. You would be surprised the amount of moisture that stays in your lumber after power washing. When I wash something I want it perfectly clean and I do tend to overdo things so do not take my findings as average but I am sure they aren't way off. I power washed my house before ...


3

I was eating a Wendy's burger on our wooden dining table. When I picked up the wrapper, Wendy's face was staring up at me from the tabletop! I immediately Googled and found this article. I tried a gentle surface cleaner with no luck. I read the approaches listed in this article, but was bummed as I have no mayo, no ashes, etc. My wife is an Essential ...


3

Regardless of sealer or other treatment, I would just keep an eye on the ropes and rungs (the wood) and replace them when they seem to be about to break. If the rope is nylon, the sun will affect that moreso than the wood. But rope is cheap, and all you need is a drill to be able to replace the rungs.


3

A small can of deck sealant should suffice. Follow manufacturer instructions, applying with a 1" trim brush.


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