15

The Minwax website says to apply another coat of stain on top of that and then once it softens up the dried stain just wipe it off like you normally would. I'm currently having the exact same problem. But I think this makes sense so thats what I'm going to try.


11

Per the question, I used Minwax until it faded, but it was still quite obvious and visible (close to the last pic in the question post). Then, taking a page from the "mayo and ashes" tip, I mixed 1-part mayonnaise (Hellman's) to 1-part baking soda (not baking powder; I used Arm & Hammer brand) as a cigarette ashes replacement. I rubbed the mixture ...


10

The finish color is dependent on two things...the stain, and the substrate (well, and some other variables as well...such as application method, length of time before you wipe it, how many coats, etc.). You can't use one stain on two substrates and expect a match anymore than you would expect finding a match with two different stains on one piece of wood. ...


9

Remove the door knob and latch mechanism. Sand the damaged area, focusing on feathering down the edge between the old finish and the now unfinished areas. Start with an 80 grit and work in steps up to 120G or even 150G depending on how much you love this door. Be careful not to get too aggressive, this looks like a veneered hollow-core door and you want to ...


9

Painting a pressure treated wood deck is always tricky. Pressure treated wood does not seem to hold paint well, even with a good primer. Stain is usually a better alternative, but since your deck already has paint, it would have to be stripped completely before using stain. In order for the paint to stick fairly well, the surface needs to be as clean and ...


9

If the pros couldn't do much, It sounds like the stain is there for good. Some suggestions: small throw rug/welcome mat. Just cover it up! bring in a pro to swap that bit of carpet with maybe something in a closet, or just a far corner. A good carpet pro should be able to seam it all back together. dye the entire carpet a shade or two darker. I know such ...


9

I am a painter and I build also and I personally will not warranty the work unless it's after 6 months. Pressure treated (PT) lumber takes months to shrink and re-contract on and off so the paint will crack and not adhere correctly. Also, the PT you buy at Lowe's or Home Depot gets moved around a lot so you may have a load of wood with boards that are weeks ...


7

I think I answered a question similar to this before but I actually contacted Universal Forest Products last fall about using pressure treated lumber in a basement. Tons of great stuff they sent me. Some good points: In a dry basement wait 2-3 weeks before installing drywall over (they want you to use PT for everything in the basement and they make good ...


7

I wouldn't belt sand any outdoor deck, especially with a commercial belt sander that your talking about. More damage will ensue. Take the $60.00 you'll spend on the rental and buy a Makita Palm Sander. It takes a 1/4 sheet of sandpaper to load onto the pad to sand. Buy some 80 grit sheets and some 120 grit sheets. Grab a beer and get down on your knees ...


6

When ever I prep a deck for restaining, I clean it with a mixture of TSP, bleach and water. I apply the mixture, scrub it with a stiff broom and rinse it well with water or a power washer. Let it dry well, then apply stain. The cleaning solution helps remove the dirt, grime, spills, etc. Pretty basic stuff, I admit. As far as why your stain doesn't want to ...


6

Ouch. Rust (and metal filings in general) is one of the hardest stains to get out of clothing. The particles are very rough if you were to look at them under a microscope, and they "tangle" themselves into most natural fibers so tightly you can't get them back out just by washing. Metals, unlike most other solids, also don't dissolve readily in water; the ...


6

Using a plug is your best option. Getting an exact match is pretty much impossible. A drill press is the tool of choice for a perfect plug if is conjunction with a good hole saw bit or plug cutting bit. If you can cut the plug from the same stained material in an out of sight location, this would save a lot of time. Color matching is tough to do. Keep in ...


6

The first step is to clean the deck. A very simple and inexpensive method is to wet the deck, spray or scrub on a mixture of 1 cup TSP, 1/2 gal household bleach, and 2 gal water. Scrub it with a course, stiff broom. Then either rinse with a hose or power wash off before it dries completely on the surface. this works as good it not better than expensive deck ...


6

Already stained deck For a deck that has already been stained it would be better to use chemicals and a pressure washer than sanding. New, unstained deck For a new deck, you can use a pressure washer or you can sand it. Honestly, I have tried large floor sanders and they don't do a good job. Deck boards often are cupped and warped, if even slightly and ...


6

Your best bet is to have Sherwin-Williams do a stain match. The only thing I suggest otherwise is that when they ask you the wood type, you reply to them that you have white pine as that is what the furniture is. If I were trying to come close I would grab natural stain and satin polyurethane.


6

What you're most likely looking at is a bacteria called Serratia Marcescens. According to Wikipedia it is commonly found growing in bathrooms (especially on tile grout, shower corners, toilet water line, and basin) as well as many other places. From that source (and others), the best way to get rid of it is regular cleaning by soaking & ...


5

If the wood feels smooth to the touch and you're happy with the color then I wouldn't worry about it. Some woods absorb extra stain without a problem. If you are worried about tackiness Apply mineral spirits with steel wool or a scrubby sponge. Clean the gunk off and dry overnight. This may make the color splotchy or lighter than you intended. If so, a ...


5

Regardless of the religious factor involved in painting hardwood trim, (lololol) if you must do it, you need to buff sand the wood, 150 or 220 is fine for this step. PRIME the trim with BINs Bullseye, pigmented shellac. After the Bins dries, very lightly sand it again with 220-400 paper or 4/0 steel wool. It will be smooth as glass. The shellac will seal ...


5

If the surface is edge grain and the previous finish was only wax, wiping down with mineral spirits and then sanding using progressively finer grits up to 220 or so should be pretty good preparation to refinish. Skip the soap and water treatment as it won't dissolve any wax and only complicates finishing. Before applying any finish the wood should be ...


5

Ummm. Primer might be the least of your concerns. I have flipped a few houses in my life and many have had heavy smokers and/or animals. If you remove all soft surfaces - carpet, curtains, anything that can retain the smoke smell - then you can try to prime it if the odor isn't insane. So after everything is out let it air out a day or two or longer. ...


5

You would (unfortunately) have to sand and stain the whole thing. Stain color is very dependent on a whole bunch of varied factors, and so the final color is always a bit of a guess. In your case, you could reapply stain to the areas you indicated, since they seem to be lighter in shade. Reapplying will darken the color and maybe get it "close enough". ...


5

Do what a professional would do - don't touch it when wet. Sand the affected areas with fine grit and re-stain, leave until it dries completely, then move, flip over and do the opposite side, etc. Apply the poly in the same manner. You cannot handle pieces until they dry fully. You also cannot handle them with hands that are wet with finish.


5

A true wood stain does not build a "film" on the surface. It only changes the color of the porous wood fiber near the surface. You will want a film-forming finish if your goal is to make it easier to clean up spilled liquids. A paint will do this, but if you want to preserve the look of the wood, then 1 to 3 coats of a polyurethane based finish will also ...


4

Have you considered wood dyes, not stains? You can buy dyes in a wide variety of colors/shades from woodworking specialty stores online. The dyes may seem expensive, but they are very concentrated, and because you can dilute them and mix them as you wish, you have a better chance of being able to fine tune the mix so that you get something that's close. ...


4

The poly simply needs to cure for a while. Even after it "dries" and is safe to work on, the solvents that keep the polymers in suspension aren't all gone; they'll continue to evaporate, and the clear coat will fully harden in time. Check the can for your particular product; it should have a full cure time. It could take up to a month if you laid on a really ...


4

I really like using a sealing primer like Bin's Bulls Eye. this is a pigmated shellac based primer that can be sanded smooth as glass. It cures very hard, blocks any stains well and is an excellent base for topcoats. For a top coat, you can use a couple of coats of good grade latex gloss or semi gloss (personal preference). If you want a really hard ...


4

This treatment only affects the surface of the wood. It's not going to weaken the table. That said, the effect of a vinegar/steel wood stain is going to vary a lot depending on the type of wood you're staining. It will be best to test your entire finishing process including the clear finish on the actual table. You can use the bottom or some other ...


4

Quick Google search turns up Modello Gel-lo Modello Gel-lo is a thickening agent for liquid coloring mediums such as acid and water-based stains for concrete. The addition of Modello Gel-lo allows for more controlled color application and helps to reduce "wicking" of the stains under the edges of the Modello patterns. And Stain Mule™. Stain ...


4

The water based paint will come off eventually with rain and normal activity on the paving slabs, but it will take a while. The only guaranteed way is to use water and a scrubbing brush or, if you don't want to get down on your hands and knees, a stiff bristled yard brush.


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