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32

I would inspect the entire property for more such pipe and replace any that was found. That's almost certainly a manufacturing defect and likely to be pending failure wherever that batch of pipe was used. That is not a natural crack, nor a corrosion crack, it's too straight and uniform. Typical "natural" cracks look like:     Possible ways it ...


18

I'll echo the comment and say that you should make sure you have a proper P-trap installed under the sink. This trap holds water and provides a seal against sewer gases getting up into the bathroom. Without one, gases will leak in constantly, and will be displaced by water down the drain which can force the gases up into the bathroom even if normally it's ...


18

Copper does erode over time through mechanical wear and chemical corrosion. My guess is that it simply got thin enough that thermal stresses popped the weld (or the extrusion resulted in a thin side, causing a very straight crack). I'd put in plastic and be happy.


15

This could be part of a larger yard drainage system. It could let water from the screened end of the pipe drain out into some buried drain field. It could also drain onto a deep buried french drain construction consisting of a sizeable hole that was filled with crushed rock or similar. The fact that the part of the pipe that has the screen is working its ...


13

Does it smell when you turn on the tap and catch the water in a bowl (so it doesn't go down the drain)? If so, it's something in the faucet. Take off the aerator cap and look for gunk inside, and/or look in the barrel of the faucet if you can to clean it out. You can also consider replacing the faucet. (I am assuming that since this only affects the ...


13

Most towns/cities will not be too happy with you, if you start cutting up their road. So you'll have to use a method that will be completely on your property. Dump some dirt The easiest solution would be to build up the area with a load of dirt. Using a wheelbarrow and a shovel, grab some dirt from another location in your yard. If you can't find a place ...


13

It's called a "standing waste". It works just like you say. The cone at the base of the inner tube seals against a flange and the water must fill the outer tube (attached to your floor) before (over)flowing down the inner tube. Here's a pic since words are useless for describing this kind of thing. Here's some in-depth discussion on resolving a clog on ...


13

The water in the wash tub will drain out if the drain in the wall is lower than the water level in the washing machine. Simple physics, water seeks its own level. The drain located at the recommended height will allow the water to remain and allow the pump to remove the water at the end of the cycle.


13

Looks like a rain gutter or sump pump outlet. Place a noisy device directed into it and walk around and listen. You could probably bury the white pipe and just leave the grille exposed, flush with the lawn.


13

TLDR; As a one-off use, Drano® is fine provided you aren't cleaning your floor or doing a couple loads of whites on the same day. What independent studies say: According to a 2004 paper by Cornell researchers titled "Household Chemicals and your septic system", despite the assertions of the corporations making Drano® and Liquid-Plumr®, these products can ...


13

It seems pretty unlikely that the drainpipe would freeze in your crawlspace. Even if there was a 20 degree wind whipping through it (which there isn't: it's enclosed), the only way that could be is if there was standing water in the pipe to freeze. That would mean a trap in the crawlspace which would be highly unusual. And if you really had a frozen pipe, ...


12

No problem, as long as the vent meets the criteria listed below. Not directly below a door, openable window, or other air intake opening (of this or any other building). Not within 10 feet horizontally of the above mentioned openings, unless it's 3 feet above them. Not less than 10 feet from the property line. Not less than 10 feet above the ground. Not ...


12

Because the standard tub drain has a sharp right-angle T junction where the overflow and tub drain meet (this is also where the stopper is located if the stopper is operated by a lever on the overflow plate, as opposed to an in-the-tub stopper or rubber stopper over the drain.) The sharp right-angle is not friendly to snakes passing, and the stopper, if ...


11

You are correct that floor drains do need to be monitored and occasionally the trap refilled with water. So the first thing to check is that your floor drain actually has a trap. The way to do that is to slowly pour water in to the drain. You should notice the water level rise and stay there. If the water disappears quickly then it's likely you don't have a ...


11

The lettering on the drain cover leads to a number of similar (but not exactly the same) products all over the 'net. What is consistent about this particular company's line of products is that the words "snap-in" appear frequently. The image above differs from yours in that your "tab" area is much thinner and does not show clearly any tabs. If you are able ...


10

As long as the p-trap is lower than the drainage from the basin then you can install it. It can also be lower than your exit pipe you need to drain into You attach the p-trap directly to the drainage and manuever the p-traps exits into you existing drain. It is not ideal to have the p-trap below the the exit drain because water gravity has to force the ...


10

Your tub has an overflow drain. You just have to find it. Remove the two screws next to the combination drain toggle & overflow plate. Now gently pull up to reveal the overflow hole and the drain plug: Get out your snake (you've got a snake, right?) and thread it down the newly revealed hole. Also remove the single screw holding the drain screen. Use ...


10

Most commercial-grade ice makers don't maintain freezing temperatures in the actual ice bin; the ice itself keeps the temperature cold in the bin, and the refrigerator coil then only has to freeze the ice tray. This strategy has several advantages: The "cold" side of the refrigeration coil can be placed inside the bin, right against the tray, so it makes ...


9

It sounds to me like you don't have two unconnected drain lines, you have ONE drain line that starts at the fridge and ends at the sink. If you stopper the sink end its just going to fill up the drain line and back up into the filter. You need to install a tie in for the 3/8" line under the sink before the trap. Do not hook it in to the main drain after ...


9

You can use something like the non-toxic RV antifreeze which evaporates more slowly than water; Or wash the basement floor occasionally. A touch of mineral oil (the stuff sold for putting in people) may help to prevent evaporation by forming a surface film, but don't overdo that.


9

If that was the case the bathwater would melt the ice plug in short order (unless it was totally blocked). I suspect a common debris plug. Also, it usually takes much colder weather to freeze things in a crawl space. Geothermal heat typically prevents it unless you have a lot of ventilation. Cast iron corrodes and accumulates very hard crud over time. You ...


9

You have a combination of a partial blockage somewhere in the drain system combined with something that causes too much water at one time to come through. Since this doesn't happen "all the time", you have to figure out what item(s) trigger the problem. The solution will depend on where the problem is. Water will always flow out of the lowest possible open ...


8

A 1 1/4" female FIP adapter worked perfectly. As soon as I saw it, I was embarassed for not having thought of it earlier. I used some teflon tape, screwed the FIP adapter onto the adapter coming out of the wall, then just glued my 1 1/4" pipe directly into it. No reduction in pipe sizes, and 100% ABS parts.


8

Here is what I ended up with. It doesn't contradict the code and inspector signed all the papers. I am not sure if he really looked at it, though.


8

You must have a vent above the vertical run for these drains. As drawn, water from your new work cannot draw air behind it from your existing work. This is what vents do: draw air in behind draining water. You could functionally combine all the new work drains as drawn into a single vertical vent, but remember that it needs to be able to draw air from ...


8

It's an NDS Pro pop-up drainage emitter http://www.ndspro.com/catalog/category/view/s/pop-up-emitters/id/227/ I took the approach of noticing the acronym on the cap, figuring out what company it was and seeing which of their products match.


8

How to unclog it !!! WARNING !!! Put on gloves, and full face protection gear! NaOH can cause severe burns or even permanently blind you. You wouldn't want even a droplet on your eyes, since (unlike your skin) they have no protection at all. (Before trying my method below, give a try to the other suggestion by @Jaroslav Voller. Try not to pierce the pipe ...


8

What you describe sounds like a Gravity Fed Hot water re-circulation system. It's designed to keep hot water available at the kitchen sink without having to flush cold water out of the pipe first. The trade off is waste heat because the line out to the kitchen sink in your case is always kept hot. Sometimes these systems have a pump, but they don't need ...


8

1:Can multiple bathroom sinks, baths, showers ect share a common drain pipe ? Yes they can and do all the time. If so are there any rules? of course there are the International Plumbers Code being one of them - and depending on what other rules your locality has adopted. Now on to your issue : Did this problem just start (on previously working system)? ...


8

Back in the 1970's the company that I worked for ran into a slew of copper tubing sizes through 3" that was manufactured with a defect that weakened the whole length of the copper. Since the copper was new the supplier replaced all the tubing (pipe) that was installed. This could be a similar problem. As "Isherwood" said, just replace it with plastic. I have ...


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