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10

Your tub has an overflow drain. You just have to find it. Remove the two screws next to the combination drain toggle & overflow plate. Now gently pull up to reveal the overflow hole and the drain plug: Get out your snake (you've got a snake, right?) and thread it down the newly revealed hole. Also remove the single screw holding the drain screen. Use ...


8

How to unclog it !!! WARNING !!! Put on gloves, and full face protection gear! NaOH can cause severe burns or even permanently blind you. You wouldn't want even a droplet on your eyes, since (unlike your skin) they have no protection at all. (Before trying my method below, give a try to the other suggestion by @Jaroslav Voller. Try not to pierce the pipe ...


7

The toilet auger is designed to protect the visible finish at the bottom of your toilet where a drain auger could leave scratch marks. It's also possible for a drain auger to get twisted inside of the large diameter of the toilet drain. Given the issues with the drain auger, I'd recommend going back and getting one designed for the toilet.


7

Sounds like the chewed up gunk from the disposal has largely blocked the drain pipe. Try a plunger first (block all other connected drains) but that may or may not be effective depending on how far along the clog is. If the simple solution doesn't work, you'll have to open a clean-out (or the U-trap) and use an auger to break it out. You can rent a "snake"...


6

If the sink is backing up into the toilet, then the clog is at or after the junction of the two in your drain lines. You'll have to snake the drain to remove the clog, and it will likely be beyond the reach of a standard toilet auger. You could remove the trap on your sink and attempt to snake it from there, or remove the toilet and run the snake down that ...


6

I just faced the same problem recently - a NaOH plug. I solved it using citric acid. Instead of using straws, I used a piece of hard wire and I was hitting the hard NaOH clog mechanically. After each stroke, a reaction on NaOH and citric acid was apparent (boiling like effect, bubbles coming out of the sink). After a couple of minutes, the clog had ...


5

Sounds to me like your sink and toilet run to the same sewer line and the clog is after they join. You won't be able to plunge it free because the water will push back up the drain towards the sink rather than applying pressure on the clog. Even plugging the sink drain won't help because there is a vent stack that will be open (and you don't want to risk ...


5

The cover for the bath plug includes the overflow drain. The bottom has an opening that is your overflow drain. If you remove the cover of the over flow to snake it, exercise care not to drop any parts down either drain. And be gentle with the snake so that you don't damage the drain plug assembly. If you use the plungers, remember that you're trying to ...


4

One frequent cause of backups is that a root from a tree or large bush has grown into the pipe. If that's happened to you, you'll need to dig up the clogged area to sever the root and then repair the pipe, or if it's a porous drain pipe, wrap it in a landscaping fabric. As Tester says, use a snake to see what you can find. You can also measure the distance ...


4

You probably (and hopefully) have a large amount of sand/grout stuck in the P trap. If so your best bet would be to remove the P trap and give it a good thorough cleaning (out in the yard, with a hose). (While the trap is off you'll be able to inspect the tailpiece and the drain line as it goes into the wall and clean those up too if necessary.) If you can'...


4

It it is a new build, then removing the trap under the sink will not be an issue. Just loosen the nuts, remove the trap (have a pan underneath) and then clean the trap. This is most likely the source of the slow draining. If the trap looks clean, then get a hand auger (snake) to clean the drain line. It is best to do this with the trap out. Hand augers ...


4

Acid. Vinegar, Citric (aka sour salt), CLR, Barkeepers friend, phosphoric, etc. Keep applying (and re-applying) it, and see if perhaps you can get dry citric acid or barkeepers friend mixed to a "paste" or "slurry" form that might cling to the problem area - or fill the trap with acid and use sections of rope or rags (secured against going down the drain) to ...


3

The plumber you had out kind of left you hanging. He should have put a camera down there to give you more details on what is going on. Basically your septic tank is backing up or you have an issue with the main line. It could be slight collapsed or pinched or have roots growing in it or whatever. So your first step is to have someone come out with ...


3

If the soap doesn't work, I'd go with a drain zip before going to a snake. There are a lot of brands, burt basically a drain zip is a three dollar, 2.5 foot (3/4 meter) long flat, bendy piece of plastic, with plastic barbs along the sides. It's great for getting hairballs out of the shower drain, and should bend its way quite nicely through the toilet to the ...


3

Water usually seeps past most blockages, but not always. You may have to hand bail the bowl down 1/3 or 1/2. THEN employ a plunger. The older cup plungers worked best with a strong UP pull (hence the bowl draining). If its a newer, smaller tank, an older cup plunger may not make a tight fit: This style may work better and will both push and pull ...


3

You are going to need to "pig" the line. You will need to insert something very slightly smaller than the pipe diameter (so it doesn't get stuck!) into the pump side of the pipe (i.e. where the whiffle ball wants to go "to") a tennis ball or racquet ball might work, so might just some crumpled up news paper. Seal your pig into the pipe and rig up a fitting ...


3

The first (and most likely) place it's stuck is at the top bend inside the toilet. That's usually a rather tight turn. The second place is at the bottom, either above or below the floor flange. The bend going into the house drain stack is usually fairly gentle but there are ridges that can catch larger objects. In short, there is no simple way to answer "...


3

I just cleared an extremely difficult NaOH blockage in my bathroom sink. Gallons of water went in, and I spent 20 minutes working at it with the straw. While I could see there was a reaction between the NaOH and the toilet descaler I was using it wasn't enough. Then I had an idea that worked in 60 seconds! I got the steam generator I use for general ...


3

You basically have three main options for a cleanout: Roof. Most home during that era, especially with cast iron have a full clean out on the roof vent. Main stack on lowest level. This would be basements in some homes but guessing you don't have one. Without a basement these can be on the first level or crawl space, usually first level. If there is a ...


3

I always let mine dry and then take it out back and put the torch to it. It does leave some residue, which is very easily and quickly removed with a wire brush.


3

In general, a one-time slip-up dumping grease down the sink won't cause any clogs. Grease creates clogs over time, by building up layer upon layer inside the pipe until water cannot pass through (easily) anymore. This is most usually a problem with greases that are solid at room temperature but liquid at cooking temperature (or under hot water). When hot, ...


3

There's a good chance the clog is in the trap right under the sink. Someone should try to remove it and clean it out. If it's not the trap, get a cheap drain snake and run it down the drain with the trap off. I'm not sure any of the drain cleaners would work on spackle. Good luck.


2

The chemical I know for cleaning mortar is muriatic acid. You should be able to find it in a home improvement store. You might try pouring a cup or two down the drain and letting it sit for a few hours before hitting it with a plumbers snake and a lot of hot water. My only word of caution is that I don't know if it would react with the drain pipes at all, ...


2

Look under the sink to know for sure, but you likely need a combination of pipe wrenches (cast iron) or screw drivers (compression fittings) or possibly just your hand (hand-screwed PVC joints). Be sure to unplug the garbage disposal first. What has likely happened is that it's your disposal that's clogged rather than the pipe. Disposals can't handle ...


2

Have a look at the trap under your sink. Assuming it's PVC with large plastic nuts, all you should need is ChannelLock pliers: Unscrew the trap from the wall and disposal, and clean the trap itself, or snake the drain going into the wall, depending on where your clog is. Be sure to have a bucket and towels handy since there will be water backed up before ...


2

You'll need an auger to clear the clog in the pipes: Loosen the clamp at the metal end and begin inserting the snake (metal coily wire) into the pipe until you hit the blockage (or get stuck in a corner). Tighten the clamp and turn the plastic handle to spin the snake. That will help penetrate the blockage (or realign the snake to get it around the ...


2

I would start by removing the trap, putting a bucket underneath the tailpiece (below the sink) and just running some water and seeing what happens. Clean out the trap while you're at it and make sure there isn't a mess of hair stuck in there. If it all comes through without a problem and doesn't back up, then I would suggest buying a snake and going ...


2

You have a 3-year old (deep sigh) - odds are pretty good it's not a 2-week old subscription card (ought to be pretty much mush by now) but some other object likely flushed more recently. My slow-toilet (unreliable) magic trick is dishwashing liquid, which sometimes (but not always) lubricates things enough to make plunging far more effective. Just a little ...


2

You can often determine the whether the threading is right or left handed by looking closely at the first thread between the edge of the fitting. Your picture is not clear enough to tell this from the photo but this shows where to look. That said it is a pretty good guess that you would turn as shown below to remove. This is the conventional direction for ...


2

I can tell you that in my area (we have full blown winters) the snaking is required once a year. You may be able to stretch in in a dry spell to two years, but is it worth the risk? Your alternative is to pull up the tree, or to change your drains to PVC, both of which are expensive vs snaking every year.


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