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38

I'm not an expert to tell you whether this is actually a good idea, but an AC unit used for heating is called a heat pump. There are two differences between "a heat pump" and "an air conditioner": Heat pumps contain a reversing valve which reverses the operation so that what would usually be the cold side gets hot and the hot side cools instead. The ...


29

Yes, this would work, but I caution you to consider that the hot side of the A/C could produce airborne water droplets full of bacteria. The typical through-window or through-wall air conditioner condenses water on the cool side and channels this water to a condensate tray on the hot side. The condenser fan typically has fan blades joined by an outer ring ...


9

This would work fine, go for it! The efficiency will come from the differences in temperatures between the heating and cooling elements and the room temperatures, the greater the difference the greater the efficiently (or effectiveness). An HVAC (Heating Ventilation, Air Conditioning) person or store will be able to help you with the calculations, even if ...


5

It's similar to the reasoning behind using a filter for your AC units. You want to filter the air to prevent clogging up the coils and dirtying up the ducts. There is a lot of moisture in a bathroom and if you mix that up with dust and lint from towels you've got a combination of particles that will stick to the blades of the fan and also clog up the shaft ...


5

It sounds like a good plan. but you're right that the controls will be regulating the heat in the wrong room. If you can find a unit that takes an external (to the unit) dumb thermostat, a thermostat could be positioned in the proofer room and used to command heat from the AC. Else you're going to need to have the air conditioner modified to meet your ...


5

The zone board's gone bad Since upstairs is broken, yet downstairs is fine, and it's not a thermostat issue, I'd point the finger at the zone board having something wrong with it. Just to make sure, try pulling the upstairs thermostat and jumpering R to W on its base; if the heat doesn't come on, then something's dead with the W input for that zone.


4

Unconventional Alternative I see you have three problems, which you reasonably note may be related: Too much heat on the oven side Too little heat on the proofing side Too little humidity on the proofing side, due to heating the air While a heat pump will certainly solve your problem, I claim that it might actually be overkill. You see, a heat pump is ...


3

OK, I have heard from multiple HVAC contractors that a general rule of thumb in a single trunk return, single trunk supply duct system, the RETURN:SUPPLY ratio should be 1:1 or greater. In other words, the return should always be at least as large as the supply. And preferably the return should be larger than the supply.


3

A split A/C would avoid big openings in the wall (only a small hole for a pipe/tube is needed), is not expensive and would allow to freely position the elements. And can be extended by a 2nd or 3rd unit if needed resp. for redundancy.


2

Since tenants are involved, you'll need to do this right If you were owner-occupying a zoned single-family dwelling, then taking shortcuts in the interest of expediency would be an acceptable way to get rough estimates of zone energy usage for your own uses. However, you're not in that situation; you're dealing with tenants instead, which brings real ...


2

One option to consider would be a set of pillars under each individual floor board, wedged or glued firmly in place, perhaps only secured on the bottom to allow for thermal movement. This concept extended within my grey matter to suggest a plank running across all the floor boards, but with holes across the span to provide for the airflow. The pillars ...


2

I believe that this document is for your unit and it indicates a 3amp fuse. Refer page 29, the trouble shooting section, top row, 5th column


2

I would probably use window 12 over number 1 because that is where the heat load is and the room is larger. 3 or 5 are both good options but I would use 3 because of the proximity for the discharge to blow towards the family room. If this were my place I would install mini splits , last week I saw an advertisement for a top brand 12k btu mini split with a ...


2

This isn't quite an "answer" but too long for a comment. Very interesting and energy efficient idea, very creative! OK, here goes my solution and I would welcome others (esp. the "big 3") to contribute and hopefully improve this suggestion. This would definitely be a "one off" approach. The bottom line parts are: 1) A thermostat (tstat) in the ...


2

You may have the issue of a reduced flow rate as the system has been designed so that all the components “match”. This could cause poor performance or even overheating as the motor works harder. You could contact the manufacturer for their advice.


1

Try to find the installation papers for the furnace and check the installation specs. Most blower motors are 4 speed. As far as the noise is concerned, I just replaced my 20 year old furnace with a new Goodman unit and it is very loud compared to the old unit. With most of the newer units today, you can not just reduce the blower speed since it may cause the ...


1

Many of the very old houses had gravity style furnaces that utilized large registers and grills that offered very low resistance to the flow of air. Since there were no fans or blowers the delivery pipes and registers had to be very large. Depending on the size of your room/house update it may be a good idea to ask an HVAC company for a bid on a duct work ...


1

I have installed quite a few registers like that but have never found them for sale. I have made them out of scraps of polypropylene, and UHMW. Most had to be shaped on 1 side a belt sander worked well for that holding the plastic with pliers. A few I could put in without shaping but not very many. Note if you drill the hole with a drill it needs to be ...


1

Choose your window based on your usage and what is important to you. Two things to consider, the cooling effect of course, and the noise and aesthetics. If the cooling is more important to you than the noise, then mount in the room where you spend the most time or would get the most comfort from it. Two units will give you much better coverage than one unit....


1

I'm not an HVAC guy so I don't know the CFM requirements but I believe that you could use 2x4 blocking that would leave over 3-1/2" depth should be plenty for air flow. Assuming that you are comfortable with that air flow, use 2x4 blocking with Simpson A35 clips and screws for attachment. You might be an extension on your power driver to reach the far side. ...


1

Thinking of using an AC system similar to Rimworld pc game? It is not going to work, efficiently. You are using R22 or R123a gas as a heating fluid? Thouse systems operating at an ambient temperatures around 45-55 C? And you wont be getting a thermal shut-off if you reached your desired heating temprature. So you wont be having any cooling nor ...


1

The idea is good and pretty much possible. Constructing it from off-the-shelf parts can be only a little tricky. First, I am yet to see an AC unit capable of humidifying a room (drying is trivial and will happen by itself, but is not what you need). The temperature controls are not necessarily on the cool side. Where I live, AC units are used more for ...


1

I think this is a clever idea, and doable with a pretty simple hack. If you locate an ordinary hardwired thermostat in the proofer room, and tie the heating terminals on the thermostat to the cooling terminals on the air conditioner, you should get what you're looking for. That will limit your options to units with terminals for an external thermostat. ...


1

So, I have an original(?) Honeywell controller. It has two T terminals, and two F terminals: The T's go to the thermostat... one provides constant 25v (or higher, mine is 30v), the other is the return to complete the circuit. The constant 25v ties directly to one terminal on the low voltage side of the transformer inside the controler, the return ties ...


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