Hot answers tagged

28

HELL NO Whichever joker is installing an 80% furnace with a PVC pipe for the exhaust needs their license revoked pronto, because that's a patent CO hazard. Non-condensing appliances operate at flue temperatures well above the safe working temperatures of PVC or any other plastic, and thus need to be vented using a metal B-vent. (Conversely, condensing ...


20

A 'simple' solution would be a lockable cover over the socket. It'll work with existing plugs (So you don't need to rewire anything), and could work in conjunction with other measures A quick google search (for "lockable socket cover") suggests that there's a few different styles of this Even if you don't use a lock, something like a cable tie (...


6

If your AC unit was running correctly before the thermostat failed, then it will be OK to run it continuously until the AM when you plan to shut it off. Just don't freeze tonight because it won't be cycling on and off. When weather is extremely hot, AC units can run continuously and many do down here in South Florida. Just replace the thermostat as soon as ...


6

Are you sure that contractor is not secretly a hitman? I give him props for creativity, that's for sure! On a serious note, furnaces with efficiency of less than 90% must be vented via metal pipe above your roof line. The exhaust is hot and extremely gaseous. You don't want the gases creeping into your house through your eaves/soffit nor an open window/door. ...


5

Problem #1: It can kill you If you have a modern, competently built house, you have a very tight house that does not like to leak air from outside. That is for heating/cooling efficiency. Air is a thing, it's not just magic. If you push air out of a well-sealed house, it will draw a vacuum on the house, just like charging an air compressor tank, but in ...


4

In the UK I'd look for a "flex outlet plate" There are switched and unswitched variations. You can get them with fish switches (simple key-operated switch). There are also modular plates that might let you combine a flex outlet with a conventional dual-pole (DP) keyed isolator switch - a local electrician could advise whether that is possible. ...


4

What's the threat-model? People consciously unplugging it or somebody tripping on it? If someone trips on it then it's preferable for it to unplug instead of fully tripping the person. I've walked through a cord before while carrying something heavy and I really appreciate that I ripped the plug out of the socket instead of me falling down. A piece of tape ...


4

Are switched-outlets code-legal where you are? They are the standard way to have loads that must be isolatable, but rarely so. These either have a hole at the front for the flex to come out of, or (as in this example) the flex is attached to the back. These are sized for a standard UK single socket or light switch. https://www.screwfix.com/p/mk-logic-plus-...


4

Considering that the unit has a microcontroller-based control board (unless it's really old or really old-tech) then yes, things like brownouts or other transients can cause it to get into an odd state and a "reboot" may help. It's not the compressor itself but the electronics that are controlling the compressor.


4

Replacing the ductwork shouldn't be extremely expensive. Even if it was moderately expensive, I'd still do it. Mold/sewage/ etc is nasty.


4

if you have a clamp meter you can check the current draw of the compressor. A too high current indicates either a stalled compressor or the compressor spinning freely not doing any compressing. It is also possible that an internal part of the compressor failed which would also need replacement of the compressor. Replacing a compressor requires both ...


3

The corrosion/patina on the copper might seem like a bad thing because you're used to rust on steel, but it's not the same process. Rust on steel doesn't form a good bond on the metal, it expands, and it flakes off, exposing more steel that then rusts and flakes off, etc. It's a destructive process. Copper an aluminum corrode much, much slower because the ...


3

After the circuit breaker failed too, I was forced to call out my HVAC guy who installed it last year, so I suppose I have a definitive verdict now. It was in fact a bad capacitor on the compressor, just like in this question with very similar symptoms to mine. It was still under warranty, so no problem there. Of course the circuit breaker was probably ...


3

The feeder needs to be correctly breakered at the supply end. That is 2 AWG (33.6 mm2) aluminum AA-8000 feeder. It is only good for 90 amps.* If the supply breaker is 100A, that's a common blunder due to misreading NEC. Change the breaker to 90A. Determining whether you have the amps to spare And adding a 20A to this subpanel is fine given that it's ...


2

I know this thread is super old but I hope it can help someone else seeking answers. I had the exact same problem, random parts of the house had electricity while other didn't. At some points the lights were flickering, then they stopped. Refrigerator and microwave worked but stove didn't. Checked the box but that wasn't the issue. Shortly after I received a ...


2

The sensible order of operation is: Switch to high-efficiency appliances first since their exhaust will be routed via PVC through your rim joist This will eliminate your appliance dependency on your chimney I don't know your budget. If you want to do the furnace and water tank at the same time then great or you can stagger them. Water heaters should be ...


2

Let me start by saying I am not an HVAC professional. But I’ve dealt with this a few times before. The chimney liner may not be be necessary if you are upgrading both your water heater and furnace as neither will likely vent through the chimney. The tankless definitely will not. If you go with a high efficiency furnace, it cannot use the chimney either. ...


2

Imagine you had a working thermostat and you flipped it to "A/C" and set the temperature to 50F. The thermostat would "call for cooling" so long as the temperature is above 50F. Since I bet your system would never get there, that means it would "call for cooling" continuously. That is fine. If your heat pump unit can't run ...


2

Make sure the filters were installed in the unit. They are sometimes left out during construction when the units are tested due to all the dust. they might have forgot to install them. If they are there, clean them or replace them. Not really a good idea to disable ventilation units.


2

It's most likely to be an induction motor. Its speed depends on the frequency of the AC supply, not the voltage. To reduce its speed you'll need a lower frequency. A variable frequency drive is the "normal" way of achieving that, but you might be able to hack it by, for example, adjusting the governor on a portable electric generator to reduce ...


2

Today's heat pumps blow gas out of the water for you, especially given how awful your new furnace is Given your location, the current rates your utility provider (KUB) charges of $1.0189/therm for all therms of gas over the first 30 (and higher for the first 30 therms) and $0.09186/kWh for residential electricity (or lower for offpeak), 23°F for your ...


2

TL;DR Check your lease and state regulations for a "Repair and Deduct" clause. You might be within your right to schedule a repair yourself and deduct it from the rent. Aside from it being vehemently disgusting I would classify indoor second-hand smoke as a fairly serious habitability problem. You might consider reporting it to the health ...


2

The only thing that could be happening in this case is a broken wire, or a bad splice. A solid, continuous wire will have voltage on the other end, even if its partially damaged. A damaged wire will not have the current carrying capacity (amps) that a good wire does, but it will show voltage. Also, since this is alternating current, the 2 volts you're ...


2

The insulation the contractor is referring to, is the insulation on the heat pump refrigerant lines. * This is not the fiberglass or rockwool insulation that homes have to keep out the outside cold/hot. That would not normally exist between interior spaces, anyway. It's a tubular pipe insulation that goes around the pipes. It works best if it is a vapor ...


2

The datasheet for your panel says it is a 6 slot, 12 circuit panel, which means it should be compatible with tandem breakers. A tandem breaker is two small breakers that take up the same slot as one full sized breaker. But you have all double-pole breakers... Well, they make a solution for that too which is two tandem breakers joined together. The middle ...


1

There is not. They're pretty easy to pop off, so I just pull mine off and plug the back into a standard USB charger.


1

What is your end-goal exactly, get new refrigerant for next to nil? He indicated that he may be able to reuse the same refrigerant if he finds that it hasn't been too contaminated once he recovers it and the pipes look clean (if the compressor oil didn't mix with it). Sounds like this person is trying to be nice and looking to save you a few bucks. I ...


1

Are you planning to purchase an existing home or build your home from the ground up? If building from the ground up it might be interesting to look into geothermal climate control.


1

It's true that a swamp cooler and a humidifier (together with its associated furnace/air handler) both have "blow air around" and "make the air wet" on their lists of features. But the scale at which they do those things is so different that it doesn't make sense to have one piece of equipment do both jobs. Furnace air flow: about 1000 ...


1

If your ventilator is exhausting air from the apartment, then air (and dust) are being drawn in someplace. If the ventilator filters air and discharges it back into the apartment , it is not a problem.


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