Hot answers tagged

18

That is a drum trap. [Evidently also called a bottle trap in some parts of the world, per comments] They are rather old school, and out of favor in code now. I'm more used to finding them embedded in a floor with the clean-out on top (for a tub application) but yours does seem to have the cleanout down. Fair warning - they seem to be above average at "...


13

Bring your Ptrap up or your Sanitary Tee down. AS noted by others you can cut the tail of the piece where it goes into the top of the Ptrap shorter ( thereby bringing the Ptrap up ), This will allow you to have the down hill slope you need for the disposal. You may need a longer tail piece from the bell on the basin into the tee from the disposal. OR ...


12

In the OP's installation the last horizontal run going into the vertical drain appears to be slightly higher than the horizontal run coming from the disposer. I think this will cause the horizontal disposer run to retain liquid. It appears that some of any liquid waste going into the left sink drain would flow back into the disposer. It seems to me that the ...


11

The best repair for this problem is to cut the trap from the drain pipe, glue on an ABS 1 1/2 inch (or same pipe diameter as existing pipe) coupling and than a short section of new pipe long enough to bring the trap under the sink tail piece. You wll have a little bit of leeway because the trap section can pivot from the threaded connection.


10

try setting it up like this. you will have to trim the dishwasher feed tail pipe a bit (be sure to bring it up high like @DMoores pictures to keep the sink from draining into the dishwasher.


7

You DO realize you can (perhaps even "are supposed to") cut excess length from the slip-fit trap parts? They are supplied long, but don't need to STAY that way. You can cut most of the tube leading to the trap off, thus raising the trap. Opioninated commentary: I'd also lose the "flex section" on the other side of the trap - it is the part of this setup ...


6

If you reconfigure so that the trap connects directly to the tailpiece you'll have all the height you need. In fact, you'll need a tailpiece extension (or new, longer tailpiece). Clean up all the compression fittings and snug them up. If they're aligned as nature intended and haven't been damaged too much by being cockeyed, they'll hold water. You could ...


5

Plumber's putty is usually soft. If it is hard (you mentioned chiseling it off), it's more likely some sort of epoxy putty that someone used to try to repair a broken pipe, and those things rarely work for long. I would expect to find a broken drain line that was too far into the wall to fix easily, or an old pipe that was cut off too close to a fitting to ...


4

The flange piece connected to the sink looks like it isn't mounted flush and could cause leaks. Readjusting the garbage disposal might fix that. It also looks like you have enough room to get rid of that adjustable trap and install a regular one. The "jog" in that trap and the excessive length will probably cause water to rise into that sink when you run the ...


4

I'll try to answer your questions as stated. Minimum height difference I'm not sure if there is a code for this, but it's good practice to have the bottom of the disposal drain higher than the top of the drain into the wall. So a height difference of at least one pipe-width. But, as long as the bottom of your tailpiece is higher than the wall drain, the ...


4

Honestly if you want to do this right you need to completely change your start and finish. The start I would highly suggest with installing a garbage disposal. Dishwasher into garbage disposal, go straight out pvc and into p trap (pvc), out to wall pvc, and then the appropriate connector into wall (example connector). There are also disposals made for ...


4

You have half (which is about 1/3 of, but it's one of two parts) a union trap there. Another union trap might fit it - if not, you can install the whole new union trap on the pipe. Being black, it's almost certainly ABS, not PVC. That matters for the type of glue you use on any fittings, for instance.


3

Most of them are 89 degree bends (not 90 degrees) so they have about 1 degree of slope which is all that is needed. most diagrams exaggerate the slope so that the reader can see it, and so that the picture will fit on the page.


3

You do not use cement or any sealant on the threads of a p-trap. It would not do any good and would bond the threads and so prevent adjustment. The purpose of the threads in these drain elements is to compress the joint. The seal is made by rubber or plastic ring seals or the faces of the two parts of the p-trap.


3

Try loosening the chrome nut at the wall and then reset the trap and tighten it up. I know "they" say to hand tighten but if the two pieces don't line up perfectly, then a little help is needed. Give it an extra eighth of a turn with a pair of Chanellocks, making sure you're not cross threaded and then tighten the chrome nut at the wall.


3

You should be able to turn the clamp nut by the wall... ...which will allow the horizontal portion of the drain connection to pull out of the wall. It may have enough slide connection so it can be reclamped to use the existing pipe to reach the new down spout on the sink. If it is not long enough then you will need to purchase new parts to achieve a ...


3

It looks like the hole drilled on the outlet side of the p-trap needs to be enlarged so the hub of the fitting can slip in, thus leveling the p-trap, thus keeping it from sticking out of the wall, however, ideally, and by most codes, there needs to be a larger drop directly from the installed washerbox, because as piped, when the washer drains, water will ...


3

It was the slope, when cutting in the p trap I changed the slope of the existing 2" drain pipe, and caused it to back up. Re-did it and ensured the slope was correct and checked with a hose and a manual regen and all drains fine.


3

It is acting as a vent, it should be above the the sanitary tee. In a washing machine drain set up the Drain goes to a Ptrap and then into the side inlet of the san tee, Vent goes out from top of tee to vent or an AAV.


2

The only thing I see in the code is “A dry vent connecting to a horizontal drain shall connect above the centerline of the horizontal drain pipe.”, so as long the wye is angled up (which it would be to get the slope you described), I think you would be good. I am not a plumber, so I advise waiting on some more experienced advise.


2

In your 4th photo you have the sanitary tee oriented improperly ( horizontally instead of vertically ) but in your 6th photo you have it correct ( but you have an incorrect fitting on the top ). The sanitary tee will sit on the straight drain pipe going down through the bottom of the cabinet, it will accept the pipe coming from the trap. Depending on space ...


2

Cut your T off and move it down is the way to fix this. Leave the T upstream of your trap connected, cut the T off the pipe coming through the floor approximately an 1"- 1.5" below the T. Eliminate the flex piece and screw your trap together. This will give you a gauge of how much more pipe to cut off the drain to insert a coupling. Done. Extend your ...


2

Maximum water trap height is 4", that's the distance between bottom of P trap and height of P trap outflow.


2

The procedure described is accurate. My advice: Hire your plumber (or a different plumber, if yours doesn't have the equipment) to inspect the drain with a camera to confirm that the trap is the only part of the drain that is damaged. You don't want to dig up the trap only to find later that there are additional issues and you don't want to do "...


2

Don't know what country you're in but from a physics perspective you could certainly do it. You seem to know the basics about the depth of the weir. The other things you need to consider is to avoid building an S trap. The tail from the P trap needs to come off of it horizontally with a 1/4" per foot slope to the drain and note the max lengths of pipe below. ...


2

It's probably fine. ABS cement hardens in seconds -- probably in less than 20 seconds the joint would be locked up enough that it would not be easily moved by hand. A joint won't be cured enough to withstand any meaningful amount of water pressure that fast -- a plumber would probably get an unhappy surprise if he cemented test plugs or fittings into place ...


2

All the fittings you see there (including the one just inside the wall) are compression fittings. You can loosen the nuts and take everything apart. Then install your cabinet and reassemble the trap. Pay attention to which direction the tapered plastic washers are oriented. A strong person can hand-tighten those enough so they don't leak. The rest of us ...


2

You should cut the 2" main line (at the location shown in the first picture) and rebuild the assembly entirely, eliminating the combi (reducing tee) and any 1 1/2" components and orienting a new 2" sanitary tee to the correct angle to line up with a new 2" trap located directly under the shower drain. Why on earth would you reduce to 1 1/...


2

With the new photo your trap appears to be perfect. I find that traps have a fairly large operating range the important thing is that they hold water and yours will hold enough water to prevent sewer gas from backing up into the home. If you are having any issues let us know but with the air admittance valve and your setup I don’t see any problems.


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