31

What you want is a basin wrench: (Source) The left end pivots so you can reach up under the sink and access the nut. That said, you have some serious corrosion going on there. You might have to go with destructive methods, perhaps involving grinding off the top of the faucet.


13

April 13, 2016 Purpose: There is some disagreement as to whether boiling water can be poured down a residential kitchen sink without damaging the drain pipe. It might be assumed that if the pipe drains quickly, the amount of time necessary to cause damage would be greater than the actual time that the boiling water would be present in any particular ...


12

Yes - that's a "tailpiece" - the new one may be too long, if so, they are made that way so you can cut them to fit - but there's also considerable space to slide them built into the connections, so don't overdo cutting them down.


10

That's known as a slip joint. If you remove the slip nut, you should find a beveled washer on the pipe. To put the joint together, you'll slide the slip nut onto the upper pipe, followed by the beveled washer (bevel side down). Then you'll slip the upper pipe inside the lower pipe, and use the nut to tighten the joint. Looks like it's a waste tee similar ...


9

You could use a box spanner, the pipe will go up the body of the spanner and the pin used to turn the spanner is not fixed. I have used basin wrenches ( I know them as tap wrenches ) but sometime get frustrated with them!


7

I know this has gotten a bit off topic, but in an attempt to answer the question - according to my wife, a hygienist - your best bet is to use: Fluoridated toothpaste Take a fluoride supplement However, I am specifically asking about ways to add fluoride to tap water and I am not asking about these alternative methods. Too much fluoride can harm you. ...


7

File a bit of steel pipe so that you have two pins that match the notches in the nut - this will lengthen the nut to a point where you can apply normal tools.


6

In the UK this would be called a compression waste fitting. There is a rubber ring that goes around the pipe, and is squashed by tightening the nut, in order to achieve a watertight seal. The pipe should go past the nut, into the fitting, until it stops. This would probably be an inch (25mm) or slightly more. To fix the joint: Unscrew the nut Remove the ...


6

You should find a set screw under the small colored plug.


6

If it is warpage (that should be a word)... you can sand out that area given this isn't stone. You could sand a groove for that and set the back into it. I am just look at a picture but it looks like the back of the sink has a little bend on it (is the other side look exactly the same?). The first 80% seems straight though. So I am not sure if that bend ...


5

First of all, do you in fact have PVC pipes? Lots of older houses have cast iron end-to-end, so nothing at all to worry about in that case. Even if you do have PVC, I don't think there's any serious concern, with the very slight possibility of an effect the drain trap (if any) right under the sink. While continuous immersion in 100° C water might soften ...


5

Most commercially purchased drop in sinks as easy to remove and reinstall. Only custom built ins are not so easy. Commercial drop ins are held in place by clamps up under the sink and or silicone RTV. When removing in future the clamps are loosened and the RTV cut away. The sink pulled and cleaned then reused. Check the sink you plan to purchase and see ...


5

The round hole/port where the conduit fitting is located is actually a threaded port. If you unscrew the locking nut on the fitting, you will then be able to unscrew the threaded conduit fitting from the threaded port. Threaded port: Seal-tite conduit connector:


5

I believe this is not uncommon. The circuit must be protected by an RCD (RCBO). There is usually a means of disconnecting or isolating the socket from above if the socket is inaccessible when appliances are installed. However see NICEIC/ELECSA Guide to Electrical Work in the Kitchen Electrical sockets or switches should be fitted at a safe distance (it ...


5

I think for a temporary fix you could use a good two-part epoxy. I don't consider it a DIY thing to completely restore a sink like that, but there are companies that refresh bathtubs. I'm not sure what they apply would be robust enough for a sink, though. From the look of the nearby chips and the crack extending from the new damage, that sink has served ...


5

It looks like my glass/ bottle washer. Is there a knob that turns the hot water on? Mine only had hot water ran the sink until hot set the glass on the wash push the button it would go for 20~ seconds great for rinsing home brew bottles out, those I had to hold the bottle in place because I lost the holder.


5

I do not think that it is technically a "washer". It is more for rinsing a glass, by itself it is not enough to wash the glass. These are used in bars for draft beer. If you rinse a pint/beer glass with cold water just before you fill it with draft beer it will prevent the the beer for foaming to much which will result in to big of a head on the beer. As ...


5

It could possibly be a clean out valve. These valves are often found under sinks which clog easily and/or often (like the kitchen sink), because they provide an easy way for a plumber to access the clog. It is much easier for a plumber to access a clog in a drainpipe that has a clean out valve, because the plumber can access the clog through the valve, which ...


4

You need to use a pair of long nose pliers like this: There is also a good bet that an ordinary pair of pliers would do the trick as well:


4

It is a "push-to-connect" fitting. You disconnect by pushing the tube, pushing the gray ring, then (while still pushing the gray ring) pulling the tube:


4

To avoid cross-threading, spin it backwards until you feel it drop into another thread; this is where and when it's lined up. First attach it to the sink and then fight with other connection, leaving everything lose until it's all fitted together. For the fitting you have, turn this picture up-side down: (make sure the grommet is properly orientated) The ...


4

This looks like it's a renovation, or maybe just an island sink, because of the anti-siphon valve (aka air admittance valve (AAV), aka cheater vent). Either way, it's fairly sloppy plumbing by the looks of it. I'll leave aside the use of the AAV as I've never seen one like that: in many jurisdictions they're not allowed at all, and I've only ever seen ones ...


4

(A) is to save you from composting. It's a Garbage Disposal, it's just for food & food scraps & you only turn it on when the water is running down its hole. It grinds everything up into little bits, so never put your hand in it or leave any utensils or other hard objects in there, they can damage it & be damaged. Turn the Water on, turn the ...


4

In the UK I've never seen a kitchen sink without an overflow. They're universal on bathtubs as well. While they may not get used much in common use, they do come into their own if you get distracted while running washing up water, and distractions are common in kitchens, especially if you're trying to clean as you go.


4

Is there a joint under that escutcheon? If so, why not run an elbow toward the back wall, then an elbow upward to a vertical pipe, then an elbow forward to a conventional p-trap? This would effectively reduce the risk of siphoning water that an s-trap creates. If there is not enough distance in back of the pipe, the whole elbow/p-trap thing could be ...


4

If you see a leak as you describe then there is a bad seal in the slip joint between the black ABS plastic fitting and the tail pipe that slides inside the black pipe. The seal normally consists of a rubber, silicone or neoprene washer that fits over the tail piece and under the plastic compression nut as shown here: In normal installation the compression ...


4

Your undersink setup is quite unusual. Normally you wouldn't see three independent P-traps. What's happening is that as your dishwasher drains its siphoning water out of the other traps. This allows sewer gasses to rise through the sink drains. To correct this, have your undersink area replumbed to have only one P-trap with the other drain sources ...


3

It seems that Moen has an outstanding customer support, and after emailing them a couple pictures of my faucet to confirm the model they emailed me back instructions to replace the cartridge (along with a confirmation of the cartridge my model was using). S o basically: Turn water supply off Use an allen wrench to remove the faucet's handle Grab the collar ...


3

Fill void with water and use a toilet plunger. Failing that, you're going to need to drill it and insert a screw.


3

Nail clippers, for anyone reading this in future. It just happened to me with water in the sink. I spent an hour unsuccessfully trying to pry it out with a butter knife. I couldn't find a plunger or pliers, so I used the best thing at my disposal and thankfully it worked. Just open your clippers and rap them around the rubber ridge in the middle of your plug ...


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