Hot answers tagged

17

As both bib and Johnny have said, the simplest way to do this is to use two separate ropes. You can either manually pull on both ropes at the same time, or the ropes can be tied together prior to each reaching its first pulley away from the wall (A & B in the image below). Alternately, as Alchymist mentioned in a comment, you can use a single rope with ...


11

In theory, a perfectly balanced load and frictionless pulleys would result in a level rise. But lack of balance and friction are always with us. The simplest way to ensure a level rise is to use two separate ropes, tied together on the pulling end, similar to the mechanism for venetian blinds. Note that the load is divided by 4 in the current setup (two ...


10

Bearings tend to wear out as a result of repeated cyclical loads. As a rule of thumb, based on fatigue failure of metals: The damage done by a single cycle of a load is proportional to the load raised to the power of 3 or 3.3. When the total of the damage done reaches some threshold, the part will fail. The threshold cannot quite be predicted in advance. ...


9

You have a combination of a partial blockage somewhere in the drain system combined with something that causes too much water at one time to come through. Since this doesn't happen "all the time", you have to figure out what item(s) trigger the problem. The solution will depend on where the problem is. Water will always flow out of the lowest possible open ...


6

It looks to me like a drain clean-out. If your drain pipes clog deep in the system, the cap can be removed to get a fairly straight shot down to the common sewer for a roto-rooter-type machine. You should probably find a new location to add one in its place.


5

Any size you like so long as you are not overloading the machine. Limit the loads to the size the machine is designed for, but don't engage in only running the smallest possible load for no good reason; this isn't a good reason. But don't load 20 lbs of clothes if the manual says 15 is the limit. That being said, smaller load with more rotations suits most ...


5

Expanding drain plug, fits into inside diameter of pipe than expands to seal when the nut is tightened.


5

No, this is not a code requirement for laundry rooms in dwelling units (at least in the 2012 IBC). In fact, most dryers are essentially acting as exhaust fans when they run because they take air from the room and exhaust it outside.


5

While I don't disagree with Bib, Johnny, or Makyen, you could just terminate the ropes to the ceiling at both ends of the clothes bar, and tie a pull rope to the center of the rope like this: the result will pull the bar up in a generally level fashion, so long as the load on the bar is fairly evenly distributed. Fewer pulleys, less rope.


5

OR you can use deep notches in the bar to separate and fix the clothes hangers in their places and when the second pulley starts to work and bar levels up in the topmost position your hangers are where you left them.


5

NEC article 210.8(A) lists areas requiring GFCI protection and not only are garages listed, but the last item on the list is "laundry areas", with no exceptions listed (nationally, your local codes may vary). So yes, you must use a GFCI either way. The 6' distance exception only pertains to sinks and bath tubs, not laundry areas, because it must be used in ...


5

The issue was with the breaker at the service panel. I replaced the breaker with a new one and since then we've not had any voltage drops.


5

If you had hit a copper or plastic pipe, you probably would have drilled further after pushing a little harder. I think it is most likely that you hit a nail plate. These are steel plates that are attached to the studs in locations where electrical cable or various pipes pass through. Their job is to prevent these items from being damaged by a drill or nail, ...


4

this is a common problem and is most easily remedied by one of two approaches (and this is entirely assuming the unit is in good working order and the harmonic balancer is in good shape and balance) 1) restrain the unit - just mount angle iron or wood or whatever around the base to keep it from moving. just ensure that you have a thick foam pad or strip ...


4

Looks like you hit the pros and cons of the washer tray pretty well :-) Couple of things I'd consider: Since the room is tile and concrete, is there a drain in the floor? If so, adding a washer tray is rather unnecessary and I'd leave it out, just ensure that the floor and tile are properly sealed. (I have seen washer trays that pretty much are the same ...


4

You can't tap a cable like that - NEC has a whole section called the "tap rules" which describe when you can do that, and this is not one of those times. Even if you could, it would be a lost cause: Since a washer must be provisioned for 20A, that plus the 30A dryer puts you at 50A, and you'd need to run the expensive 6/3 cable. Here's what you can do: ...


4

A standard laundry room inside a home is normally classified as a dry location. Sheetrock on the walls? This is a clue it is dry as defined by code. There can be a washer or a basin directly adjacent to a breaker box. An outlet would need to be GFCI protected. Other than a clothes closet and a bathroom your panel can go just about anyplace that has a 30” ...


3

According to the National Electrical Code, yes it should be a 20 ampere branch circuit. This circuit should also not have any other outlets, other than the ones for "laundry equipment". So keep the 15 ampere circuit for your general use receptacles, and run a new 20 ampere circuit for the "laundry equipment". Also note that the ...


3

All dryers need a vent. Gas and electric dryers need a vent to the outside of the house to allow all the moisture to escape from the dryer. All-in-one washer/dryer combo units don't need an air vent, but need a water drain to remove the water from the drying stage (which you need anyways to drain the wash cycle). The walls are irrelevant. So don't worry ...


3

Take the incoming hot (black) and wirenut it to black pigtails going to the brass LINE HOT screws on each GFCI. Take the incoming neutral (white) and wirenut it to white pigtails going to the silver LINE NEUTRAL screws on each GFCI. Take all the grounds and wirenut them to each other and to bare pigtails to the green ground screws on each GFCI -- if you're ...


3

1) "Is this burn residue?" It could be that the plating of the part reacted to heat or something being dried (ie. with a rubber backing) stuck to the part long enough to cause the marks. On rare occasions there is an issue with the part's plating or the heat controls of the dryer. Dryers shouldn't exceed 135-150 F. Clogged vent exhaust flues are the ...


3

Take a look at the lid switch. On some machines, the lid switch only interrupts the spin cycle. But it may be required to be closed for everything on this machine. The lid switch can fail with little or no warning and should, ideally, fail open rather than closed.


3

While perhaps functional at present, the current arrangement does not allow for easy maintenance, which will be required after a couple years of filling with lint. It appears that it would be almost impossible to remove and replace the hose to clean it out when it clogs with lint (which WILL happen sooner or later) without cutting into the drywall. IMO that'...


3

No, this is very amateurish work. I cannot imagine what they were thinking. They had to know, even while they were doing it, that they were cutting corners. A proper routing of the hose and vent should have been part of the scope of work. Failing that, they should have built a recess around the hose area.


3

You need proper slope on the pipe—depending on the location of the drain and the location of the stack this may be difficult. At least with a crawlspace assuming sewer level is lower than the floor (ceiling assembly of the crawlspace) you should be able to make a giant mess of pipes that just hang and not have to touch framing. A builder will ...


3

You should reference Arizona's 13 "Golden Rules" listed in the Arizona Dept. of Environmental Quality's "Gray Water at Home" brochure. I don't think you need any special permits or permissions to use gray water in Arizona, as long as you abide by those 13 BMPs (Best Management Practices): Gray Water at Home


3

I would change the door to the garage to open out into the garage. Having noted that "public and commercial buildings" require doors to open outwards for egress, I prefer that direction for doors in my house, despite it being "unusual" for homes, for some reason. Change the other door as well, if you like - a pocket door takes more work, ...


3

If those are between 1/4" and 3/8" in diameter, they're old plastic drywall anchors. If your shelf covers them, don't worry at all. If they're visible, slice the flange off with a knife or chisel, push the remaining plastic into the wall cavity and spackle to fix. If nothing else, these will tell you where your stud isn't. (And you'll really need ...


2

Washington State requires a minimum 50 CFM exhaust fan in the laundry room.


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