7

In NYC, you will have 208V power. It's 3-phase, but that won't be an issue. Grounding path Through discussion, we've determined fairly conclusively that a) this complex's wiring is grounded, and b) the grounding is via conduit or AC cable jackets, NOT individually run ground wires. OP reports that his "sub?" Panel has no ground wires at all, yet ...


4

Yeah, that's BX/AC, so ground to the box Looking at your closeup shot, I can tell that between the fact that the cable armor is stopped by the fitting (instead of a cable jacket, which will poke out into the box through the cable clamp as a general rule), the lack of a ground wire entering the box (which rules out type MC), and the individual paper wraps ...


3

Yes there is normally a gap between the OTR and the cabinet above it. If you review the install instructions usually the gap is 1". The gap is almost required and the typically U shaped metal mount on the back wall requires that the OTR be tilted in to be installed. The tilting then requires that both the air output and the electrical cord coming out of ...


2

Click on the link you posted at the top of your question. Look at the frame pictures to the left. In the middle is a small picture. Click on it and it shows the a,b,c,d,e, etc. Good luck


2

You should be fine If this breaker truly is only serving the hood (I'd double check that with a plug-in radio in each of the kitchen outlets with this breaker off), then you'll be fine with putting the microwave/hood on there. If there are kitchen outlets on this breaker, then I would limit the input (nameplate) power of the microwave/hood to 1.2kW (which ...


2

I think it would be OK. If the microwave and the stove are the only things on the circuit, the stove is likely only pulling electricity for the clock and lights, spark ignition, etc. That's how mine is hooked up in my present home and the one we had before that, and we've had no issues in either case.


2

This might not be the best answer, but personally I'd just go ahead and do it. Newer microwaves don't take as much power as the older ones. If the breaker trips in the future, then run a dedicated circuit to it. If the breaker never trips, then leave it that way forever.


2

While the "flush" or "integrated handle" style door is common, it's likely that this particular design with this particular molding profile is proprietary. They were probably cheap to purchase initially due to economy of scale, but they may no longer be in production. You may be better off refinishing the wood (sand, stain, seal), and if necessary reapply ...


1

I actually did replicate one of these doors. Problem was that it was fiber board and swelled up. Luckily, it was covered with white laminate so I was able to build a new door and then refinished the wood strip and use it to finished it off. A fair amount of work but worth it. Plus, it gave me an excuse to buy a router table and some neat router bits.


1

12 inches above the floor is really cutting it close. Most cabinets have a kick toe of 6 inches so you'd only have 6 inches to install and work the trap. I'd be looking at 16 to 18 inches above the floor. Good luck.


1

Yes, it looks like this is a switch loop type wiring arrangement. The black in the /3 cable brings "hot" from the breaker panel. It then goes to the TAGGED/MARKED white wire in the /2 cable, which is the always-hot wire going up to the disposal switch. The switch does (or does not) connect the TAGGED/MARKED white "always-hot" wire to the disposal's "...


1

My first concern looking at the subpanel is if that bare #6AL is in fact a ground and the two appliances are straight 240V then the two white wires connect to the buss should have some green tape on them. If it's not a ground but actually a neutral, where are the grounds? You will need to ground everything. I would try utilizing the #6AL XHHW since ...


1

Those are probably a reference to a diagram in the installation guide. They aren't industry standards that can be translated in the abstract. See page 5.


1

There is a "Servo Drive" brand of cabinet door and drawer opening system which may be what they are referring to: Servo-Drive web site I suppose that there may be other vendors with similar products, but in some places the actual name, "SERVO-DRIVE" may be a registered trademark by this company.


1

To my mind, servos are typically used in control-gear, not the sort of thing I'd associate with cabinets. Personally, I'd use something like: The cabinets are electrically driven ... or The cabinets have motor drive ...


1

Here is the site I used just two months ago for a part. Most Moen faucets are guaranteed for life. Let us know what happens. Good luck. https://www.moen.com/parts


1

Given the weight carried, is it possible to put in proper drawer slides? Shim out supports from the sides of the cabinet to support the slides. Warning: After converting one, you will probably want to switch them all.


1

You might want to try installing a rail on the bottom frame of the drawer along with the two rollers, one on each side. Then attach the roller bracket to the back of the drawer. You'll be supporting the drawer from the bottom, not the top. Ideally, the rail should be centered but the support from the drawer below might be in the way but being a little left ...


1

If the drawer doesn't fall on the trip to the back limit, it would indicate that the plastic hanger is doing fine until it reaches the end of the support rod. Perhaps you'll find unusual wear on the far end of the rod. As an option, consider to reverse the hanger clip so that it is on the inside of the drawer, shifting the hang point clear of the (possibly) ...


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