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26

Tape it. You are not proposing this kludge as a permanent fix. That's good. The wrap-tape products are good for an emergency bodge, and that's what you are proposing, on a temporary basis. The problem with them is when they manage to stop the leak and then folks decide not to call the plumber (or do the plumbing themselves, whichever) after all. I would also ...


13

What you have is not solid. There's a foam or cellular interior to the pipe with two thin layers of sold ABS on the outside. It costs less and weighs less than solid pipe. Thus it's popular at home stores that compete on price. Not every jurisdiction allows use of cellular pipe. However it's common in the USA. You need to be careful about backfilling ...


9

I agree with @jeff wheeler that all of these temp fixes are more work than a proper repair: go to the hardware store and buy ABS pipe in the same diameter. You can buy it in either 2 foot or 10 foot lengths, whatever is appropriate. Buy two couplers in same diameter, called rubber fernco couplers.. Have store associate show you how to connect them as "...


8

I would do one of two things, depending on access and tool availability: Make a Pipe Patch Cut a suitable length of scrap 3" pipe, then rip slightly less than half of it out lengthwise. Apply purple primer to the outer surface of the old pipe and the inner surface of the new pipe. Apply pipe cement to those surfaces, then snap the patch in place over ...


5

yes, you can use it, just re-prime it. You'll see that the fresh coat of primer with melt right through the dried primer.


4

Residential clothes dryers typically vent at a temperature of around 130°-165°F (54°-74°C). Wikipedia gives the glass transition temperature (colloquially the melting point) of ABS as 221°F (105°C). Even assuming that you get a perfect heat transfer, you'll be fine.


4

It's ABS cement, you should be fine. IIRC, the "yellow stuff" is the typical multi-plastic version that's somewhat more commonly found (IMPE) and can join ABS, PVC, CPVC, or any mixture of them - around this area, ABS is rarely seen other than already installed in old installations, so the yellow stuff is more useful to folks who need to repair or adapt it ...


3

Your pipe is 1" trade size. It's very standard and you'll have no trouble finding parts. The "trade size" is a weird thing that happens with pipe. Actual size is somewhat larger than trade size. (a rule of thumb is an extra 3/8", that works for common household sizes up to 2-1/2"). Why? Different materials and grades of pipes need different wall ...


3

The scope of your project requires an equally large scope of preparation. Swap out the ladder for a scaffold system. Replace the hand drill with, at a minimum, a drill jig to keep alignment while you drill. Use drill bits designed for drilling plastic to prevent cracking. Your emphasis on avoiding splintering/cracking increases the importance of proper drill ...


3

No, it is not. If you read the manufacturers' instruction on the ABS cement it says to seat the pipe completely in the hub. Now... I have cheated the above instruction on more than one occasion but never to that extent. If you are careful, gluing to 1/2" of pipe will probably not leak immediately. The problem is that the strength of the joint will be ...


3

The simplest option, assuming that the flange would not stand too high above the finished floor, is to do nothing. The wax ring used to seal between the flange and the toilet can take up quite a lot of misalignment. If the difference from the high side to the low side is less than maybe 1/4 inch (or even more, possibly) it'll be fine. I'm not sure that a ...


3

There is a GREAT ABS repair product, you can actually use it to fabricate ABS tanks for RVs and campers, using it to weld-glue abs panels together. The product is called PlastiMend-black. You will need to cease using the upstairs sinks before and for several hours after you apply the patch for it to properly bond. (area need to be dry when applied. the ...


3

If you happen to have one, a 3D printer pen* can act like a plastic welder in this case. I would recommend against doing this for PVC, but ABS is what those pens often already use. I'd first drill a tiny hole, as I suggested in a comment on Ecnerwal good answer. It doesn't have to be large, just 1/16" (~2mm) at each end of the crack to relieve stress. ...


2

If it were me, I'd install a new sanitary tee in the main drain, just above the existing sanitary tee. I'd have the standpipe for the washer come down into a P-trap, and connect the other end to the new tee. However, you'll have to make sure the standpipe is at least 18" above the trap weir. If that height cannot be maintained, you'll have to move some ...


2

Oatey says the cement is to be applied while the primer is damp. So, apply a small amount of new primer before gluing and glue after it has dried for a half a minute or so. http://newsite.oatey.com/Channel/FAQ.html#Q08 Oatey says NOT to use primer on ABS only cleaner. http://www.oatey.com/products/plastic-pipe-cements-and-primers/oatey-primers.


2

My standard procedure for dealing with shallow angle bends when none of the prefab sizes are right, is two of them. Obviously you can get the bend you want with two 90's; my point is this works with shallower angles too. You simply have the bends in different planes, so they add up to the correct angle in a third plane.


2

Cutting is the only way to get it off, I doubt that it was original most homes that age were galvanized & cast iron. The supply looks to be galvanized is the reason I would think it’s not original. They didn’t leave any good place to cut it from what I see. You will probably need to remove the expanding foam hopefully there will be a hub or something you ...


2

I recently did something similar in my house. There was a transition from ABS to PVC already in place, and it was simply made using what I assume was regular PVC cement/glue. It held fine, the only reason I had to remove it was because I needed to move the pipes out of the way for something else. I ended up using a coupling for the purpose with pipe clamps ...


2

It appears in the photo that the pipe stub coming out of the wall has some extra length that could be removed, a new "Y" installed which would give you the needed space. It's a little difficult to judge the length but it appears there is a good 2" there.


2

Be quite difficult to use a normal abs coupling here. The couplings have a stop built into them and you typically need flexibility in the two ends being joined. These look concreted in. If the connection is going to receive concrete on top of it I don't see any risk of this separating. Rubber does tend to age, get brittle and crack over time. I'd ...


2

It looks like that reducer is cemented on to a 22 1/2 degree sweep and separating them will really a job. You best bet would be to remove both those pieces because you don't know exactly which piece is leaking. Cut that second piece where it comes out of the wall as close to the bent as possible to save as much of the protruding pipe so you can cement a new ...


1

Why do you need a coupler? I would undo the u bend outlet, shorten and re tighten.


1

I would never even consider using 1.5" or 2" PVC or ABS piping of any schedule as a structural member; expecially for the application that you describe. These materials can flex and given some aging or overextended stress could fail dramatically. Sure you may be able to make 5" or 6" diameter thick walled piping work in this application but the cost of ...


1

Misalignment or size change would be a reason to to use a Fernco. I have also used them to cut an existing pipe and add an additional drain; this may be the reason it was used with a wye to the left. If the pipes are in the ground or under footings this is the way to make a connection as there is probably not enough flex to add a glued fitting--we cannot ...


1

They definitely exist (in Canada at least). Sample "big box" listing for "abs 1 1/4" : https://www.rona.ca/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/RonaAjaxCatalogSearchView?catalogId=10051&searchKey=RonaEN&urlLangId=-1&content=&langId=-1&keywords=abs+1%22+1%2F4&storeId=10151


1

My experiance in the UK is that compression waste pipe fittings are pretty tolerant about pipe sizes. For example a "40mm" compression fitting will clamp down on a pipe that is anywhere from about 40mm to 43mm in diameter. I don't know if compression fittings sold in other countries are similar or not.


1

You could try opening the crack slightly with a screwdriver and putting ABS glue on the crack. If it's ABS it will be weldable with the same glue that is used for black plastic drain pipe. You can test it by putting a small dot of glue on the plastic and see if it starts to soften and become sticky. I have used a similar repair on the ABS case of a hand-...


1

With your inlet line cracked it might be possible to repair depending on how much of that inlet line exists. as an FYI fro a better route: If you purchased that thing via HD or Lo - take it back for an exchange - they generally will do it. even if you are outside of 30 days. Damaged in shipping file a damage claim with the carrier. Now on to the answer if ...


1

Loosen with a pick or mattock, move with a shovel, and be very careful of that gas line. Find the sewer line first from the side the gas line is not supposed to be on. 2 feet deep is easy. If things are frozen now (I don't know where you are, since you didn't say) it will be more difficult to dig, but it can be done if needed. Otherwise wait for spring. I'...


1

At the guidance of a employee at a local hardware store I tried a 1 1/2 ABS to 1 1/4 Copper adapter. The dimensions of that adapter were different then just a regular 1 1/4 to 1 1/2 adapter (which I previously tried). So even though the pipe was measured at 1 3/8, the copper adapter fit near perfectly. Better when tightened of course. After running water ...


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