21

Re-wire the outlet so the top one is on the switch instead of the bottom one. Is this even possible, and if so, considering I've never done it before and it's under the kitchen sink without much room, how hard would this be? This should be very straightforward. There are actually two different configurations possible. Find the one or two breakers and turn ...


11

There are no requirements in National Electrical Code (NEC) that a residential disposal must be GFCI protected. However, there may be requirements in the installation instructions, which would make GFCI protection required. 210.8(A) requires receptacles serving the kitchen countertop to be GFCI protected. It also requires GFCI protection for receptacles ...


10

Dishwashers can be either hardwired, or cord-and-plug connected. Check the owners manual of the unit you have, but in most cases the decision is left to the installer. From a random Maytag Dishwasher Installation Guide (PDF) In newer homes you'll commonly find a 125V NEMA 5-15R receptacle supplied by a 20 ampere circuit, used to supply a dishwasher and ...


10

Usually there is a switch before the disposal. You push a button, or flip a switch to turn on the disposal. Did you turn the switch on? If this is the case, then this was not the best option for this installation. As well as the undercounter heater may require a dedicated circuit.


10

Replace that 4 way junction with two wyes offset from each other (you might drop the disposal trap a few inches to achieve this) and extend the aav arm as high as possible. The pressure from the disposal may be forcing the aav shut, and between the poor configuration of the hub and the resultant lack of venting the opposite sink is the path of least ...


9

Get rid of that double trap setup and that PVC tee monster. Configure a single p-trap to a waste ell on the vertical waste pipe coming out of the floor. A baffle tee goes to the top of the trap with the garbage disposer dumping into the top of it and the other sink plumbed into the side port of the baffle tee. Do not use any of that flexible accordion type ...


8

Are you positive you plugged the disposal into the exact same outlet? Often only one of the two outlets on a duplex plug under the sink is wired to the disposal. You might have plugged it into a plug that is always on, which would explain the spark when plugging it in


7

The manual for the garbage disposal I just installed says to use cold water because hot water could cause the motor to overheat.


7

Assuming that food waste disposers will include more grease going down the drain due to the variety of items being disposed, I've been told that cold water helps coagulate grease into chunks that wash down the drain. Somehow this helps reduce grease buildup in the trap. I would suspect that cold+liquid grease at the disposal gets broken up without gumming up ...


7

The drain into the wall needs to be below that of the disposal and sink, there's no way to beat gravity with this. Your options are to: Raise the disposal output (with a different disposal) Raise the sink (with a different, shallower sink, or at least a shallow drain for the disposal) Lower the drain at the wall


7

Remove cabinet door. Fix leak. Remove particle board and put a box fan blowing into the cabinet for at least 24 hours. Treat the floor under there with a mold killing cleaning spray. Put the fan back while you cut the new bottom. I would do it piecemeal before removing the face of the cabinet. Which you may have to because removing the face of a corner ...


7

What you have there is a single pole switch that has been tapped to continue the permanent hot to another source. Perhaps an outlet or dishwasher. If you are installing a new dishwasher it will probably have significantly more amps. This could become an issue with the old practice of putting the disposal and dishwasher on the same circuit.


7

Et voila. This is what you should aim for, but where I drew the red circle you'll replace the wall tube with another tee that goes up to the vent and down to the drain. Turn the disposal around as pictured here. Use drain tube just as pictured here rather than gluing anything then it's easy to align everything and you don't need a cleanout.


6

Dishwashers usually have a built in food disposer, so having one is not required. I also suggest just replacing the existing disposer instead of removing it altogether. Cheapest ones cost around $60 and since they usually feature a quick change mechanism, the whole process takes 15 minutes. But if you remove one, then you will have to reroute a drain pipe ...


5

Based on your description, I don't think the problem is a jam. More likely the windings in the motor are bad or there is a bad contact in the motor. Because of the design of most domestic garbage disposals, you can't open the motor housing to fix these problems. Therefore your only option is to replace it.


5

Swamp gas is pretty close actually. Most disposers have quite the bacteria culture growing inside it's mechanism. What you are seeing and smelling is an aerosolized portion of this culture ejected from the disposer by the spinning action. It can't go down the drain because it is blocked by the water in the trap. It doesn't normally come up through the ...


5

The round hole/port where the conduit fitting is located is actually a threaded port. If you unscrew the locking nut on the fitting, you will then be able to unscrew the threaded conduit fitting from the threaded port. Threaded port: Seal-tite conduit connector:


5

Your best bet would be to rewire the outlet. It's an easy job. the hardest part is getting into position and cleaning out under the sink. Find the two breakers in your main panel that feed the dishwasher and disposal and turn them off. Remove the cover plate and then the screws that attach the outlet to the box. Pull out the outlet and locate the brass ...


5

That should be a slip fit and simply pull out. It's possible that some prior worker glued the joint between 1&2 with 3 inserted, and it got stuck that way. It's also possible that it's merely stuck with years of crud. In either case, it should pull out, twisting it while pulling may help to break whatever is sticking it loose, and if it just won't go you ...


5

Apologies for the mickey mouse sketches. There are lots of CAD gurus here who would rightly shame me for this .... but anyway .... top is what I believe @JimmyFix-it intends. I think it's the better suggestion. Bottom is roughly what I've suggested. Shaded in the top diagram, two baffle tees, and in the bottom, two wyes offset vertically. Yes there's ...


4

You incorrectly wired the switch into this device. What you've created is an always on device and a short in the middle of the circuit: Black --------+-----------+ | | line switch disposal | | White --------+-----------+ In this scenario, when the switch is flipped, ...


4

One advantage of using a dishwasher in conjunction with a garbage disposer is that the drain hose of the washer goes directly into the upper section of the disposer. This provides the needed isolation between the washer drain hose and the sink drain trap. This isolation prevents back flow from the drain back into the dish washer. Without a disposer present ...


4

It would be up to you to decide the value of your hand. I rather enjoy having my hands, so I use a stick when needed. Never felt the need to buy a specialized tool. Sometimes what's jamming the garbage disposal is, itself, sharp - a tin can lid or glass object, for instance. Naturally, those things are not supposed to be in there, but it does not mean they ...


4

I have had several houses with a dishwasher but not a garbage disposal. I don't think it really changes the installation that much... the dishwasher waste pipe connects to the sink drain before the trap. If you want to plumb the dishwasher somewhere there isn't a sink already, you need to install a trap & standpipe, similar to the way a washing machine ...


4

I wouldn't rely on the old flange. While the flange itself might be fine, there's plumber's putty between it and the sink. That stuff doesn't last forever, and if you knock it loose replacing the disposal, you'll wind up pulling it off and adding it anyways. The good thing is it's not crazy hard to get off or put the new one on. The dishwasher compression ...


4

Depending upon the location of the kitchen sink with the garbage disposal, you could re-pipe the drain to a dump tank with a "macerator pump" or sewage pump. This would reduce the garbage disposal stuff to an almost liquid state, thus reducing the chance for a clog further down the drain. Our worst waste product that always plugged our drains were lettuce ...


4

You should not run NM sheathed cable through a cabinet that has doors which open to allow storage. You should be installing grounded receptacles and using appliance connector cords.


4

I'll try to answer your questions as stated. Minimum height difference I'm not sure if there is a code for this, but it's good practice to have the bottom of the disposal drain higher than the top of the drain into the wall. So a height difference of at least one pipe-width. But, as long as the bottom of your tailpiece is higher than the wall drain, the ...


4

I think the acid in the Naval Jelly might corrode through the basin, I think it's some metal that really doesn't tolerate corrosives such as drain opener AT ALL and makes a huge caustic mess if you try it. Ask me how I know this. With the power off, just try to get it moving with the garbage disposal wrench, which is just a 1/4" hex key with an offset ...


3

As you've noticed, your disposal will always be full of water because the outlet is lower than the trap weir. A trap is measured from the top of the trap bend, to the trap weir. This depth should be between 2 - 4" (according to plumbing codes), to maintain a proper trap. You'll notice that your trap depth is much more than that, and includes your ...


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