10

Dishwashers can be either hardwired, or cord-and-plug connected. Check the owners manual of the unit you have, but in most cases the decision is left to the installer. From a random Maytag Dishwasher Installation Guide (PDF) In newer homes you'll commonly find a 125V NEMA 5-15R receptacle supplied by a 20 ampere circuit, used to supply a dishwasher ...


10

There are no requirements in National Electrical Code (NEC) that a residential disposal must be GFCI protected. However, there may be requirements in the installation instructions, which would make GFCI protection required. 210.8(A) requires receptacles serving the kitchen countertop to be GFCI protected. It also requires GFCI protection for receptacles ...


10

Usually there is a switch before the disposal. You push a button, or flip a switch to turn on the disposal. Did you turn the switch on? If this is the case, then this was not the best option for this installation. As well as the undercounter heater may require a dedicated circuit.


9

The small bowl is typically called a veggie bowl. The idea is that you use the large sink for cleaning dishes or soaking and then the other sink is available for prep usage, peeling etc. So, the disposal would go on the small bowl.


7

I've always seen the garbage disposal installed on the smaller bowl. I'm not aware of any official convention or rule that says which side should be used, that's just what I've noticed.


7

Sounds like the chewed up gunk from the disposal has largely blocked the drain pipe. Try a plunger first (block all other connected drains) but that may or may not be effective depending on how far along the clog is. If the simple solution doesn't work, you'll have to open a clean-out (or the U-trap) and use an auger to break it out. You can rent a "snake"...


7

Sounds like the drain after the disposal and connection to the other sink is partially blocked. I'd start with a drain cleaner that's designed for a partial blockage. In the kitchen, it's likely a buildup from cooking oils and grease that got into the drain. If that doesn't work, then you can remove the trap under your sink and remove as much crud from it as ...


7

If you want to have power always on to a box that is downstream of a switch, you'll need to use 3-conductor cable between the switch and split the hot side of the outlet. At the outlet, break off the tab on the hot side only between the top and bottom outlet. Wire the red conductor to one of the hot screws, the black conductor to the other one, and then ...


7

A GFCI is a good idea because of the location of the outlet. However, I don't think that a GFCI that can simultaneously protect two circuits even exists (and I doubt one would fit into a single-gang box if it did exist), so I believe you have a couple of options: Install GFCI breakers on the dishwasher and disposal circuits, and use a regular outlet under ...


7

A garage will frequently have fire rated drywall, a vapor barrier, and insulation. The fire rated drywall prevents fires in the garage from roasting your home before the fire dept can get there (1 hour). The vapor barrier prevents exhaust fumes (CO) from getting into your home from any cars. And the insulation is because the garage is an unheated space. I'm ...


7

The drain into the wall needs to be below that of the disposal and sink, there's no way to beat gravity with this. Your options are to: Raise the disposal output (with a different disposal) Raise the sink (with a different, shallower sink, or at least a shallow drain for the disposal) Lower the drain at the wall


7

Assuming that food waste disposers will include more grease going down the drain due to the variety of items being disposed, I've been told that cold water helps coagulate grease into chunks that wash down the drain. Somehow this helps reduce grease buildup in the trap. I would suspect that cold+liquid grease at the disposal gets broken up without gumming up ...


7

The manual for the garbage disposal I just installed says to use cold water because hot water could cause the motor to overheat.


7

What you have there is a single pole switch that has been tapped to continue the permanent hot to another source. Perhaps an outlet or dishwasher. If you are installing a new dishwasher it will probably have significantly more amps. This could become an issue with the old practice of putting the disposal and dishwasher on the same circuit.


6

This project is fairly straight forward. You need to completely disassemble both sides including the in sink trims. You will need an adjustable wrench, a large pair of pump pliers or monkey wrench, screwdriver, nothing special. Be sure the electrical wire will reach the new disposal location, it not, you will need a j-box and some wire, you will also need ...


6

I only have 2005 NEC handy, but there's nothing there against using same circuit for both dishwasher and disposal. 210.23(A) Branch circuits, rated 20 or 15 amperes may feed lighting units, utilization equipment or combination of both. The rating of of any one cord and plug connected utilization equipment shall not exceed 80% of the branch circuit ampere ...


6

The receptacle that the disposal is plugged into is fed from the Load side of the GFCI receptacle, thereby providing ground fault protection to the receptacle. There is a ground fault somewhere between the GFCI and the disposal, which is causing the GFCI to do it's job and trip. You'll have to locate the fault, and fix it. If you don't have (or know how to ...


5

It is obvious to me that the main sewer line is restricted somewhere between the house and town line. In areas that allow storm drains to be coupled to sewer lines, it is important that these lines run freely. If yours is backing up with kitchen waste, there is only one solution. You need to have the line checked with a camera. you could have a simple ...


5

Dishwashers usually have a built in food disposer, so having one is not required. I also suggest just replacing the existing disposer instead of removing it altogether. Cheapest ones cost around $60 and since they usually feature a quick change mechanism, the whole process takes 15 minutes. But if you remove one, then you will have to reroute a drain pipe ...


5

Based on your description, I don't think the problem is a jam. More likely the windings in the motor are bad or there is a bad contact in the motor. Because of the design of most domestic garbage disposals, you can't open the motor housing to fix these problems. Therefore your only option is to replace it.


5

Swamp gas is pretty close actually. Most disposers have quite the bacteria culture growing inside it's mechanism. What you are seeing and smelling is an aerosolized portion of this culture ejected from the disposer by the spinning action. It can't go down the drain because it is blocked by the water in the trap. It doesn't normally come up through the ...


5

Remove cabinet door. Fix leak. Remove particle board and put a box fan blowing into the cabinet for at least 24 hours. Treat the floor under there with a mold killing cleaning spray. Put the fan back while you cut the new bottom. I would do it piecemeal before removing the face of the cabinet. Which you may have to because removing the face of a corner ...


5

The round hole/port where the conduit fitting is located is actually a threaded port. If you unscrew the locking nut on the fitting, you will then be able to unscrew the threaded conduit fitting from the threaded port. Threaded port: Seal-tite conduit connector:


4

Your new disposal should be connected to a switched GFCI outlet. Verify that the outlet is not tripped. Using an outlet tester, verify that the switch properly powers the electrical socket. Many disposals have an integrated breaker. Locate this switch and verify that the disposal itself has not tripped. You could also try plugging the disposal into an ...


4

I always install into the smaller bowl. (experienced but non-professional opinion) If you think about it, the only thing that would prevent access to the disposal is a sink full of water. I'd rather have the larger bowl available to fill up with water and still allow access to the disposal. If the user wants one bowl of water and still use the disposal, it ...


4

If it's coming out of the motor casing, the seal under the shredder plate has failed. The whole unit needs to be replaced. Repair is pointless as the garbage disposal will have other corrosion issues. From Photo It's coming from the trap joints. There's a square cut rubber gasket under that screw collar that's probably hardened, cracked and is the source of ...


4

Pretty good advice so far. If it were a new install, then it would not be "J" boxed under the sink, but direct to the switch and GFI protected. But with the situation you have now, unless you want to fish wires up the wall to the switch, let's make it safe. Install a tamper proof GFI receptacle into the box as pictured and install a gasketed cover. ...


4

If you don't have the GFCI tester that KeithS mentioned, they are cheap and good to have. But until then, just hit the test button on the GFCI outlet in the kitchen and see what turns off. As far as wiring coming straight out of the box like that, I suspect it's against code. Every wire should go through a knockout in the back of the outlet in a secure ...


4

The answer to your question depends completely on whether this node in the circuit is GFCI-protected. GFCI protection is an absolute must for your disposer; it's a high-amperage electric motor hooked up to your kitchen drain. Since this J-box doesn't have a standard 3-prong outlet, you'll need to find another outlet on the same circuit; look for a ...


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