5

This appears to be very shoddy workmanship. I can't tell a lot about how plumb the walls may or may not be but the wallboard has to be done properly in order to get good results once the tile is applied. However, it doesn't appear the tiler is very knowledgeable or skilled with properly installing tile. He/she should be using spacers between all of those ...


3

Washerless faucets are known to have this problem. When the pressure drops the weight of the handle can pull the valve on. Opening the valve and making the springs tighter has worked for some. Heavier springs are required in the worst cases. I believe we had 1 person that had it fixed until they opened the garden hose (large flow). Increasing the pressure ...


3

Since the floor is needing to be replaced with plywood to get a good base, I would remove the rest of the existing subfloor and plane down the high spot, if it is truly high. Over time. joists will develop a sag in the middle, so where though it may be truly high in the area you suggest, it may actually be level with the rest of the floor at bearing walls. ...


3

The pressure may be slightly reduced while in use. Most homes have at least 1/2” plumbing and the sink cartridges usually have ~1/8” orifices in the faucet on each side so if you turn all 4 on at the same time you probably will notice a difference but not a significant one. Now a tub faucet that would be a different answer.


3

I don’t see any problem, with multiple changes I believe it is a better way to go. Even using an electric blower to move cellulose when I pulled it down there was still a mess. The others we did were overlays. In a bathroom is 1 place I suggest using hot mud or setting compound for those new to Sheetrock. Hot mud is affected less by moisture than standard ...


3

A couple of options 1 Look for metal legs for example these (perhaps too ornate) ones 2 a pair of legs made custom for those large square holes near the front. Either way add basin brackets with spacers at A plus adhesive at B. You need front legs. People will lean or even sit on it.


2

I am trying to figure out if this pipe is the vent from the main drain. It is a vent, it is coming off of the top of a sanitary tee so it is a vent for a fixture (Bathroom sink) that would be attached to the SanTee. The pipe coming form the bottom of the SanTee is the drain for a fixture that would be attached to it. The hole in the floor should be the ...


2

i see no problems other than the new fan may have some tabs that fold out to install it above the drywall and with 2 layers, they may not work right. add some blocking and prepare to drill your own install holes in the metal housing of the fan........Maybe :)


2

You should be able to turn that brass colored knob counterclockwise and remove it from the stem or have the stem turn too and remove it from the diverter plate which should then drop out of the spout. Then examine it for any signs of corrosion or cracking. If damaged, a trip to a plumbing supply store might just do the trick for a replacement. You have to ...


2

Removing wall paper can be a major pain in the posterior at best. With plaster on top it may be a nightmare, if doable. You could try it in a small test area. It may be? easier and or less time consuming to skim coat a new layer of mud and sand smooth, but that requires skill that a DIY'er may not have (but with practice could do). Maybe remove the dry ...


2

What is missing on this setup is the compression nut. It should fit over your 1 1/2 inch drain pipe going into the wall stub. When you tighten it down the inner gasket will seal around the drain and prevent water and odor from escaping into the room. This looks like a poor diy job. The problem may have been that the bend in the drain pipe before the Marvel ...


2

You can share GFCI receptacles. You might have to. OK. Here's a science fact you do not know, and neither do the people who wrote that instruction. A GFCI is not a receptacle. It is a system of protection that can protect any number of outlets. In fact they make GFCIs that are not receptacles - GFCI only, or GFCI+breaker, or GFCI+switch. Anyway, every ...


1

Looks like 1/4 inch soft copper. Uninstall the faucet and take it out of the counter so you can get a better look and work easily. Looks like the original fitting was braised on with a torch so you can re use it. Get a torch and plumber's solder as well as sandpaper and flux. Use a hacksaw or plumbing pipe cutter to carefully cut the pipe off where it is ...


1

It's an easy fix. There should be a compression washer and nut on that slip joint. It's hard to see but it looks like the drain tube is small for that fitting and will require a suitable washer or an adapter. And it looks like the trap is too close for the compression nut to fit properly so you may need to turn it 90 degrees towards the front of the ...


1

The gap on the door frame is fine. It's also necessary for adhesion. Say there is humid weather, and the wood door frame expands by 0.5 mm. That will squish the caulk joint in the gap a bit, but it is wide enough to accomodate this. Same thing if the wood shrinks due to a dry summer, or flexes when someone closes the door. If it was a 1mm gap there would be ...


1

Without something for scale it's hard to tell but it looks about right based on the gaps between other tiles. It's a good call to use caulking on the gaps between the wall and the tile as it allows for some movement. If you were to use the grout it would likely crack at some point.


1

The small duct will not make your fan "useless". However, the fan will not perform to its published air handling or noise specifications. Further, its lifetime may (or may not) be diminished and its warranty might be voided. Buy from a seller with a liberal return policy, try it, and return if you are not satisfied with the result. Another ...


1

Given the amount you want to raise the floor I'd suggest 2x1" planks screwed to each joist (+0.75") with the 3/4" on top of that (+0.75"). You should then put a sheet of 1/4" ply on top. This way if you ever need to remove the tiles / ditra you only need to tear up the 1/4" ply and can leave the 3/4" floor intact. Also, ...


1

Looks like a Price Pfister (or import copy thereof). Looks like a good quality faucet that is worth saving. Note- you don't necessarily need to buy new "cartridges", these are totally rebuild-able unless physically damaged. The washers and o-rings should be readily available at a good hardware shop or plumbing shop (maybe not at big-box center). ...


1

If you can’t get the tail out of the basin pop up /drain stopper you may need to replace the entire drain assembly. Don’t panic only about 12.00$ at the big orange home store “pop up assembly” by easy flow is one inexpensive one that will work. First remove the drain pop up lever unscrew the plastic and pull the rod out the back. the rod is held in place by ...


1

I believe you are describing hollow wall anchors. Molly screw is a common brand name that has come to be reference for almost any hollow wall anchor. I think you have half the removal process. You need to install a screw then gently tap it with a hammer. This will straighten out the insert allowing it to come out thru a hole slightly larger than the ...


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