6

Most toilets have the cistern attached to the bowl so there's no pipe needed. This particular type has the cistern separated from the bowl so that pipe feeds water into the top of the bowl from the cistern to start the flush. You'll find a supply line that feeds the cistern around there.


6

Your installation (as it was) needed 3 hots and 1 neutral. I suspect the original installer didn't want to bother sourcing /4 cable or using smurf tube, so simply doubled up two /2 cables and called it a day. As such, one of the whites is being used as a hot. "Misused", probably. NEC is not as clear on this point as I would like. If you don't ...


3

I would not trust the presence of one stop valve. This is a perfect time to turn off the house water at the main shutoff (usually near where the water line enters), unscrew and remove any bathroom faucet and kitchen sink aerators, and open the faucets at the furthest point in the home (upstairs bath, perhaps) and elsewhere in the house to drain the lines ...


3

If I understand your question, you have power coming from the light junction box and from there it goes to the switch box with 14/2 wire as a switch loop. What you need is supply power, neutral, and two switched hots going back to the light/fan. Rather than remove the 14/2, leave it in place with the black wire carrying the line voltage and white being ...


2

Ok, first you need to figure out which cable is for the heater. You have two individual circuits going from your switch box to the fan enclosure. Each circuit has a hot (black), neutral (white) and ground (bare). You'll need a voltage sensor or meter to determine this. It's important you put the heater back on it's original circuit because it's probably a ...


2

Simple technical reason - every house/bathroom ceiling has a different height. To make cubicles that accommodate most customers, they make panels that are roughly 2m tall and connect them to wall or ceiling using adjustable length bar. Since main purpose of cubicle is to prevent water splashes over rest of the room (or obscure the users), open top doesn't ...


2

The strip falling off looks like rubber. A U shaped rubber gasket that maybe split and is coming apart on both sides. If the glass is resting on the tub and this was supporting its weight you need to remove the door and replace the gasket. If the wall brackets are supporting all the weight there should be a gap between the tub and the glass that you can fill ...


2

Yes, I can tell you plain: It is silicone. And silicone is what you want. Not the fancy expensive silicone. You want the cheap stuff for the following reasons: Silicone does leave a sticky surface which will allow dirt to adhere to it. Silicone does not allow any water penetration at all which keeps mold from growing on it. Clear silicone dries very clear. ...


1

Put the stopper in and fill the tub. Check the stopper is actually watertight. If it leaks, then the leak is above the stopper. If it leaks only when water reaches the overflow, then it's the overflow. Otherwise, it's the joint around the drain hole on the inside of the tub (red arrow). If it doesn't leak with the stopper in, but leaks when the drain is ...


1

In the end I've managed to unstick it from the wall with brute force, the whole head shower arm was just placed on the top of the pipe and the silicon was the only thing holding it back. Although you can see that it can screw inside of the pipe, this was not the case.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible