21

I'm not sure where some of those cracks came from, but it doesn't look like anything a good quality bathroom caulk won't fix. Here is the big secret to caulking anything in the bathroom: Clean those surfaces as good as you possibly can. Like cleaner than you've ever cleaned anything in a bathroom. After its super clean, clean it again with alcohol to ...


8

I have had and solved this problem. There are three wood dowels on each side between those cam lock screws. You must cut them. When you do, you will be able to tilt the side piece in order to extract the screws. I did not feel like getting out my multittool for such a small job, so I used a sharp bread knife. The dowels are not even 1/4" so you will have no ...


5

You can fix this, potentially fairly, easily. Get some Silicone caulk from your choice of hardware store. Then read the directions which will probably say something like clean the area to be applied and apply a bead of caulk. Here is the potentially part: depending on how long the crack has been there and what material was used there could be water damage/...


4

Several people have mentioned "silicone caulk" - there is a little more that can be added to that recommendation that can make a major difference. Silicone rubbers designed for "wet area use" typically have a 20+ year lifetime, retain their flexibility and bond well to many surfaces. For bathroom use or anywhere that cosmetic appearance matters, use an SR (...


4

NuTone likely doesn't have anything to do with this. That is a newer NuTone fan cover that has been drilled to fit over the center post on what is a very old vent fan. That vent fan used to have a round cover that likely broke at some point. That whole unit needs to be replaced. The fan and housing look over 50 years old - there's just no point in trying ...


3

Usually those shelves are mounted to the wall structure behind the tiles, most often into one or two studs. You need to find the studs and then drill into them for proper support. While you should get the contractor back to sort poor work, I would hesitate as they may not know any better... Often those shelves are mounted first then the tiles are cut to ...


3

I cannot imagine how any "glue" that would hold those. But then again, you may want to inquire your local big box or hardware store and ask. Gluing right directly to polished to polished ceramic / porcelain tiles doesn't seem feasible as a practice. I would imagine if that there WAS a way to glue these like this, the surface to surface would have to be ...


3

Honestly, this is something you'll deal with periodically anywhere you have a caulked joint. I caulked my son's bathroom about 18 months ago and some of the caulk is starting to break down from regular use. You can use a basic latex caulk, but they just don't last as long. A couple of things to consider Pure silicone. It's a MAJOR pain to remove, smells ...


3

In a word no. First issue is you are renting. The owner has specified no holes in the tile. There is no guarantee the adhesive, if it held won't damage the tile when the cabinet is removed. I would suggest getting some sort of a base cabinet, perhaps a bookcase size piece and mount the mirror cabinet to the top .


3

What you have purchased is a new shower valve that also comes with the "trim", a shower head and a tub spout. Together, this is all commonly sold as a kit. These are made for installing a new shower or a "down to the studs" remodel where you are going to cut the plumbing in the wall to remove the old shower valve and install a new one. If this is what you ...


2

When you turn that style of Moen control, it mixes hot water with cold to adjust the temperature; but first you need to pull out to get the water to flow...


2

I believe you are talking about the p trap or U bend. The old metal drain lines do wear out because of acids in food, I know many years back I bought a place that looked good but the chrome plating was all that was left on some of the pipe it developed a small leak when I went to pull it it crumbled like an eggshell. Most of the modern drain cleaners won’t ...


2

At least they used chrome, if the tube went into the drain there could be reverse migration if the drain was slow the separation is a requirement for food processing chillers to prevent back flow. This is probably a safety for a boiler or the piping.


2

I think that you should focus on the cause not the symptom. So, what causes the toilet to overflow? Is it a filling valve issue? have you checked? Is the drain partially blocked? Once you sort that then the floor should be fine.


2

Nope, because it's a receptacle in a bathroom Any receptacle you add in any bathroom must be on a circuit that follows one of these rules. The circuit serves ONLY bathroom receptacles, and nothing else - no receptacles outside bathrooms, no fixed loads of any kind. These bathroom receptacles can be in any number of bathrooms. The circuit serves ONLY ...


1

That's a pretty old unit. Based on the (apparent) metal blades, the color of the motor housing, and the design of the mount, I'd guess it's at least 30-40 years old. I can't find the model number on any old resources for NuTone models. To be honest, I'm not sure you're going to find anything online to help with anything that old. Your best bet would be ...


1

You should be able to put in a normal receptacle or other device there. Assuming this is inside a bathroom, it will need to either include a GFCI here or earlier in the circuit (e.g., GFCI breaker). Since the black and white are in pairs, something else is powered after this on the same circuit, so best practice is to add pigtails to the existing black & ...


1

Why would a GFI blink red Red Status Blinking = Initial self-test upon first power up Solid or blinking = Press TEST and RESET buttons to reset GFCI If GFCI will not reset OR solid or blinking red continues, replace device


1

Is it a crack or a seam where the tub base joined to the side-walls? If it's the latter, most likely there is a 'lip' attached to the tub wall, extending up about a 1/2' from tub acting as a 'dam', designed to keep water, running down the shower walls, from seeping behind it. You might be in better shape than you think


1

Ever wonder how an acoustic guitar can be so loud even though it has only thin vibrating strings? It's the box. Similarly, the housing and exit duct of a fan are the culprits with a fan. The vibrations are in effect amplified by this apparatus. Even if one installs material to dampen the transfer of vibrations to it, they still get transferred quite ...


1

Honestly? The easiest fix is to replace the whole towel rail, at your own cost. The only tools you'll need is a large Phillips screwdriver, and perhaps some cleaning products for the wall. The only critical measurement is the overall length. So take the old one off the wall, and go visit a hardware store. The US has Lowes or Home Depot or Walmart or ...


1

I normally put it on the left side (public toilet), due to the fact that the majority uses the right hand to do the wiping and cleaning. I feel much safer to pull the tissue using my left hand and to pass it to my right to do the action. I hope it make sense.


1

That 6’ run cannot be horizontal - it needs to slope, so either the wall end has to drop or the toilet end needs to be higher. Your locality will specify the amount of slope in the regulations, however, some I have seen have a drop of about 6” across that distance. If the slope is too shallow, then things get stuck...


1

Showers don't have to be open. I've seen and worked on many that had walls to the ceiling. I had a customer who had an open shower and inquired about closing it in because they had a breathing problem and wanted to breathe the steam. I enclosed it by adding two pieces of plexiglass mounted on top of the rails for the shower door and wall up to the ceiling.


1

It looks like mold / mildew yes it can be killed with a bleach & water solution or a hydrogen peroxide and water mixture. Is it the “bad stuff” only testing will reveal that but to tell the truth that doesn’t look that bad. But killing it and keeping the area dry, making sure the vent fan is on when using the shower / bath will help get the moisture out ...


1

Looks like a clogged aerator. Unscrew it and flush it out with water. Use a pliers and wrap the aerator in a cloth as to not scratch the finish.


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