49

This is exactly the purpose of a basin wrench Here's a picture from familyhandyman.com that shows a basin wrench in action: Note that as mentioned in another answer, you usually don't need to remove the faucet to replace the washers; but if you do need to remove the faucet for whatever reason - this is the tool.


35

Maybe I'm missing something here but why are you trying to take off those nuts? The washers for the valves are topside. You just have to remove the valve stems to expose and change the washers. If you wanted to replace the faucet, then you'd need to get these nuts off.


5

A crowfoot wrench might do it, if you can find one that's the right size to fit those nuts. Another option (much more work) is to disconnect the pipes lower down (where they join the hard lines), disconnect the drain, and pull up the whole sink.


5

I usually remove both of the supply pipes then make a socket to fit from a suitable sized metal pipe. Even found a copper pipe hammered on was sufficient in some cases.


4

The danger of connecting the green wire to a ground that doesn't go all the way back to the panel is that if the fan has a ground fault, the ground wire will not carry the fault back to the safety of the panel, and instead will distribute the ground fault to everywhere on that island of grounds. So all the grounds will suddenly become hot. I would leave ...


2

Check the sump where the pump is located. It's likely getting a trickle of water from somewhere, filling very slowly until it trips the float switch and pumps the water out. You may have a leaky stool, water seepage from under the floor, a dripping faucet, a de/humidifier, or condensing furnace draining into it. Your next steps, if any, depend on where ...


2

I worked as an electrician for a few years. Normally it depends on the light fixture you are mounting. The reason why we just stub a wire out is vanity placement. Sometimes we cant get a box mounted in for a few reasons. Plumbing vent stacks, stud placement, and round cut in boxes(old work) will show around the fixture. If the builder placed a nailer for a ...


2

Just go to your home store or a plumbing supply store for a greater selection, and pick up the right size pipe nipple. They come in many standard sizes and can even be custom made at some store. Good luck.


1

Alternatives: Remove screws and fully dry the holes and tiles there. Then back fill the holes with a colored epoxy that color matches close to the tile. Back fill the holes with a tile grout material of color similar to the tile color. Break or cut out the tile with the holes and replace with one of the spare left over tiles from the original installation ...


1

It is moldy and your best bet would be to remove the glass and re-install it as if it were new. Remove all the caulk, rubber seal and clean the bottom and sides of the glass frame. Scrape all surfaces with a single edge blade to remove any film and then clean with vinegar to kill off any remaining mold. Let the surfaces totally dry. Put a bead of quality ...


1

Whether you do double or triple pane windows you're still going to have a chill coming off that bathroom window when it's cold out. The key, especially for the bathroom is to install an energy efficient window covering. You need to look at R values. For example, a wall has an R value of about 19. A good window with a U value of .20 has an R factor of about 5....


1

You should be looking at the window's U-Factor. (Lower is better.) In New York, windows below 0.25 are recommended by Energy Star, and you can get windows going all the way down to 0.20 and below.


1

A triple-pane is not necessarily a better insulator than a double-pane. You need to check the specific ratings of the windows you are considering. In general, yes, you would expect triple to outperform double but that cannot be applied to all windows.


1

Yes, the Code requires an exhaust vent capable of a minimum for 150 cfm. (See M1507.3 and Table M1507.3) The duct shall be metal and extend to the exterior. If the exhaust fan exceed 400 cfm, then makeup air is required. (See IMC Chapter 5)


1

I agree that it's probably not the P trap. It's pretty common for condo/apartments to share main drains. Has your neighbor had problems too? Liquid drain cleaners will work for only so long and then usually an auger or snake is needed. You can pick up a inexpensive snake at your home store and try that out. It could definitely solve your problem. If not, ...


1

Take a piece of corner tile and seal it to the top of your ledge so it overhangs your removable cement board. See picture below. They come in all sorts of lengths. Tile your removable cement board and fit it up under the corner overhang. Think about taking a 2" strip of cement board and screwing it to the framing in contact with the floor and wall so you ...


1

I will do it in this order trying to move forward and no backward Demo Installing subfloor Installing tile Replacing bathtub Install roof vent Replacing drywall on walls (possibly on the ceiling too) Replacing vanity and sink fixtures Replacing toilet Painting Replacing lighting fixtures


1

At this point you really should do it right. Since this is the basement floor, you will be placing the shower pan on the concrete. You'll want to adjust the drain so that it can connect correctly to the shower drain. If this concrete is already sloped (and it sounds as though it may be) you may be able to remove the sloped part if it was poured on top of ...


1

You can put backer board on top of this flange and then set the tile to overlap the flange and sit down snugly on the tub, sometimes having to bevel the back side of the bottom edge of these bottom tile with a diamond blade on a 4.5” angle grinder. But, make sure that the combined thickness of the backer board and tile will get you out far enough to achieve ...


1

the thin cap in front of the gold knob should thread off counter clockwise...this could be very difficult to remove ...use thin rubber gloves for better grip....elastics on the cap too will help … if that fails you can get a strap wrench at plumbing supplies store.


1

Check out Saniflo up flush toilets; they're great for basements above/below grade. You can have a sink/shower/toilet that all drains to a pump/macerator unit either behind the toilet or in the vanity cabinet. Outlet pipes are usually 3/4" or 1" PVC that can be pumped up as high as 20 ft in order to reach most of your smaller drain lines, which are usually ...


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