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The only real issue is rattling noise due to vibration, or creaking due to thermal expansion. In this case, since one pipe is plastic, it's probably not a concern. I'd try to lighten the tension between them by flexing the plastic a bit, or place a rag between to act as a silencer. Be sure that by doing so you don't create a tight spot against the lumber, ...


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For over a year, this "unanswered" question has had an answer and acceptance in the comments: Looks like push-to-release connectors. So try pushing and removing the wire at same time.... at worst you can cut the wires as next as you can to the box and rewire the new outlet. – DDS May 19 '18 at 9:22 Turns out they were push to release connectors. ...


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Most natural stone won't cantilever that far without breaking. Even a synthetic like corian may or may not work. There's probably a narrow ledger (~1x2) supporting the back.


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For the most part there are only a few manufacturers of those fan motors, regardless of what brand the fan is. Most of them are interchangeable, but the critical dimension that you often must deal with is the length of the shaft that the fan itself is attached to (and how it attaches). You will need to remove it to determine what you need. What I have found ...


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Main problem Plexiglass and lexan are different from glass: They are much more flexible for a given thickness. They scratch very easily. They don't break casually. Of the two, lexan is tougher form. Because of the greater flexibility, you probably don't want to use the "minimalist metal" designs favoured by the glass shower door set. You probably want ...


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That's pretty much it. You'll know when you start cutting the stud nails whether there's significant pressure on the plate (the saw will move instead of the blade, and you along with it--it's a fun ride with a reciprocating saw :) ). If there is, you might use a jack to (gently) life the ceiling adjacent. Pad it well and don't punch through your drywall. ...


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There are two types of diaphragm valves that you seem to know about in your question. One type uses external pressure to hold the valve closed, but another type uses the power of water pressure to do most of the work. An example of this second type is the common irrigation valve: Click picture for video I'm not going to quote the entire video, but ...


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What is the total number of fixture units that you have on your 3" line? The clean out is not necessary, provided you can access it from the roof or another clean out is further up line. additional venting is not necessary. From viewing your photos, I would call in a professional plumber and have the repair done correctly and have someone that can be called ...


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If the grout is crumbling because there is a problem with the grout itself, (like it was mixed improperly, etc.) you won't have to "re-tile" but I'm afraid, to fix it properly, you'll need to remove the old grout and regrout the floor. Another possibility is that the original grout was not applied correctly (perhaps it wasn't fully worked into the spaces ...


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There should be NO grout there it will always crack because you have 2 dissimilar materials that shrink and expand at different rates. The proper thing to use is caulking. Even where the wall meets the floor in the shower grout will work for awhile but will eventually fail as the floor moves different from the wall. But underneath the tile should be a rubber ...


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Just caulk it. Grout will tend to crack in any change of plane, so caulk is the recommended practice. For prep, scratch out anything that's loose or protrudes past your caulk profile. You'll probably want to use white for the tub transition and a color matched caulk for the tile-to-tile corner. A typical installation is caulked at the plane change and has ...


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I'm skeptical that this damage is all coming from the hinge side of the glass door, that is unless your shower sprays directly on it. Could you confirm that as the water runs down the inside face of your shower door, and onto the bottom sweep, that it runs into your shower and down the drain? I have a feeling that if you pour water on the inside of the ...


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1) the vent in your picture is installed upside down. The vent will clearly mark which way end is the top of vent for installation purposes. 2) if you want to vent bathroom fans through the roof; use a gooseneck. The gooseneck has a flap that opens and shuts when the fan is on and then turned off. PRIMEX makes the best goosenecks in my opinion.


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