11

The best repair for this problem is to cut the trap from the drain pipe, glue on an ABS 1 1/2 inch (or same pipe diameter as existing pipe) coupling and than a short section of new pipe long enough to bring the trap under the sink tail piece. You wll have a little bit of leeway because the trap section can pivot from the threaded connection.


10

If that leg can be unscrewed and moved over 1/2 inch, that would be my first choice. If not, then I'd get a coping saw and cut the leg to fit the trim.


6

You are "f'ing" crazy if you think that raising part of your floor is easier than doing some very very minor concrete work. There are all these gotchas for raising a floor and then finishing it so it doesn't look ghetto. Now for doing it right there is breaking concrete, creating a bed for pipe, laying pipe, backfilling, and then adding in ...


4

Trimming the bottom will not create moisture issues--nearly every wall in existence has a gap at the bottom. If you're relying on drywall to handle moisture you should hang up your hammer. Trim away, and if the drywall offends thee by refusing to lie flat, pluck it out. Drywall is cheap and if it's behind tile anyway you can patch in as you see fit. Either ...


4

Those shaver sockets are actually a small transformer with 1:1 windings. That provides mains voltage in, and the same voltage out. The only difference is the output voltage is "fully floating" with absolutely no ground return or reference. You could accidentally touch the voltage and the faucet with no current flow. The only way to get a shock ...


3

With a 9’ ceiling you can do what you want without cutting the slab. The only negative is there will be a step into the bathroom (not a horrible thing I have had to do this for a 1/2 bath because the drain itself was directly below the slab on 1 house. I would be aware if there are roughed in showers, those traps will be below the concrete normally and you ...


3

I have renewed dozens of these fans for customers when they start getting noisy or just plain stop. Almost all of these motors are shaded pole motors with super cheap “oil light bushings”, this bushing acts like a bearing but doesn’t move. The bushing is a porous bronze that wicks oil from the wick around the bearing. If they are still spinning a few drops ...


2

I have run into this several times, the least expensive method I have found is to remove the plate and use grout, epoxy grout in this case I can’t tell if there is backing but hot glue on a paint stir stick really works , any epoxy that is fast setting could also hold something in place. Then fill with the appropriate color (white in this case) grout. I like ...


2

I think you have a good plan except do not fill the gap with thinset, leave a small gap between the cement board and the tub and fill with caulk. You could apply some of the Mapei on the first few inches of the cement board.


2

A crow’s foot wrench is a suitable tool for this or a plumber’s wrench which works left or right. See basin wrench at Home Depot...


2

if a GU16 bulb, then you have to push -in- and turn. This is due to the little 'nubs' on the end of the connectors


1

If the water is not currently leaking that means that there is not an issue with a leaky pipe, but that water was flowing down the path of least resistance; i.e. the shower to the floor? The circumstances that you have related seem to point to the shower head being placed on the floor as the cause of your damage. To rule out other causes it would be best to ...


1

The stuff cures at about 1mm per day. Wait until it has cured all the way through before cutting into it.


1

A 6" adjustable, Crescent, wrench will fit up there nicely and then turn the screw from the top.


1

You're on the right track. Pliers or a wrench turned at an odd angle is how I get them off. You only need to loosen it a little bit before you should be able to do the rest with your fingers.


1

A semi-flexible trim such as a real wood or PVC quarter-round could be nailed to the wall, following its contour and concealing the gap. Because this is a wet area, definitely don't use an MDF type trim. If not trim, then caulk. Silicone caulks usually aren't paintable but latex caulks are. A bead of latex caulk painted with leftovers of the wall paint might ...


1

I don't like large patch jobs for this. They look like patch jobs and completely ruin your lovely aesthetic. If you can find a matching plate to install behind this escutcheon, go that route. Otherwise I'd work with tile: Find a matching or coordinating tile with bullnose edgers. Overlay a decorative tile mosaic using construction adhesive or mastic (...


1

That looks like a mortar bed with Turkey grit instead of larger aggregate. If you are removing the shower it can be busted up. Put a bar under one edge and a smack with a heavy hammer 3lbs or better and it will usually break (hitting over the void made by lifting) If you hit it while it is supported underneath it will only chip the surface most of the time ...


1

This looks like a Terrazzo flooring, which is marble chips poured in place with a bonding agent over a concrete floor. That looks like a sill so you should be able to whack it a few times with a sledge hammer and break it apart or break it free.


1

They are an invention from a time when there was a lot less electrical products and before the time of electric toothbrushes. They were designed for powering electric shavers only, as the name states. Their use has morphed over time to now charge devices. However, you are not supposed to use two at the same time. They are designed to power a single use item ...


1

A you hear all of the time mold needs moisture to get moving. But, it also needs time, and a food source. The Drywall and most surfaces give it that food source, but the time and moisture you can control. If the house is new, the fan should be fit to size. I say this, but sadly it's often not true. Also, if the roommate likes steamy shower rooms, a good fan ...


1

You could replace the soffit vent with one that has a flap to prevent air coming inside, maybe something like that. But if it's on the second floor, you'll need a tall enough ladder. Or you could pull the fan out from the bathroom (or visit the attic) and check if it has a one-way flap. Maybe it has one that is jammed open by cobwebs or something, and all ...


1

Many angle valves which are on the market, are not made of brass, but are zinc castings. They tend to deteriorate over a few years and tend to break off flush with the fitting in the wall. Using easy outs or rawl bolts, etc. to extract the remnants often fail as the wall thickness of the scrap in the wall is extremely thin. I have found that tapping a groove ...


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