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6

Generally speaking, you don't want to have a fan/light - or more specifically, a light - on GFCI because if the GFCI trips due to something else on the circuit then you are in the dark. As I understand it (I am not an electrician, but I have seen other questions on this topic and I heard this from my own electrician years ago when he installed heat/fan/light ...


5

If you don't want both shower heads to be on at the same time everytime you take a shower, then yes you need 2 controls. If you don't care if both head are on, then one control will be fine.


3

These are also known as “thermostatic” valves and are used on showers, but also for hot taps in schools, hospitals etc to limit the hot water to a defined safe limit. This is usually around 46 degrees C.


3

Tubs are big and intend to hold the water; drainage speed is not really important. Showers on the other hand have a low curb and can’t hold much water, so it is important that there is plenty of drain availability to prevent overfilling and flooding. Some tubs do have 2” wastes, but I think smaller drains are more common as it reduces the possibility of ...


3

What you have purchased is a new shower valve that also comes with the "trim", a shower head and a tub spout. Together, this is all commonly sold as a kit. These are made for installing a new shower or a "down to the studs" remodel where you are going to cut the plumbing in the wall to remove the old shower valve and install a new one. If this is what you ...


3

It seems to vary by manufacturer/model/style and perhaps personal preference. The shower knobs in one of my bathrooms were installed 2-3 years ago and are, by default, "off" when horizontal and "on" when vertical. Cold turns on CW and Hot turns on CCW. Below is an excerpt from the installation instructions for the faucet set that shows this as the way ...


2

In one of our bathrooms the tub/shower has the old Price-Pfister double valve with levers. When off the valve levers are oriented down; to open they are both swung outward: to open it's CCW for the cold and CW for the hot. The other bathroom has a shower with "old style" Price-Pfister two valves with cross handles handles (not levers). These valves work in ...


2

"on" should be handle-up. That is for ADA reasons. A motion-impaired person needs to be able to turn off the hot in a big hurry with a motion that will, by circumstance, be both frantic and awkward. However, that shouldn't exist. The reason is the whole legionella fiasco and water heater temperatures. You have to keep water heater temperatures below ...


2

Up (which typically stops at 90 degrees horizontal) is on. Down (vertical) is off.


2

When you turn that style of Moen control, it mixes hot water with cold to adjust the temperature; but first you need to pull out to get the water to flow...


2

From a performance perspective a slow drain in a tub means it takes a long time to empty. Slow drains in a shower mean that the water can end up sloshing over the curb while the occupant is doing their hair belting out Van Halen's greatest hits. But I suspect the actual answer is that there are way more multi-head showers than multi-tap tubs. Finding a 2" ...


2

There is no issue in sharing the neutral as it is on the LOAD side of the GFCI. Bathrooms do have specific codes which is pretty technical. I'll try to sum it up: All receptacles within a residential bathroom must be GFCI protected. If only one bathroom is being fed by a single 20A circuit, the lights and other small appliances like exhaust fans may also ...


1

I have two heads in the master, I don't remember any charge but I guess there was. You just add inexpensive shut-offs on each head , works fine. BUT , in the US , regulations require that these shut-off valves leak, so if you have a head turned off ,it will still drip. We usually have both on at the same time. It did take a couple trips to the "big box" ...


1

Assuming that it hasn't been flexed or otherwise damaged so much that its rigidity is compromised, sure. I also assume that either you have as water barrier behind or are relying on a good tile job for moisture management. The cement board isn't usually a substantial part of the moisture envelope. I'd use the same thinset mortar you plan on using for your ...


1

I have yet to see a mechanical "smart" valve which allows 100% hot water and adjusts it for less hot water once the temperature is too high. You would have to dive into digital solutions but I am not familiar with their internal mechanics: https://www.amazon.com/KOHLER-K-527-1CP-Digital-Interface-Polished/dp/B005ECLU2Q You could have a recirculation pump ...


1

These shower controls seem to be common in the UK, I've never seen one in the USA. I'd be very happy to find one here. I expect importing one and connecting it would be a pain with the different pipe threads and sizes between there and here. One knob sets temperature (thermostatically to a specific temperature, so you don't have to fiddle with it each time, ...


1

That's a tempering, (or temperature-control) valve, usually they are used to prevent scalding, but they could also be applied to pre-mix the shower water.


1

Any fortified thin set will work. I have used colored grout with add mix several times for glass block shower walls. Once the mortar is cured I then seal it the same as any tile job. There are pre mixed glass block mixes it is usually white.


1

Showers don't have to be open. I've seen and worked on many that had walls to the ceiling. I had a customer who had an open shower and inquired about closing it in because they had a breathing problem and wanted to breathe the steam. I enclosed it by adding two pieces of plexiglass mounted on top of the rails for the shower door and wall up to the ceiling.


1

Honestly? The easiest fix is to replace the whole towel rail, at your own cost. The only tools you'll need is a large Phillips screwdriver, and perhaps some cleaning products for the wall. The only critical measurement is the overall length. So take the old one off the wall, and go visit a hardware store. The US has Lowes or Home Depot or Walmart or ...


1

If you do try to drill the screw out a left-hand drill bit might be worthwhile. I've had a few occasions when drilling a broken fastener with a left-hand drill removed the fastener. I don't know that I've ever had success with an extractor -- it's difficult to get the hole centered, the right size, adequate depth.. and then the extractor just shatters in the ...


1

I assume you want to replace the faucet. Options: Drill it out. You don't care if you wreck the stem of the valve. Drill and try an extractor. I usually never can find one the right size. I have a set. Somewhere. Once your pretty sure that it's not holding the handle on, you may need additional persuasion to get the handle off. Start off with a low ...


1

That is the chrome inner sleeve from a knob that is now missing its external finned plastic portion. If it is not pulling off easily (they pull directly off, just like a knob should...) then you may need to use a faucet handle puller to remove it. Of course there are tricks-of-the-trade, like using penetrating oil and spraying up where the valve-stem ...


1

"grout... starting to erode or crumble away under squeegee action" Don't blame the sealer. Your grout was not prepared and/or applied properly. Applying a sealer now may help stabilize the grout but your best option would be to... re-regrout.


1

I have one of those that I have to unscrew then unscrew the drain itself, notice the hairs on the cross bars as you remove the drain assembly. Don’t break those hairs just unscrew the lower section and lift it up. What you wipe probably find is a wad of hair and soap scum. YUK! My wife daughters and most of my grand daughters have long hair, when they shower ...


1

You want to use high-quality clear silicone caulk for showers(Mildew resistant). You often get quality caulk at tile stores or GE makes a good one you can get from your local hardware or big box. After the old caulk is removed clean with white vinegar. The trick to a good caulk bead on your shower is to make sure it is completely clean and dry. Cut the ...


1

What you're looking for is clear silicone caulk. you want to peel off the old caulk, scrap the tile with a single edge razor blade to get all the old caulk off, clean with bleach to remove any trace of mildew and let dry. Then apply the caulk and let dry for 24 hours. The caulk can be bought at any home store or hardware. Here's a picture of a popular brand. ...


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