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3

That is not a really wet location I would leave it, I just hope they used a setting type joint compound. This may be an opinion as others may say omg it must be replaced but in the 50’s and 60’s it was common to tile the entire shower over drywall. If the shower was re sealed it lasted 30-40 years if not only ~20 years or that has been my experience on ...


2

The places where you really want the cement board are around the tub, in case the silicone caulk dies, that's where you get water infiltration (red arrows). Also the side opposite to the shower, especially the corner (orange arrow). The part where they ran out of cement board is going to be fine. You should check the fixtures (green highlight) don't allow ...


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I think my approach would look something like this: Dismount the door assembly from the shower wall frame and move it to a safe (soft) workspace. Pull the glass entirely free of the door frame. Pull the vinyl sleeve out of the door frame. Clean all parts thoroughly with bathroom cleaner, then alcohol, to remove all residue. Very gently attempt to flex the ...


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Drywall mud has no place under tile, IMHO. Given the cost and labor of tile, I don't think drywall has any place under tile, but that's not a well-accepted view for some reason. Wood looks to be a poor choice there as well, given the rust on the steel stud that's exposed. Of course, if the water source isn't fixed that stud and its friends may fail later on. ...


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It looks like you have a moisture problem in there so I'd be staying away from installing any wood or drywall. There are also some bull nose tiles that will have to be replaced but you have acknowledged that this will be a repair in progress. You should think about using cement board and installing it so when you add the tiles to it, they will be flush with ...


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I'd start out by removing the door and laying it down with the hinge on the floor and pushing the glass back into the hinge. That door will be heavy so know your strength limits. If the door was originally damaged by someone pushing down on it, this might fix it. If the glass doesn't hold into place in the hinge, try some clear epoxy in the slot and push the ...


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U can actually get a specialty shower rod or even a regular shower rod and put you up a shower curtain they make shower curtains that are for walk in showers they also make plastic accordion doors that can be used and they can actually work well and relatively cheap


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Identify: No practical means to do so. Also no need. Repair: Cut this mess out with a grout saw and regrout. Repair option 2: Remove and retile (since the tiling looks very sloppy, with grout line widths all over the map, which will make grout sawing extra fun!)


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Correct, I don't think it's a good idea for it to have any direct contact with the tile. So if you are not using a U-channel to mount it, then spacing it with some shims should work fine. And yes,, I wouldn't space it beyond 1/8". When you are caulking the edges, try to leave the shims in and caulk over it. But cut them so that it's hidden beneath the ...


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A 1/2" FIP x 3/8" barb is a very common fitting and should be available at any decent plumbing shop or even from the ubiquitous online seller with free shipping: Anderson Metals - 57002-0608 Brass Hose Fitting, Connector, 3/8" Barb x 1/2" Female Pipe


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