Hot answers tagged

52

OK I am going to answer this like you are in the US. It doesn't differ much but to give a baseline. To sum it up - This is F'ing crazy as hell, unsanitary, and not code. So it looks like there is a basin siphoned off from the foundation that drains to a sump pump and the pump pushes water to... who the hell knows (it doesn't matter). Issues: If ...


49

Since the pole is so thick and there's only one of them, it could have been the base of a satellite dish - like one of the old 8' dishes (big, not sure of exact measurements). The height is about right for that, and it's kinda short for a clothesline. It filling with water is just from the rain. I've never seen anything plumbing or well related that looks ...


47

1 inch pipe used to have an inside diameter of 1 inch. As the fittings attached to the outside, the OD had to stay the same for compatibility with the old stuff. The manufacturers fiddled with the wall and the matching of the actual measurements with the named size was abandoned just as it had been at the sawmill.


44

It is highly likely that that piping arrangement is made that way to facilitate the installation of a water softener. A water softener will have a need to accept a pipe with incoming hard water and another for the outflow of conditioned water to the rest of the residence. When a water softener is installed the U shaped fittings at the bottom of those two ...


28

My approach would be to turn off the water heater and the cold supply. Then open a hot tap below, or as close to the area of the leak, to drain the hot pipe. Then be prepared to catch the remaining water when you cut the pipe around the leak. Supplement: One can get “ice clamps” that can be used to isolate either side of the leak but can be fun if the ...


28

That valve is for a different type of piping system called CPVC and the sizes and fittings are different. The difference is deliberate because CPVC is rated for hot water whereas regular PVC is not; they don't want people to accidentally (or deliberately, to save money) install regular PVC pipe or fittings on a hot water system. Look at the valve label.


25

Most likely an abandoned fireplace chimney, if evidence supports the theory that the bathroom under that area has been added recently. Otherwise they may have re routed a bathroom exhaust fan into it. Take the cage off and look down it with a flashlight.


23

My vote is that it is for a clothes line/rack. Water is just accumulated over the years from rain. Example 1: Example 2:


23

It's true that, so long as the exit is lower than the entrance, water will find its way through the pipe even if there are low points in the path. However, as others have noted, debris could accumulate in those low points. So the answer to your specific questions "does it need to be continuously sloped" is a squishy "yes.. unless you're ...


20

Given all the ideas, the obvious solution would seem to be don't use sand. Instead, fill the bottom pipe with cement. Or fill it mostly with gravel with a few inches of cement or silicone sealant to hold the gravel in place.


18

There are different grades and types of copper pipe that you of course should be aware of. However I think your question is whether copper pipe is really a commodity type product - whether there's a difference between products of the same grade / type made by various manufacturers and sold by various retailers and wholesalers. This is a common question ...


18

Though a photo might help, from your description, this is most likely a drain, as you surmised, meant to take the flow from the water heater, should the over-pressure valve pop open or leak, and condensation from the air conditioner that has not evaporated. Since this drain receives little or no water on a regular basis, it could be blocked somewhere down ...


16

You only have to replace the wax ring if the toilet leaks. It's wise to replace it whenever you remove the toilet, though. It's not a matter of age, but the fact that a wax ring is intended to be a single-use item. They squish into place when you set a toilet, and that can't happen very well more than once. It's certainly possible that you achieved a ...


16

If you are in a climate where the water can freeze it is a definite problem. If not, there is still the potential for debris and sediment to settle in the low sections and eventually clog the pipe.


15

This could be part of a larger yard drainage system. It could let water from the screened end of the pipe drain out into some buried drain field. It could also drain onto a deep buried french drain construction consisting of a sizeable hole that was filled with crushed rock or similar. The fact that the part of the pipe that has the screen is working its ...


15

You have to pull the wire out. Period. What you're looking at here is the conduit wiring method. It's actually a very excellent way to run wiring, but I gather it's completely alien and unfamiliar to you. The gist is that you build the pipe route, then you run the wires through it, in that order. The wires can be any color and size you want. Now, Code ...


15

I'd be tempted to poke that large white fitting on a piece of flexi hose with a stick o see if it's really a trap that is meant to be screwed to the bottom of the bath drain. It's hard to tell for sure, but that long dip tube on the plug hole fitment looks like it's meant to be screwed into something and my betting is that the 'something' fell off when ...


14

Looks like a rain gutter or sump pump outlet. Place a noisy device directed into it and walk around and listen. You could probably bury the white pipe and just leave the grille exposed, flush with the lawn.


14

Your best bet would be the correctly sized metal screw. Not a bolt, but a screw. Some of them are self drilling/tapping (these are commonly referred to as simply "self-tapping" in the US). They will drill their own hole and tap their own threads all in one step. If you can't find the right sized metal screw, you can get a self-tapper a little bigger than ...


14

In a basement, galvanized pipe like that could have been a pipe feeding oil from an underground tank to an oil heater that has long ago been removed and replaced with something else. I had one like that and figured it out by looking at where an old chimney had been removed by looking at the sub-floor structures made to accommodate it. I didn't know exactly ...


13

Though it may seem odd, it is possible the plumber knows what he's talking about. If this is a Polybutylene pipe, it could indeed be brittle and fail if it's jostled during the installation of the filter. It's impossible to tell from the picture what type of pipe that is, but based on the plumbers concern I'd guess it is Polybutylene. Polybutylene ...


13

What you have is not solid. There's a foam or cellular interior to the pipe with two thin layers of sold ABS on the outside. It costs less and weighs less than solid pipe. Thus it's popular at home stores that compete on price. Not every jurisdiction allows use of cellular pipe. However it's common in the USA. You need to be careful about backfilling ...


13

April 13, 2016 Purpose: There is some disagreement as to whether boiling water can be poured down a residential kitchen sink without damaging the drain pipe. It might be assumed that if the pipe drains quickly, the amount of time necessary to cause damage would be greater than the actual time that the boiling water would be present in any particular ...


13

I have not seen patches hold up on copper. What I find best is to cut it at the hole and sweat a coupler on. It must be dry when you do the soldering or it will leak.


13

It seems pretty unlikely that the drainpipe would freeze in your crawlspace. Even if there was a 20 degree wind whipping through it (which there isn't: it's enclosed), the only way that could be is if there was standing water in the pipe to freeze. That would mean a trap in the crawlspace which would be highly unusual. And if you really had a frozen pipe, ...


12

Your crack is forming over and over because the steam pipe is getting hot, expanding, and cracking your plaster. The solution is to cut the plaster back about 1/4" from the walls of the pipe all the way around, then to cover the seam with an escutcheon that hides the crack. Example of a smaller escutcheon:


12

I'd use a small tubing cutter to cut tidy/clean ends on both ends of the 1/4" copper pipe ... ... cutting off whatever portions of the 1/4" copper pipe are kinked or deformed. I'd then slip on a compression fitting called a 'union' ... ... which requires tightening with a pair of wrenches. Wikipedia has a general article on compression fittings here. ...


11

Two ideas... Fill the pipe with sand, and then use an expandable foam like "Great Stuff" to fill the last several inches of the pipe. The polyurethane foam should stick well to the inside of the PVC, and the sand will not be able to pass through. A standard coupler has a lip in the middle to stop the pipe from sliding all the way through. Cut a disk of ...


11

Because there will still be a tiny bit of air access and thus water condensation. You want the insulation acting like an inverted bucket, not a bucket that will catch the water and hold it against the pipe. Catching the water will cause metal corrosion, mold, and waterlog the insulation. Making the insulation heavier will also tend to make it want to fall ...


11

Schedule 80 has thicker walls. The OD is the same for both 40 and 80, but the IDs for 80 is the same as the pipe size. Thus, 1/4" Schedule 80 has an ID of .25". Schedule 80 has higher pressure and tensile strength ratings because of the thicker walls.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible