Hot answers tagged

49

Since the pole is so thick and there's only one of them, it could have been the base of a satellite dish - like one of the old 8' dishes (big, not sure of exact measurements). The height is about right for that, and it's kinda short for a clothesline. It filling with water is just from the rain. I've never seen anything plumbing or well related that looks ...


47

1 inch pipe used to have an inside diameter of 1 inch. As the fittings attached to the outside, the OD had to stay the same for compatibility with the old stuff. The manufacturers fiddled with the wall and the matching of the actual measurements with the named size was abandoned just as it had been at the sawmill.


25

Most likely an abandoned fireplace chimney, if evidence supports the theory that the bathroom under that area has been added recently. Otherwise they may have re routed a bathroom exhaust fan into it. Take the cage off and look down it with a flashlight.


24

You should be able to tell by the color, and connections used. Gas "Black pipe" is commonly used for natural gas, and is dark grey/black. All connections will be threaded. Water Water lines come in a variety of materials, some of the most common are. Copper This will be um... copper, in color. While there are other ways to join copper pipes, the most ...


23

My vote is that it is for a clothes line/rack. Water is just accumulated over the years from rain. Example 1: Example 2:


20

I'd say it's a mark left by the plumber's torch while soldering the copper pipes rather than an electrical problem.


20

Given all the ideas, the obvious solution would seem to be don't use sand. Instead, fill the bottom pipe with cement. Or fill it mostly with gravel with a few inches of cement or silicone sealant to hold the gravel in place.


17

There are different grades and types of copper pipe that you of course should be aware of. However I think your question is whether copper pipe is really a commodity type product - whether there's a difference between products of the same grade / type made by various manufacturers and sold by various retailers and wholesalers. This is a common question ...


16

You only have to replace the wax ring if the toilet leaks. It's wise to replace it whenever you remove the toilet, though. It's not a matter of age, but the fact that a wax ring is intended to be a single-use item. They squish into place when you set a toilet, and that can't happen very well more than once. It's certainly possible that you achieved a ...


15

This could be part of a larger yard drainage system. It could let water from the screened end of the pipe drain out into some buried drain field. It could also drain onto a deep buried french drain construction consisting of a sizeable hole that was filled with crushed rock or similar. The fact that the part of the pipe that has the screen is working its ...


15

You have to pull the wire out. Period. What you're looking at here is the conduit wiring method. It's actually a very excellent way to run wiring, but I gather it's completely alien and unfamiliar to you. The gist is that you build the pipe route, then you run the wires through it, in that order. The wires can be any color and size you want. Now, Code ...


14

Looks like a rain gutter or sump pump outlet. Place a noisy device directed into it and walk around and listen. You could probably bury the white pipe and just leave the grille exposed, flush with the lawn.


13

Though it may seem odd, it is possible the plumber knows what he's talking about. If this is a Polybutylene pipe, it could indeed be brittle and fail if it's jostled during the installation of the filter. It's impossible to tell from the picture what type of pipe that is, but based on the plumbers concern I'd guess it is Polybutylene. Polybutylene ...


13

Your best bet would be the correctly sized metal screw. Not a bolt, but a screw. Some of them are self drilling/tapping (these are commonly referred to as simply "self-tapping" in the US). They will drill their own hole and tap their own threads all in one step. If you can't find the right sized metal screw, you can get a self-tapper a little bigger than ...


13

I have not seen patches hold up on copper. What I find best is to cut it at the hole and sweat a coupler on. It must be dry when you do the soldering or it will leak.


13

It seems pretty unlikely that the drainpipe would freeze in your crawlspace. Even if there was a 20 degree wind whipping through it (which there isn't: it's enclosed), the only way that could be is if there was standing water in the pipe to freeze. That would mean a trap in the crawlspace which would be highly unusual. And if you really had a frozen pipe, ...


12

Your crack is forming over and over because the steam pipe is getting hot, expanding, and cracking your plaster. The solution is to cut the plaster back about 1/4" from the walls of the pipe all the way around, then to cover the seam with an escutcheon that hides the crack. Example of a smaller escutcheon:


12

I'd use a small tubing cutter to cut tidy/clean ends on both ends of the 1/4" copper pipe ... ... cutting off whatever portions of the 1/4" copper pipe are kinked or deformed. I'd then slip on a compression fitting called a 'union' ... ... which requires tightening with a pair of wrenches. Wikipedia has a general article on compression fittings here. ...


11

Yes it's normal and what you want. It's called a P-trap and the water sitting in there seals out the sewer gasses. My ASCII P-trap: \ / | | __________ | | _________ \ / / \*\__/*/ \****/ ---- The asterisks would be the water that forms the stopper. In an empty home ...


11

Two ideas... Fill the pipe with sand, and then use an expandable foam like "Great Stuff" to fill the last several inches of the pipe. The polyurethane foam should stick well to the inside of the PVC, and the sand will not be able to pass through. A standard coupler has a lip in the middle to stop the pipe from sliding all the way through. Cut a disk of ...


11

April 13, 2016 Purpose: There is some disagreement as to whether boiling water can be poured down a residential kitchen sink without damaging the drain pipe. It might be assumed that if the pipe drains quickly, the amount of time necessary to cause damage would be greater than the actual time that the boiling water would be present in any particular ...


11

Because there will still be a tiny bit of air access and thus water condensation. You want the insulation acting like an inverted bucket, not a bucket that will catch the water and hold it against the pipe. Catching the water will cause metal corrosion, mold, and waterlog the insulation. Making the insulation heavier will also tend to make it want to fall ...


11

Schedule 80 has thicker walls. The OD is the same for both 40 and 80, but the IDs for 80 is the same as the pipe size. Thus, 1/4" Schedule 80 has an ID of .25". Schedule 80 has higher pressure and tensile strength ratings because of the thicker walls.


10

An overflow of suds is what you get when you use too much laundry detergent, or when you use a cleaning compound that is not intended for use in a washing machine. If you are using an appropriate product and you are getting excess foam (foaming out of the machine, or residual foam in the garments, or foaming out of the drain), cut the amount you use in half....


10

I suspect you actually have two questions: 1) Does it meet current code, and 2) Do I have to do something about it. My understanding is that in most places you can't do anything new with lead gas pipe, BUT there's no obligation to upgrade old service as long as it's working OK. My understanding is that most places won't even let you replace lead pipe ...


10

That's known as a slip joint. If you remove the slip nut, you should find a beveled washer on the pipe. To put the joint together, you'll slide the slip nut onto the upper pipe, followed by the beveled washer (bevel side down). Then you'll slip the upper pipe inside the lower pipe, and use the nut to tighten the joint. Looks like it's a waste tee similar ...


9

I wouldn't worry about the scum left over - what you really need to do is get rid of the BIG gunk that's catching the little gunk that eventually clogs your sink. For clogged drains, a hand held auger is your tool of choice for cleaning stubborn clogs out of bathroom pipes.


9

Unfortunately, you have gotten yourself into a situation that is most likely going to require opening the wall to replumb the water supplies and possibly the drain. If you have access to the back through another wall, then you will not have to remove some tiles. If you don't have access, then you have to open it up from the front, not an easy job. The ...


9

Yes, it's common. In fact, nearly all modern residential construction uses plastic PEX piping (and it's widely considered superior to copper). Now, perhaps your plastic pipe is wrong... but that would be interesting as it's no simple task to replace an entire water main... Can you take a better photo of the plastic pipe?


9

Isn't that your water meter on the inside of your house, that the black city line feeds? Shouldn't the whole house water filter be going AFTER the water meter? In which case the black pipe is irrelevant, is it not? Which leads me to think - you need a different plumber.


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