New answers tagged

1

All you need to do is adjust the P-trap up slightly. Once you have your tail piece cut and in place you slip your P-trap over the end of it and just slide it up ever so little in order to achieve the small slope before you tighten down the slip nut. Do not cut the tail piece too short, you can make it shorter but it very difficult too make it longer and ...


3

Most of them are 89 degree bends (not 90 degrees) so they have about 1 degree of slope which is all that is needed. most diagrams exaggerate the slope so that the reader can see it, and so that the picture will fit on the page.


2

I have always used plumber's putty. Never had leaks at that point and agree with the person who said it allows a more flush fit. Do not use cooking oil if you use the rubber gasket. Use silicone based valve grease. It will keep the rubber supple over time, is compatible with rubber and will keep the rubber from deformity during the installation. Though if ...


1

There is not a minimum you can do what you want. I agree with freeman that it may be prone to clogging or drain a little slower but you can make those changes and see how it works it may be just fine.


0

I have always heard those type are called pop up drain plugs , it looks like yours is missing the rubber seal. If when you press it it drops down and press again it pops up you probably only need to find the rubber seal.


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Search popup click drain plug. https://duckduckgo.com/?q=popup+click++drain+plug&iar=images&iax=images&ia=images


1

Seeing air bubbles usually indicates a problem with the vent stack that comes out your roof. The vent stack serves as an escape route for any air in the pipe to go when water and poo poo are put into the system. If it's not built correctly, or clogged, the air has to go somewhere, so it eventually makes its way up your drain. If you were the homeowner, I'...


2

There's a very good chance it's caused by a blockage from a lower unit. You could try running a snake down your shower drain to see if you could clear the obstruction. Other than that, since it's a rental let the landlord know about this as other units might be affected. He should be the one to call the professional, not you.


1

First, don't do it. I just finished cleaning out a bathroom sink drain clogged with latex paint. First, if your tub/shower and toilet are draining properly the clog is probably in the trap. Get a bucket and some rags and get down and take it off. Use a flashlight to shine down the drain to make sure it isn't clogged. Take the trap and trap arm outside ...


1

You have what is called an adjustable P-trap. The horizontal leg that runs into the slip-joint fitting at the wall pipe can be moved in and out of the wall pipe. You simply loosen the slip-joint nut in your picture and slide the trap arm further in to make the whole trap assembly move closer to the wall: It looks to me like you have at least another inch of ...


1

I assume your asking about how to tie your sink drain to the wall stub. Standard 1 1/2" PVC drain pipe has slp compression fittings that give you a lot of flexibility in setting up your P trap and drain. In most cases you can make adjustments without shortening the wall stub. However, in some cases you may have to shorten the wall stub. If you ...


1

OK, you're going to need a drain pipe extension attached to your new drain pipe. Remove the blue protective tape. It might just be easier to replace your pipe with a longer PVC pipe rather than having to cut your pipe to fit the extension in.


0

Use your favorite internet search engine (or just walk into your favorite local plumbing supply house or home improvement center) and look for: sink tail pipe extension Purchase, assemble, cut off 90% of what you just bought, connect the trap to the remains of the extension. The shortest one you'll probably find is 6". Since you only need about 6mm, you ...


2

So although I agree with Jason's answer that there is no technical way to fix this the "Correct" way without tearing it out and starting again, I decided to try my own permanent solution to attempt to avoid a costly repair. What I ended up doing is going out and getting two packs of Loctite's marine epoxy. This is supposed to bond to PVC, concrete ...


1

You might need to use a Fernco coupling to get everything hooked back up. It's a rubber coupling with hose clamps to hold the rubber in place like this: Source: SupplyHouse.com No endorsement of the vendor intended or implied - they just had a nice pic. I'd use it on the 1 1/2" pipe up to the 2nd floor. Slide it on the 1 1/2" pipe, up and out of ...


0

I'd use a 2" to the basement, 1.5" to sink and 1.5" to upstairs. Glue the section of the tee to the basement first, then get your straight 1.5" piece and glue it to the top of the tee. Get a pvc slip connector for the 1.5" to 1.5" pipes. Get all your pieces and play around with them to see the best way to position them to the ...


1

Rubber coating won't provide enough height to be effective. You need at least an inch or two to change the course of a stream. I think I'd look at a bolt-down speed bump, and I'd put foam "sill seal" underneath it to be sure to get a good seal against the driveway.


0

Well, as long as it does not go into the U-bend where the water trap is (prevents smalls coming up) then it will be fine. I always make sure it goes in at least 6" as I have seen the force when it starts pumping to push the hose out - leading to some clearing up, one way to get a clean floor though :)


0

Air admittance valves aren't allowed because they tend to fail over time and because they can leak sewage in a backup. Obviously such a situation can result in overflow elsewhere, but that's the rule. As you've implied, flow from upstairs creates vacuum as it rushes past such a connection. If there's an opening for air to enter, as there always is with a ...


3

In most areas I'm familiar with, gutters don't drain into the sewage or storm drain systems. This looks like a flow diverter, but a very poor one. Are there any holes in the PVC pipe? The ones I've seen are much longer and have holes so they act like a French Drain but they usually head away from the house and not along side of it. You can just add a 90 ...


2

it was installed wrong, there's no real correct way to fix this other than starting again and using the correct fitting. The correct way is to use the pipe fitting that matches the shower base, you may be able to do from below or it may require disassebling the shower floor and walls in addition to cuttihg a hole in ceiling of the room below. Next best is ...


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