New answers tagged

0

What I did was run a razor around the perimeter, and I thought it was useless because it didn't seem to be getting in between the grate and the surrounding, and I don't think there was any silicone or anything there, but I noticed plastic or something accruing on the razor, so it was doing something. Then I used 1 screwdriver to pry from one of the square ...


3

Try running a very sharp knife or razor blade around the edge of the cover plate to help break the seal of what might be holding it. It looks like there's caulk or grout in there. I'm not sure you'll notice much of a change, but it could help get a hold under the edge and aid you in gently prying it up.


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As mentioned in comments, the issue is the air getting trapped inside the pipes. I made 6 small holes in the top part of the S trap to prove this theory and worked like a charm. I'll now replace the upper elbows with a T join or whatever people call that and add a air valve on the top end. CREDIT: ILLUSTRATION BY DAVE BRANDON Source


4

As noted in a comment, I would suggest looking for a shorter tail piece without the fancy, tall nut (which, I'm sure, works very nicely for hand-tightening). Normally the nut would be less than an inch tall, and it appears that a very short tail piece with a normal size nut would give you all the room you need to mate the two pieces up without ripping into ...


0

There are a few problems here. Even though the drain pipes below are clear you can often get hair and sludge clogs up just under the stopper. Did you check there? The design is all wrong. You have an S trap rather than a P trap. Not sure where you are but S traps are against code in the US. The problem with an S trap is that when the water is draining down ...


1

You'll need to open the wall and set the wall stub out at the proper level, patched the drywall, and mudded/sanded/painted to meet code. You can't flex hose and a trap deeper than 4" can allow the trap to siphon. https://www.jlconline.com/how-to/plumbing/deep-traps_o


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Most older homes in Europe that were built in the days before indoor plumbing have their sanitary drains on the outside of the house. I worked in an large industrial complex that did the same (northern New Hampshire). Sometimes a heat trace with thermostat is used.


-2

Just use a tail piece extension. Why are you adding all this extra work. Its very simple. If your drain line coming out of the wall is lower than the the tail piece of the fixture its serving, then extend the tail piece with an extender. This is exactly why they make em. All this extra work your doing is 1. Illegal in most states 2. Has the potential for a ...


2

That's probably a polypropylene drain trap tailpiece, not a PVC pipe at all. Thinner wall, different sizes, different techniques to seal. The corroded bit with threads looks like a trap adapter upon careful examination. Tailpieces slip-fit into those and the nut on the end tightens to make a seal against a wedge-shaped washer around the tailpiece. No threads ...


0

It may be, judging by your red arrow, that you are trying to turn the wrong thing. Do not use an impact wrench. Use two pipe wrenches. It looks like the drain is out at the end of an "arm" of pipe, and if you turn too hard with one wrench or an impact wrench you'll likely damage the area marked as E below. To repack the stem you want to hold A ...


0

I would use heat, your seat is already leaking so a torch would be a better option. Heat applied to the left of the arrow. Depending on the type of valve stem packing you will probably need to replace that also but since you are rebuilding the valve it would be a good idea to re pack it anyway.


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So many different comments. First of all we need to know whether the OP is on sewer or septic. It makes a big difference. I had a rental that was on a Glendon System (pressurized pumped system) The controller alarmed indicating there was a fault. The renters silenced the alarm and didn't tell me. It's a two story house (like the OP's house), they ...


1

Had this same experience with a rear-mounted toilet, where the plumbing line entry is on the wall instead of on the floor. The flushing power works different on rear-mounted toilet that the more popular floor mounted. Snaking and/or letting the clog sit a little like overnight etc. did help, but after several attempts, I learned the only way to keep this ...


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