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Try @JACK solution of cutting off bad threads. You might also try a different style slip-joint washer (they come in plastic or rubber). Tighten the fitting, hand tight is not enough. If that doesn't work, the fitting is toast. I would cut it off and glue a new one on, then use the proper slip-joint assembly with no glue, goop, caulk, goo, or any other such ...


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Here are several ideas that came to mind. (attempt to) Repair the threads Heat will soften the black ABS so you could improve its shape, but it's probably not realistic to hope for sealing with this alone. Augment with plumber's putty Roll a rope of putty with thickness similar to the gasket and wrap it around the PVC so that it contacts before the ...


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I'm guessing you're going to get a few opinions on this so I'll start out by saying what I'd try. I'd get one of those rotary tools with a cut off disk and start cutting right where the dent ends and cut all the way around the circumference of the fitting. You might be able to do it with a hack saw blade. Then I'd chamfer the inside edge with some emery ...


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I would use, and have used, a sealer designed for plumbing systems that is designed not to harden and stays sticky - works a treat. I think it is called plumber’s mait But it sticks to your fingers as well... seal the joints with it and you don’t have to tighten the threads much. Think about how the joint works so you don’t apply too much ie work out where ...


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They used an existing drain to save you some money and save themselves some work. I can't think of a reason the drain would have to run under the house other than they wanted it to exit the house there for aesthetic reasons. What you propose sounds fine. If you have a consistent slope that should keep it from clogging. One thing to consider is to put a trap ...


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Ask the company that did the work if your plans would void the warranty. Regardless of anything any of us could say on here, it comes down to the company honoring the warranty.


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Cutting is the only way to get it off, I doubt that it was original most homes that age were galvanized & cast iron. The supply looks to be galvanized is the reason I would think it’s not original. They didn’t leave any good place to cut it from what I see. You will probably need to remove the expanding foam hopefully there will be a hub or something you ...


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Two issues come to mind here. First, I think the way your toilet is flushing is not related to the way your waste lines are plumbed. Unless you have another toilet of the same make and model that flushes differently, I think that's just how yours works. Even if your venting was nonexistent, your 4" waste line should have plenty of air space to let it work ...


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that dark stuff is concrete or mortar screed under the tiles. the light stuff is tile adhesive and grout You can grout over those triangular bits without causing any problems.


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I have a cover EXACTLY like yours. Mine just lifted right up. Not sure if there was supposed to be some kind of sealant, but it would not surprise me that the installers "forgot".


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You probably used the heavy rubber washer that came with the drain set. I had the same problem and solved it by removing the thick washer and using plumber's putty instead.


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so some of the waste water from the dishwasher returns to the dishwasher when it finished pumping that's completely normal. There's no real way to prevent that. So long as you don't get water from the sink or from the drain flowing into the dishwasher everything is fine.


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This is exactly what an air gap is supposed to prevent. This is something that sits on the edge of the sink, and lies between the dishwasher and disposal, but I don't see one in your setup. This ensures that any backflow pressure won't go all the way back to the dishwasher. You can buy one at any home improvement store, but installing it might be annoying.


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Because, as others have pointed out, the overflow is a straight shot down the drain pipe and the bathtub drain has a couple of nasty 90-degree corners that the snake isn't likely to get past. Here's a picture of the typical set-up:


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