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41

I would build a decorative arbor over the path. Its purpose would be to camouflage a basic gutter and downspout arrangement that dumps into the pond. Simple as can be. Image source


22

You could call it an "inverted syphon"... I'm searching for a word here, but it's not coming to me. Build a leak-tight pipe that starts at the house above the top of the pond wall. The pipe goes down, underground, laterally to the pond, up the exterior of the pond wall, then over the wall and dumps into the pond. This pipe will be pressurized so ...


7

Run your down spouts into barrels. Plumb these barrels together into a central feed. These can run underground if you'd like, so long as the pipes have the proper slope, gravity will be your friend. Have a sump pump (or other, float-activated pump) pump the water up and over the retaining wall. Depending on how full your pond normally is and how much rain ...


6

You appear to be setting this up to fail. Don't do that. If you have three tanks at different elevations, your fire truck fill point is the bottom of the lowest one. Your system fill point and vent is the top of the top one. If the two lower tanks won't hold pressure (typical concrete tank that does not really have a tight seal at the top) you'll need float ...


5

Sometimes the hose barb fittings on a pump or device are removable so you can swap them for another fitting that suits your use. Here, it looks like the hose barbs are molded into the plastic of the pump housing. For this you can use a short length of vinyl or silicone tubing and a hose barb-PVC fitting of the proper size (shown here). You'd have a few ...


4

I had something like this in my garage where a water softener was previously. When the water softener was removed it was easier for the previous owner to just connect the pipes instead of opening up the wall and/or rerouting the plumbing to a less noticible location.


3

Filling the tanks should be easy. When the fire department shows up with a tanker, they should have a pump that will provide more than enough pressure to push the water uphill. Remember that it can take 2 or 3 men to hold a hose against the pressure coming out of it! If you hire a pool filling company, they may count on simple gravity flow to get the water ...


3

It sounds like you have more than 1 bad valve. The valve to the home is leaking and the ones to the shower are leaking. If really old you might turn a bit harder for a gate valve, if that won’t shut it off open a hose bib they are usually the lowest point on the system. Then pull the faucet stems and replace the washers. After replacing the washers on the ...


3

It is not terribly safe, though weaving it over/under supports as they did at least helps to make sure it won't go flying around. Temporary installations like holiday lights are always a bit of a problem. A few things to help mitigate potential problems: GFCI - This is probably the most important thing. GFCI is now required for outdoor receptacles but many ...


3

I feel your pain, I live in Western Washington and have the same issue. One way to protect against gopher damage is a larger pipe. Like 2" conduit or similar. They can't open their mouths enough to gnaw on it. But it's not an "old wives tale". Gophers can do a lot of damage to buried lines. So if I were doing this, I'd at least put in 2&...


3

This sounds like an ideal situation for a condensate pump. Those are miniature sump pumps with a built-in reservoir. You drain your seepage into this, and the pump pumps it up and away when the reservoir reaches a certain level. Just make sure you get one with the capacity to pump as high as you need to to reach the outside, a drain, or whereever you want to ...


2

Does your cellar have a sump pump? If so, you should be able to divert the water into the pit and let the pump do its thing. If not, then you will need to setup something like that with a place for the water to drain to, a pump with a level-sensing switch, and an outlet pipe to carry the water to a good drain. BTW, are you sure that bleeding from the bottom ...


2

This answer incorporates some of the info provided in comments. To simplify Harper's answer a bit, I'm pretty confident this system will work just fine: During a time when the pond is low, you can dig your trench and install pipe underground, entering the pond underneath the wall. When the pond fills (from roof runoff or other means), you'll have standing ...


2

It may be easier to find Barb to Pipe thread and Pipe thread to PVC connectors than a direct transition. You'll still need a short section of hose and hose clamps on the barbed part of the fittings.


2

Either get a new handle, or use a wrench on the flats of the valve shaft to turn it (just 1/4 turn, by the look of that valve.)


2

This is a false economy Obviously what you are trying to do here is preserve the sunk cost of the tanks that are too low to do the job. You are in pursuit of a fallacy. The simple fact is, 2 of these tanks are in the wrong place! So if the Fire Department is requiring a certain amount of water onsite that comes out of one standpipe without operating valves, ...


1

Sounds like water hammer. I had a similar issue with mine. Your local hardware store should carry a device you can install on your water lines that basically has a little expansion volume to reduce the effects of water hammer. Easy to install, solved my issue.


1

when the sediment filter is very dirty. It can make water harder to pass through This is TRUE- when the media is clogged, it takes water longer to pass through, so I guess an alternate way to express that would be that it is "harder" for water to pass through. as the sediment filter traps more dirt, rust, it becomes more effective filter This is ...


1

All else being equal, and using the numbers provided, not the actual sizes. The slimline filter has marginally more surface area, so it might be slightly faster flowing. If flow rate is important install two filters side by side and you will get double the flow rate.


1

I think the things you mentioned are solvable, though cannot venture a guess as to the cost. First thing is to identify the source of the water in the crawlspace. The ground around the house has a good slope towards the back, so it should be relatively easy to direct any surface water away from the foundation - much easier than if you had a totally flat lot....


1

Expansion tanks are $30. https://www.homedepot.com/p/Eastman-2-Gal-Thermal-Expansion-Tank-60022/205364872 They have a bladder that expands with increase in pressure and accommodates the additional size of the water. The bladder retracts when the pressure declines.


1

Most cords are rated SJ at a minimum the junior hard service cord of which there are 17 variations all rated for damp locations and 1/2 include wet locations. So as long as the cord is in good shape and the end is not in the water I would not be concerned. Additional safety ? A home less than ~20 years old maybe 30 the outside circuits will be GFCI ...


1

So long as the insulation on the extension cord is in good shape, this is no more or less dangerous than attaching it to the wall would have been. Notice at the bottom of the picture where the cord comes out of the gutter? It's exposed to rain right there, too. While it may not be soaking in water, it will still get wet there. Either the insulation will ...


1

IF you can drive during this event then stuff something in it for now and go get sandbags, or supplies for making them if they are available. If you can NOT drive, there may assistance available from your local municipality to have officials or volunteers bring you sandbags. You can apply caulking to the gap under the threshold on the exterior, (this ...


1

That's as good an excuse as any for buying an endoscope. I've wanted one for a while. You did not say if you have hard or soft water. That matters. I think your tank is too far gone. Tanks that do not get anode rod replacements are typically good for 8-15 years depending on usage. Tanks that do can go from 15-25 years that has been my experience. Your ...


1

Since you are providing access to the backflow preventer... Since you are providing an irrigation box for the backflow preventer, which means that you can access the preventer down the road, your plan is sound as far as that goes. Note that Double Check Valve assemblies are considered testable, which means that in many jurisdictions, you will need to test ...


1

Not a calculated method, but if that home is yours and you're planning to spend a good few years in it, I would put in the 1" main PEX to water heater and as you go to edge water outlets of the house, convert that 1" to 3/4". The cost of 1" vs 3/4" isn't too drastic and having the extra capacity, especially to the water heater will ...


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