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8

I would use Oatey “hot” glue it sets faster than regular but cost a bit more , only get a small can as it evaporates faster also. You can see the label most standard solvents require an hour or longer depending on the diameter , but hot glue is ready in as short as 10 minutes. Primers also help but hot glue doesn’t need primer or the orange stuff I use doesn’...


7

Water heaters have pans. You place the pan under the water heater, then attach a hose to send the water someplace less damaging. You can also get water sensors, which rest on the floor and sound an alarm if water is detected. There's less stuff for dishwashers and washing machines, as they only contain water when in use, and there should be someone nearby ...


5

PVC isn't connected with adhesive, it's solvent welded. The "cement" is actually a solvent which dissolves the surface of pipe and fitting, fusing them into one piece as it evaporates. The real trick is getting the stuff together before that happens, because you only have a handful of seconds to work with. Proper planning and preparation help. If you've ...


4

Some of these are supplied with “stop leak” hoses on their incoming supply pipe. Also some washing machines have the base designed with a “dip” with a sensor to turn off the internal valve if it senses water - caught my ex-wife out for a week until number one son looked at it :) ...


4

If you're looking for a somewhat quick fix without much work, you can take a look at some plumbing epoxy putty such as this. This is a two part epoxy putty that you mix together and then wrap the leaking connection. I would clean the connection very well and sand the area to rough it up before starting. This will allow you to make the repair without ever ...


3

I've fulfilled customer requests for overflow trays in cases of integrated laundry equipment, for example. You'd essentially install or build a shower pan (with all the same drain plumbing). What type and profile is appropriate depends on the situation. I wish my dishwasher had one as a one-time overflow recently did significant damage to my kitchen floor. ...


3

We often get cases where a person becomes fixated on one method, and loses sight of the big picture/overall purpose of the exercise. (This often manifests as the "XY Problem"). Your goal is not to abuse an Instant Pot; it's to humidify your home. Step back. You're ready to spend money. Just buy the right thing. You've plainly stated that you're ready to ...


3

You might not need PVC glue at all. A viable alternative to gluing would be a screw-tight compression coupling like this one. The catch with, say, a Sharkbite is you need square-on pressure to push the connectors in. This is problematic for repairing existing in-ground pipes (you can't exactly "pull" the pipe). The compression coupler solves that by ...


3

I've heard this before, in a single story house where the water main entered the building near the bathroom, but because there was a hallway with a solid floor between there and the kitchen, the hot and cold pipes ran up through the attic, then back down to the sink and dishwasher. All was fine for years until some work was done in the bathroom, moving a ...


2

The 2017 NEC does not specify minimum separation. In a dwelling unit 125v receptacles in laundry areas require GFCI protection. In other than dwelling units laundry areas are not specified, but within 6' of a sink 150v to ground or less single phase receptacles 50A or less and 3 phase receptacles 100A or less also requires GFCI protection. (Each leg of a ...


2

From a corrosion consideration it should be good: Except check that the clamping screw on the CTS end is stainless steel , non-magnetic would be best. A steel screw would not likely last long on a brass/bronze fitting underground. The fitting has a more reddish color than yellow brasses which is means better corrosion resistance ( less zinc and more copper ...


1

If there is a push-on fitting that meets your needs, such as from Sharkbite or one of their competitors, you can have the whole job done in less than one minute. A photo of your plumbing would clarify, but I'd be surprised if there isn't a push on fitting that would work. Please don't expect anything you apply externally to work properly. Either use real ...


1

You could likely rig something using a float valve. They make pretty small ones that you could supply with tubing. They are available with metal floats too. These are very common for household, commercial, and industrial applications. In fact, visit any farm with livestock and you will probably see a larger size one in action, to keep livestock watering ...


1

I had a similar problem and it ended up being a toilet valve that was wearing out. Have someone run the water and you stand by each toilet when they turn the water off and see if you can hear the toilet running for a few seconds. In my case the valve was worn and the impact when the water was turned off was enough to unset the seal for the toilet valve. It ...


1

This is a fairly common thing to do for espresso or even pod-type coffee machines that come standard with a water tank. A lot of people desire to have the tank fill itself without having to manually remember to fill it all the time. So if you search for something like "Espresso Machine Tank Fill Valve", you will find some instructions and examples of what ...


1

It could be a pressure imbalance in the hot & cold lines, the valve cartridge being slightly off center, the design of the valve, or even thermal expansion or contraction within the valve. It's not uncommon for the hot/cold mix to be unbalanced at very low flow, just adjust the lever a little.


1

Ideally.. Turn the power off to the water heater. Turn off the water to the building. Remove the water from the entire building, including the water heater, toilet tanks and water supply lines. Pour RV antifreeze into every waste trap, including the toilet bowls. The building is now winterized and your safe even if the heat goes off. If the heat goes off ...


1

The hot/cold mixer valve and/or the 1/2" valve outlet make installation of 3/4" pipe, downstream on the run to the shower head, unnecessary; you will have no appreciable benefit from this. Also, I imagine that your "rain shower" unit has a 1/2" inlet (although you don't mention this). Your concern about "wasting hot water" doesn't make sense to me; your ...


1

I would carefully remove old grout do not use anything too sharp in case where waterproof membrane has been used … when replacing the grout make sure it is adequate for some of the larger gaps as some grouts can do up to 1/8"gaps only...after all that is done … use a good grout sealer approx 1 week after grout application


1

Grout is more an aesthetic here. It's porous, so it's not a prevention against water intrusion. Water will penetrate your grout. It's the stuff underneath the tile that should prevent water intrusion to the things that cannot get wet. I would scrape or grout saw the old grout out. Ideally, you want to do this to the whole bathroom, as this new grout is ...


1

I used caulk to fix issues like this. You can order it in different colors to fit your grout (amazon link). I also recommend getting a caulk gun. I didn't get one the first time and it was a pain. It is doable without though but caulk guns are cheap and actually pretty useful in other situations as well with different types of caulk. Dry time is pretty long ...


1

Hmmm. Pour water to activate it sounds like a Jet pump. Replace it with a submersible pump (Two-wire is more reliable than 3-wire in the modern era, I think - not to mention the wire costs less and on the comparable models I was comparing could also be one size smaller.) Jet pumps are a holdover from a bygone era when electric motors were much less ...


1

Water hammer happens when you abruptly close a valve. Water has mass. Once you get it moving toward the valve, if you slam the valve shut, the water is still moving. It slams into the closed valve and bounces -- water cannot compress. Where can that ultimately go in a house where all the pipes are 100% full of water and all valves closed? Back out to the ...


1

Some times a small leak can cause water hammer. It is rare but I have a leak that was not much more than a slow drip cause a loud water hammer it was like a resonant frequency it was very loud and the pipes were not moving much but they were vibrating and making a loud squeal. Once I found the leak and stopped it the problem was solved.


1

Yes, you can in most cases. Water heaters have 3/4" connections to allow for increased flow and pressure where it's needed and where the pipes are larger, but that doesn't mean your plumbing has to match. The heater will flow at the same rate (more or less) as a straight run of 1/2" pipe in your case. If anything, the heater will perform better at heating ...


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