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4

Can't be guaranteed but it probably will fit using your existing plumbing fittings. You have tons of space and plenty of vertical drop to the wall drain. Everything you have there is compression/slip joints that have some room to slip in and out and rotate. The new unit is 3/4" wider so you'll rotate it and the trap to a position where they line up, ...


3

Which is generally considered superior for garbage disposal grind components, galvanized steel or stainless steel? As noted in the other answer, the manufacturer warranty is probably a much better indicator of quality than anything else. There are many variables that affect durability, even just of the cutting blades, never mind the rest of the appliance, ...


2

If you are buying just one or two (or probably anything up to a pallet full), you really don't get to pick this kind of spec. The specs you will generally get to choose (by picking different models) are: Power - Typically advertised in horsepower (e.g., 1/2 HP, 1/3 HP) but more properly measured here in Amps (current) or Watts (power), which should be ...


2

Your problem is not so much the low flow rate but the limited amount of storage you have. Quite a few years back I set up a 50 gallon reservoir tank and booster that fed the existing pressure tank. This was basically the same system that you have but I added the tank and booster pump. The booster pump after the reservoir. The Ro system was changed from the ...


2

1: Clothes are inadequately dried. Sitting in the washer too long can do it. Too much water left in the clothes and inadequate drying can do it. Things grow in the clothes. Clothes were once inadequately dried and now are colonized. Especially for towels - I think they get colonized and then the colonies spring to life. Colonies survive subsequent ...


2

Yes you can have the spigot on the same post but not normally on the same side. RV parks regularly have the water at the same location. It’s like having a water heater adjacent to the main panel in a home there are some that think it is a code violation but it is not.


2

You should only join same type fittings with the correct cement. PVC is white, CPVC is almost tan or dark off white, ABS is black. The threaded PVC-like fittings (they are actually polypropylene) use a silicone or plastic compression gasket or fitting to seal the connection. Plumber's putty is not durable enough to seal two fittings. The various pipe cements ...


1

The side of the post would probably be ok, but pay special attention to: NEC 110.26 Space About Electrical Equipment. 110.26 (E)(2) Outdoor. Outdoor installations shall comply with 110.26(E)(2)(a) through (c). (c) Dedicated Equipment Space. The space equal to the width and depth of the equipment, and extending from grade to a height of 1.8 m (6 ft) above ...


1

No not on the opposite side there is no requirement for it to be separated. The national electric code requires a space of 30 inches wide or the width of the equipment to be clear but I regularly put service panels adjacent to sinks or water heaters with the 30” going to the other side of the panel. I believe this is what your neighbor may be saying and your ...


1

The Jack hammer of the pipes is water hammer (physical movement) Why are your dead legs not absorbing the shock. 2 possibilities; 1st the dead leg has filled with water, I have heard of this happening but have not experienced it. Draining the pipe and allowing the dead leg to drain and refill with air. Second is the new patched section of pipe allows for ...


1

Is that 3/4 inch PVC? If so then it's very likely a backup drain line for a furnace and/or evaporator coil (A/C). It might be dumping on your garage floor on purpose to warn you that the main drain line is clogged. I would expect it to drip whenever your A/C is turned on.


1

If there is no wiggle room as jay613 suggested you will have no choice but get other parts. The T is not directly centered between both sink drains because the disposal outlet is angled back. The new dispoal will offset the T regardless where you place the outlet The horizontal pipe can be shortened or replaced with a longer one but you will have to change ...


1

Bacteria and mold are not reported as growing in tankless water heaters. AFIK the absence of an anode has nothing to do with mold growth, and the presence of an anode in a hot water tank does not inhibit mold or bacteria. Off odor might be coming from odor substances in the incoming city water. Alternatively, sometimes clothes washers develop mold, ...


1

Copy an existing design Here's another answer with an approach to doing this the way you want. I'm not advocating this, but I think it solves some of the problems. The design is stolen from a macerating toilet. In the photo you could analogize the small vessel collecting condensate via an air gap to the toilet bowl, and the trap to the toilet's serpentine ...


1

The place where the pump enters the waste line would need to have a trap and a vent just like any other fixture. Seems like a lot of effort for a condensation line. An easier, maybe ugly way to do this would be to pump into the open side of an existing fixture (toilet or sink) in the level above. An even easier approach would be to pump to the outside. ...


1

I read the question as meaning to ask whether the dark area is indicative of persisting moisture, and thus that the wall or ceiling is still in need of repair. To diagnose the problem you can intrusively cut a small hole, perhaps 1 in diameter with a hole saw, and inspect the cuttings and the exposed drywall. This will require a patch job to restore. ...


1

It would appear that the ground settled, and there was too much friction between the wrap and the backfill so the settling ground took the wrap with it. Since this appears to be an external waterproofing layer, if the top edge is still above soil line, and you don't have leaks, it's probably fine. It does suggest that you might want to check the grade around ...


1

That looks like an olive for use with a copper pipe. The pex fittings I use have a split collar as they are designed with the water seal internally onto the brass spigot and the nut/collar is to secure the pipe into place.


1

Not sure what it might be called where you are, but there's a "reinforced stucco" (might be called reinforced render in where you are) that can be used to drystack blocks and then bond them together as a unit - parging a layer of that around the inside would provide some structural benefits. If you can't find the product as a product, you might be ...


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