37

You don't have a trap seal, to prevent air from moving through the drain. Only the dishwasher is draining through the trap, so there's no trap to prevent air from coming up the drain. you'll have to fix the plumbing, so that both the sink and dishwasher use the trap. Instead, the plumbing should look more like this... Use a tailpiece like this, off the ...


15

The smell of sewage is definitely a bad sign and means that either a trap has gone dry or a connection somewhere is bad releasing sewer gasses. Maybe this is related to the vermin, maybe not, but its definitely something that needs a resolution. When checking traps, check: Are all your toilets full of water? Do you have any sinks or fixtures that are very ...


12

You've really got a two-step question here Would a lack of gutters and grading explain the water? The simple answer is yes. That's the source here. Even without gutters and proper grading, should the foundation walls still be water proof if they were constructed correctly? It's that second question that will get you. Your basement walls comprise an ...


11

If it rinsed down the drain and hasn't clogged yet then you're in fairly good shape. Clumping litter definitely can be saturated and breaks down. I'm assuming this is some sort of clay based litter (I use a pine based product myself) with fairly small granules and not a lot of stone. Also I'm presuming that you haven't been flushing the line out with ...


11

Yes it's normal and what you want. It's called a P-trap and the water sitting in there seals out the sewer gasses. My ASCII P-trap: \ / | | __________ | | _________ \ / / \*\__/*/ \****/ ---- The asterisks would be the water that forms the stopper. In an empty home ...


10

As others have suggested, a good excavator or even a landscape contractor might be able to find relatively simple ways to alter the landscape of your yard so that water will naturally flow away from the home. Civil engineer would be your best bet but they are also expensive enough that I see them as the last ditch effort if other measures have been failing. ...


8

I can't think of any reason why not - and in fact I'd recommend it. Right now your sump is draining water out right next to the house, which means its seeping back into the ground right against your foundation, which means your sump pump is ultimately pumping at lest some of the same water multiple times.


8

yes it stops the water from pooling at the base of the wall and seeping into the foundation if you can ensure all water goes into the drain there will be no danger though


8

First of all, it's a very good idea to get the water away from the house; in general you don't want any pooling or draining water around your foundation. The farther away you have sump pumps, eaves troughs, etc going, the better. You'll want to check the total discharge head of the pump before you do this. Pump performance is rated in terms of both volume (...


8

An unused drain or toilet will eventually dry out. The easy solution is to just run a little water periodically (on the order of every other month). If you still smell sewer gases, then you have a failure in the drain line somewhere. One common location is the wax seal under the toilet. You should also make sure nothing is nesting in the exhaust vent. That ...


8

It sounds like your dishwasher drain line is not installed correctly. You should have a loop so the drain line goes above the bottom of the sink before it goes to the dishwasher. Generally, the loop is attached to the bottom of the countertop itself. Without the loop, when water is draining from the sink, it will naturally flow down the dish washer line. If ...


8

I would take a 4-1/2" angle grinder with a diamond wheel and cut out the mortar between the bricks down level with the patio surface, at like 5-10 brick intervals, creating a path for the water to flow out. Then re-caulk the joint tapering the caulk at each "drain".


7

This is a tough one. There is no easy way to remedy your problem. The best way would be to remove and replace the tiles properly. If in fact the tiles are real marble, you can grind them to create the proper angle and slowly refinish the surface by stepping down grits and finally getting to a wet polish grit of 2400. That is actually impracticable for a DIY ...


7

Typically, a civil engineer is the person that designs drainage and landscape contouring. The excavators and landscape contractors follow the plan from the engineer. This is in a perfect world of course. But always in developments and large projects. In your small application, you might find qualified help from a larger excavating contractor that has civil ...


7

"What is considered an acceptable angle for a roof to ensure that there will be sufficient run-off during rain conditions?" Generally, minimum slope for water to run off is 1% (1/8" per 1'). However, minimum slope for a flat roof by building code here is 2%. (1/4" per 1'). You have more than enough slope for your roof, however you will likely need some ...


6

I don't think there is ever a "maximum" you can have on a horizontal run. Of course everything needs to have the required slope and you may not have enough vertical space to get it. The required slope depends on the size of the pipe. IPC table 704.1 shows that a pipe with an ID of 2.5" or less needs 1/4" per foot. While a pipe that is 3" to 6" only needs ...


6

You could try hiring an electric eel or get a plumber with a jetter But either of these options may still not work it the pipe is broken or snapped and the two sections of pipe are now ofset from one another. Even if these options do work to clear the pipe you still have to remember that the cause of the root problem is still there, cracked or broken ...


6

The usual purpose of a curtain drain is to divert (under)groundwater away from a structure. The only reason to not cover it with fabric and a few inches of soil is to capture surface drainage as well. If you need to capture surface drainage, then there must be a significant grading issue that is allowing surface water to stand near the structure. Such a ...


6

That's a drum trap, not a P-Trap. Be sure it's listed to comply with your code requirements. Looks slick anyway. You'll need a 45 degree chrome compression ell and maybe some extra pipe. You'll end up with the trap arm out of the drum running at a 45 degree horizontal angle to the wall. It will be cut quite short before it enters the ell. Upon exiting the ...


6

I'd suggest the following (apologies for the crude drawing). From left-to-right: extend pipe out past the black pipe attach yellow clean-out elbow (not 90 degree!...use a sweep (yellow)) this will be angled down aiming towards the run along the other wall connect the sweep to the other pipe using two 45 degree elbows (purple) Sweep with cleanout: 45 ...


6

The contractor should have busted up the top of the pool sides and cracked the concrete basically everywhere else. I have filled a few pools. We jackhammer the crap out of everything. There are holes punched every foot or two everywhere. You then totally chop off the first couple feet on the sides - especially on the downslope side to allow drainage. ...


6

I'm going to assume that there's not a trap inside the wall, but if I'm wrong please correct me. You're going to want to build a standpipe. Start by installing a P-trap into that pipe in the wall. It's hard to tell from the picture what type of pipe it is, but you'll want to use something compatible to make the connection between pipe and trap. From the ...


6

No. That is an absolute mess waiting to happen. Go to the hardware store, buy a longer tailpipe so you can lower the trap. Aim the pipe off of the trap for the drain you have that is lower than it should be. You can buy a proper trap that has nut fittings so you can remove it to clean hair, and jewelry out. You may have to cut a small hole in the vanity ...


5

You can install an interior weeping system similar to what you would normally do on the outside, but without the waterproofing. Start by jackhammering out about two feet of floor around the edges of your garage, as close to the walls as you can get. Dig down until you reach dirt, and if that's not at least two feet down, keep going. Now, put down a couple ...


5

Here's a VERY simple solution. I've had this problem for over a year and it's been driving me crazy. I finally found an incredibly simple solution, and it's especially good because I'm in an apartment where I'm not supposed to be "fixing" anything anyway. Take a scrap piece of wood and wedge it between the building and the pipe at or slightly above the ...


5

I found a pretty good way of stopping the noise. I cut some 5 mm thick rubber to the same width of the gutter then slid it in so it went just past the angle. It has poured down and they still run freely. So I hope this works for you.


5

I'm afraid it's probably both. You have a venting problem because the sinks gurgle. Watch the water level in a toilet when the washer starts to drain, it'll probably drop a little. The reason you don't have a bigger problem with water getting sucked out of traps is because the main line is obstructed, minimizing the demand for makeup air through the venting ...


5

EDIT: Comments above say that you have 1-2" of water. There is no solution for this other than fixing the drain. (Or going to marine style doors with a raised threshold.) What I've describe below can mitigate minor flooding, but won't help with the serious issue you seem to be having. ORIGINAL ANSWER: The proper long term answer is to fix the the drain....


5

You can, but it is considered an injection well and is regulated by law: In the United States, injection well activity is regulated by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and state governments under the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA). EPA has issued Underground Injection Control (UIC) regulations in order to protect drinking water ...


5

There are snakes designed for clearing clogs in a toilet. They typically have a 3-foot tube with a rubber piece on the end, and the spring part goes through the tube and the rubber piece. The rubber protects the toilet from being chipped or scratched by the snake. The type of snake talked about in your linked question are designed for use in cleanouts where ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible