52

OK I am going to answer this like you are in the US. It doesn't differ much but to give a baseline. To sum it up - This is F'ing crazy as hell, unsanitary, and not code. So it looks like there is a basin siphoned off from the foundation that drains to a sump pump and the pump pushes water to... who the hell knows (it doesn't matter). Issues: If ...


37

You don't have a trap seal, to prevent air from moving through the drain. Only the dishwasher is draining through the trap, so there's no trap to prevent air from coming up the drain. you'll have to fix the plumbing, so that both the sink and dishwasher use the trap. Instead, the plumbing should look more like this... Use a tailpiece like this, off the ...


34

It is doubtful the pH+ of rainwater anywhere, other than directly downwind of an erupting volcano, would be unsafe in terms of damaging plumbing fixtures or pipes. That said, there is concern in how the rainwater is stored. It must be kept so as not to be a breeding place for mosquitoes, toxic algae or other noxious critters, nor should the container cause ...


23

It's true that, so long as the exit is lower than the entrance, water will find its way through the pipe even if there are low points in the path. However, as others have noted, debris could accumulate in those low points. So the answer to your specific questions "does it need to be continuously sloped" is a squishy "yes.. unless you're ...


20

You need to be careful how much you impede the natural flow of water off your neighbor's yard. If your property is downhill of your neighbor's, the water flows naturally from his property to yours. You could find yourself in legal jeopardy if you dam up or otherwise prevent that natural flow. On the other side of the coin, your up-hill neighbor can not, ...


19

So put a drain channel along the edge of the fence - even a trench filled with gravel can help. Then create some raised beds where you can control the water ie humidity and it can help with pests as well.


16

If you are in a climate where the water can freeze it is a definite problem. If not, there is still the potential for debris and sediment to settle in the low sections and eventually clog the pipe.


15

I'd be tempted to poke that large white fitting on a piece of flexi hose with a stick o see if it's really a trap that is meant to be screwed to the bottom of the bath drain. It's hard to tell for sure, but that long dip tube on the plug hole fitment looks like it's meant to be screwed into something and my betting is that the 'something' fell off when ...


13

A small trench may not help, but most certainly a full-on dry well with some French Drain buried along the property boundary will do the trick. That's a lot of work, but it is the solution. Keep in mind that your low veggie garden will get flooded every time there's a serious rainstorm, due to the slope of the land. You might as well find a solution that ...


12

You've really got a two-step question here Would a lack of gutters and grading explain the water? The simple answer is yes. That's the source here. Even without gutters and proper grading, should the foundation walls still be water proof if they were constructed correctly? It's that second question that will get you. Your basement walls comprise an access ...


12

Yes, you can do this, but you must make sure that the supplies to the wc are separated from the rest of the supplies to the taps, showers etc. We planned this in the plumbing for our house so that we could easily separate the washing machine and 3 wc from the other items - plumber was not happy but we got what we wanted. That meant we only needed a simple ...


11

Your bathtub drains directly into a concrete sump pit; not "the wall" as such but a pit constructed for this purpose. In the US and Canada, open sumps are used only for groundwater, like from drains that prevent basement floording. It kinda looks like someone wanted to put a bathroom into a basement, cheap, and came up with the horrific but clever idea to ...


11

A quick and easy solution would be to get a 2" x 12" x 10' P.T.board and bury it a few inches into the ground along the fence and screw it into the bottom of the fence. You could extend it as far as you needed along the fence. Get a board rated for ground contact.


10

As others have suggested, a good excavator or even a landscape contractor might be able to find relatively simple ways to alter the landscape of your yard so that water will naturally flow away from the home. Civil engineer would be your best bet but they are also expensive enough that I see them as the last ditch effort if other measures have been failing. ...


9

It sounds like your dishwasher drain line is not installed correctly. You should have a loop so the drain line goes above the bottom of the sink before it goes to the dishwasher. Generally, the loop is attached to the bottom of the countertop itself. Without the loop, when water is draining from the sink, it will naturally flow down the dish washer line. If ...


9

You definitely shouldn't fix this yourself if you are renting and the landlord said it's good like this. But if you live in a place with sufficient regulation in the housing/renting market you can probably force you landlord to have it fixed for you. I bet this smells bad. Where I live a bad smell would be enough to be able to claw back some of the rent - ...


9

Rainwater is regularly captured and used by rural domestic properties here in New Zealand for everything in a typical household - from drinking to flushing toilets, with minimal treatment. Its pretty much the norm for people in rural locations (if you are a few miles outside a built up area, you wont have mains water or sewerage) - capture rainfall runoff ...


8

I would take a 4-1/2" angle grinder with a diamond wheel and cut out the mortar between the bricks down level with the patio surface, at like 5-10 brick intervals, creating a path for the water to flow out. Then re-caulk the joint tapering the caulk at each "drain".


7

"What is considered an acceptable angle for a roof to ensure that there will be sufficient run-off during rain conditions?" Generally, minimum slope for water to run off is 1% (1/8" per 1'). However, minimum slope for a flat roof by building code here is 2%. (1/4" per 1'). You have more than enough slope for your roof, however you will likely need some ...


7

Typically, a civil engineer is the person that designs drainage and landscape contouring. The excavators and landscape contractors follow the plan from the engineer. This is in a perfect world of course. But always in developments and large projects. In your small application, you might find qualified help from a larger excavating contractor that has civil ...


7

Your other option is to fit a short concrete post, and bolt the wooden post to it. It's more expensive, but the concrete won't rot when the hole fills with water. Around here they're often called a 'grandfather' but apparently the official name is a 'repair spur'


7

I have heavy clay that won’t drain. I dipped the end of my pressure treated posts in liquid asphalt (roofing material) and let them dry before cementing them in. 20 years, and they are still in pretty good shape.


6

That's a drum trap, not a P-Trap. Be sure it's listed to comply with your code requirements. Looks slick anyway. You'll need a 45 degree chrome compression ell and maybe some extra pipe. You'll end up with the trap arm out of the drum running at a 45 degree horizontal angle to the wall. It will be cut quite short before it enters the ell. Upon exiting the ...


6

I'd suggest the following (apologies for the crude drawing). From left-to-right: extend pipe out past the black pipe attach yellow clean-out elbow (not 90 degree!...use a sweep (yellow)) this will be angled down aiming towards the run along the other wall connect the sweep to the other pipe using two 45 degree elbows (purple) Sweep with cleanout: 45 ...


6

The contractor should have busted up the top of the pool sides and cracked the concrete basically everywhere else. I have filled a few pools. We jackhammer the crap out of everything. There are holes punched every foot or two everywhere. You then totally chop off the first couple feet on the sides - especially on the downslope side to allow drainage. ...


6

I'm going to assume that there's not a trap inside the wall, but if I'm wrong please correct me. You're going to want to build a standpipe. Start by installing a P-trap into that pipe in the wall. It's hard to tell from the picture what type of pipe it is, but you'll want to use something compatible to make the connection between pipe and trap. From the ...


6

No. That is an absolute mess waiting to happen. Go to the hardware store, buy a longer tailpipe so you can lower the trap. Aim the pipe off of the trap for the drain you have that is lower than it should be. You can buy a proper trap that has nut fittings so you can remove it to clean hair, and jewelry out. You may have to cut a small hole in the vanity ...


6

Sumps typically have standing water, as Jasen mentions, part of the reason of having them is a sediment trap to prevent debris from going into the storm drain. All that "compost" didn't end up in the storm drain. You also likely don't want that compost entering your pipe and possibly getting a clog. A deeper sump pit means you have to clean it out less ...


6

Your fix is to make like a Roman Aqueduct and support the lower "dips" so that the pipe runs at a more-consistent downward angle. This will also make the water flow faster, flushing possible sediments without a chance to block up. Aim for a straight run of pipe with the same drop over distance, rather than a specific angle. Start by supporting the ...


6

Any of the pipe hangers available at your local big-box home improvement store are designed to support a full pipe. They would be just decorations if they didn't... Pick a type that seems simplest to you to use, get appropriate fasteners (you're attaching this to concrete, a simple screw or nail isn't going to do the trick), ensure you've got the proper 1/4&...


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