35

This is NOT intended use It's way too much water for any intended use. To give you an idea, the last time I saw a $700 bill, it was from a toilet at a rarely-used facility, which had a stuck float. The valve was wide open 24x7 for 2 months. That's the kind of flow we're talking about. For a dishwasher to have that much flow, it would have to be ...


21

Re-wire the outlet so the top one is on the switch instead of the bottom one. Is this even possible, and if so, considering I've never done it before and it's under the kitchen sink without much room, how hard would this be? This should be very straightforward. There are actually two different configurations possible. Find the one or two breakers and turn ...


20

First, it's almost certainly not the fault of your dishwasher. A dishwasher has to physically pump the water out of it, and they really only hold enough water to fill the bottom. If it started to fill completely, the water would leak out all over the floor - the seals are not designed to hold back that kind of pressure. The problem is most likely a leak ...


15

It's called an insulation blanket and its main purpose is to muffle the noise made during operation. Since it's usually made of fiberglass, it provides some heat insulation too. You don't need it, but you'll probably find the extra noise to be annoying. Try the dishwasher without it, and if you can't live with the noise, replace it.


15

You have to pull the wire out. Period. What you're looking at here is the conduit wiring method. It's actually a very excellent way to run wiring, but I gather it's completely alien and unfamiliar to you. The gist is that you build the pipe route, then you run the wires through it, in that order. The wires can be any color and size you want. Now, Code ...


15

To just answer your question about how much water your dishwasher uses, unhook the drain tubing for the DW and stick it into a big bucket so you can catch the water as it drains out. You might need two buckets, one for wash and one for rinse. The drain tubing disconnect easily from a trap or the disposal. Once you get all the water in buckets, just scoop it ...


14

You can put the dishwasher wherever you want. You will have to provide it with water and a drain that meets code - and it's not at all likely that you can run 17 feet to join the sink drain while meeting code. So you'll have to arrange plumbing to serve the water input and drain output needs of the dishwasher where you want to put it, independent of the sink....


14

That metal cladding is a valid ground path, provided it is connected properly to a metal box with either a ground wire from the breaker panel connected to the metal box or the metal box connecting to metal conduit back to the breaker panel. Any actual ground wires involved (e.g., if one comes out from the dishwasher along with hot & neutral) should be ...


11

There are no requirements in National Electrical Code (NEC) that a residential disposal must be GFCI protected. However, there may be requirements in the installation instructions, which would make GFCI protection required. 210.8(A) requires receptacles serving the kitchen countertop to be GFCI protected. It also requires GFCI protection for receptacles ...


10

Dishwashers can be either hardwired, or cord-and-plug connected. Check the owners manual of the unit you have, but in most cases the decision is left to the installer. From a random Maytag Dishwasher Installation Guide (PDF) In newer homes you'll commonly find a 125V NEMA 5-15R receptacle supplied by a 20 ampere circuit, used to supply a dishwasher and ...


10

Purchase an appliance cord, at least 6' long. Route the power cable from the house for the dishwasher into the the under sink space. Install a electrical box and conventional receptacle on this power line. Fix it to the back wall of the sink base. Route the cord from the dish washer into the sink base together with the water lines. Plug this cord into the ...


10

Looks like you got about 3.5" to make up. I'd put a couple of 2x4s front to back stacked flat and screwed down where the DW feet go. My wife and I are both tall and when we built our house we decided on a 39" counter height, meaning we had to build up for the range and dishwashers. Worked fine. It also means not having to bend over the dishwasher ...


10

Congratulations on moving to the big city. Now, get familiar with big-city electrical. You'll see a lot of the metal conduit wiring method. This is an industrial-grade wiring system that is required where safety matters more, because more lives or property are at stake. They typically require it in multiple occupancy buildings, to reduce electrical fires. ...


9

For a hardwired appliance, either one of two things are true in order for the connection to comply with Code: The appliance provides a junction box on itself where the field wiring connections can be made, or The appliance provides a "whip" of cordage or wire-in-flex that has bare ends -- this is intended to be terminated in a field-installed junction box. ...


9

You don't. Let the dishwasher do it for you. I have read in a maintenance manual that the ideal temperature for incoming water to a dishwasher is 150F. Was it a maintenance manual for your actual dishwasher? If not, I would ignore random advice (no better than advice from some stranger on the internet...). Most dishwashers now automatically heat water as ...


9

There are products designed specifically for this, like this one: I haven't tried it - I actually have a kit but never got around to it... I definitely would not use tape because if it comes off during a wash cycle and clogs the drain you have a real mess. The racks (doesn't matter what brand) vary by model. Even when you can get replacements, the cost is a ...


8

The cover of the detergent cup is not opening when its supposed to. If you need to expose the cup to investigate, it is not opening at all. The spring loaded cover is held closed over the detergent by a little catch. There is a solenoid in the door that pulls on the catch, letting the cover spring open. This happens at the start of the main wash cycle. The ...


8

The blue plastic piece itself can't be replaced. The whole inlet valve needs to be replaced. Pretty sure it's this part which costs about $50. Not very familiar with taking apart dishwashers down that far but the appliances I have taken apart have been surprisingly easy. I've always found videos online that helped. This video looks like your dishwasher. ...


7

The Siemens SK26E220EU manual says: Water temperature: cold water preferred; hot water max. temperature 60 °C. Which appears to imply that it is fine so long as the hot water is no more than 60C at input. It includes a water softener, so it may well have some parts in the water path before it heats the water hotter that would be damaged by hotter water. ...


7

The green wire ends up connected to the chassis of the washer through the connector on the gray wire. If you'd open up the dishwasher you'd see one of the connectors going to a metal plate. If you have a multimeter/continuity tester you can test this by checking the continuity between one of the connectors where the grey cable plugs in at the dishwasher and ...


7

In the end, the solution was to tip the dishwasher backwards but at a far greater angle - about 60 degrees. This lead to a small amount of water running onto the floor and the problem was fixed.


6

Follow the manufacturer's instructions. New and higher priced dishwashers are more frequently starting to connect to cold water. The better dishwashers fill with so little water that the hot doesn't arrive anyway unless you let the sink water run like in the shower. Better energy efficient washers heat their own water to the proper temperature for better ...


6

GE dishwasher won’t drain. Washer is washing, but doesn’t drain. During drain cycle you hear a hum, but no water is flowing into the garbage disposal. Troubleshooting: Two common problems: 1. Drain hose is blocked at the garbage disposal or anti-siphon air gap connection. 2. Something is stuck in the drain pump so that the impeller blades can't turn. ...


6

Based on other answers and comments, I'm hoping I can provide some help by bringing together some of the relevant information into one answer. How it works As @user1289451 pointed out, the "screw" is technically a worm gear. However, instead of the threads on the worm turning a gear, it is advancing the band by engaging the slots and moving the band ...


6

Put the dishwasher drain line into the disposal. But that is NOT your air gap. There is a difference between an air gap and a trap. The output of the disposal has a trap, which is important. But you also need to have an air gap. A trap prevents sewer gas from escaping through the drain. An air gap prevents sewer water from coming into the dishwasher if the ...


6

It is in your interest to understand / measure the connectors on the dishwasher and your water supply to select the right hose adapter. Perhaps one of these lines will allow you to bridge the new dishwasher into the existing water lines; https://www.amazon.com/s?k=dishwasher+line If you are near a Home Depot or Lowe's try their websites as well. Let ...


6

If the undersink cabinet has a door, you don't need GFCI as of 2017 in letter. That from the horse's mouth. You also don't need it in spirit if the appliances are hardwired and grounded. Here's what I see. Dishwashers are a heavy draw because they heat water or dishes (to dry them). As such, the dishwasher takes more than 50% of circuit capacity and ...


6

that is a very large water bill. This size of leak could easily be in the pipes in the ground before they reach the units and after the meter. To test, turn off all the water outlets (normal situation & without any dishwashers or clothes washers running). Check your meter to see if its running or not. If not obviously running, record the value and come ...


6

I think your methodology is sound. You want to make sure the plug and outlet is accessible so putting it under the sink is the way to go. When you mount it be sure to secure it to a stud and away from anywhere that could be exposed to water. This means away from the shutoff valves and not directly under the sink supply connections. Cable straps will hold the ...


6

There are spring tabs on the left side of the fitting, against the mounting plate. As you suspected, squeeze them. You'll probably need a pliers to get them tight enough to the fitting to fit back through. Loosen the screw or press the tab to release it from the flex conduit.


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