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The best plan I saw suggested in another question was to get a second 12V based pump. Place (or adjust) it so its start sensor is higher than your AC-powered pump, and also connect the battery to a battery maintainer. You get several benefits: If the power goes out, the second pump will kick in when the water reaches it (which should be within about an inch ...


2

Based on all of the foam and sealant around the object and rust on the floor it seems like the previous owner (or current landlord if you are renting) had an issue which they did not want to address properly. You can start by cleaning up the object a bit by peeling or gently scraping it until it's more obvious as to what it is or start removing the paneling ...


2

It looks like you have a basement laundry room with cinder block walls. The vertical structure doesn't look like metal to me, more like fiberboard put up to hide a soil stack and other plumbing. With the shampoo and wash cloth hanging on the utility sink... Do you have a shower down there too? Either the plumbing hidden behind the fiberboard wall may be ...


2

Check the sump where the pump is located. It's likely getting a trickle of water from somewhere, filling very slowly until it trips the float switch and pumps the water out. You may have a leaky stool, water seepage from under the floor, a dripping faucet, a de/humidifier, or condensing furnace draining into it. Your next steps, if any, depend on where ...


2

I've bricked a few steel heat treating furnaces with asbestos bricks but never heard of asbestos mortar so I'd guess your safe there. It's crumbling a bit because it wasn't finished off correctly because it was in the attic. As far as the plaster, doesn't hurt to have it checked.


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You should have received an asbestos report when you purchased also lead paint. I have not seen asbestos in refractory cement or mortar , many times if needed the asbestos looked like thick white layers of cardboard, I see what looks like horse hair in the plaster, I have not found asbestos in horse hair plaster and lath but have heard that it was used so it ...


1

From a code perspective, I think you are OK so long as the square footage of the basement is less than 200 and there is adequate ventilation. I personally believe there is a safety concern though, but minor and something you could mitigate with ensuring smoke detectors are plentiful and fire extinguishers are readily available, but this is something people ...


1

The Code requires a minimum ceiling height of 7’-0” for habitable spaces, unless 1) it’s a slopped ceiling, 2) beams in ceilings 3) basement remodel, 4) bathroom or shower. 1) Slopped ceilings shall have at least 50% with at least 7’ height and slope down to no more than 5’. 2) Beams in ceilings spaces not less than 4’ on center, can drop down 6” below ...


1

My thought is have the stud flush with the concrete wall. Then use pine wood to create a box from the edge of the window frame to the finished drywall edge. Then put the trim on the drywall to frame it. Creates a window box ledge for fancy stuff to sit on.


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