6

Your proposed solution is perfect. I'd suggest using pressure treated wood in contact with the concrete. Adhesive probably won't work terribly well, but if you get a couple of screws in on an angle on the right (connecting to the old plate) plus lots of screws elsewhere, everything should hold together well enough to carry drywall.


2

In some locations you cannot connect the sewer to the sump system, I understand this is not the discharge but sewage can be in that drain and pumping it outside could Create a health hazard. I have installed back flow preventers in the past to keep back pressure from entering, these do have there own problems but stop the city system from filling your ...


1

There are several issues: 1) location of crack, 2) horizontal crack and small vertical crack, 3) seismic zone where you live, 4) form ties 1) The crack appears in the top portion of your foundation. This means it’s probably from freeze-thaw issues. (If the crack was in the lower half of the wall, it could indicate a weak foundation wall that could be ...


1

Given what looks like black mold on the lower portion of the other drywall I'd be tempted to cut a large rectangle. I'd probably opt for the paper free green board that can't mold. The sheet will be 4x8 so I'd pull back a 8' section along the bottom and cut it to the height of the current hole. Keep the drywall 1/4" off the concrete. Your plan for 2x4 ...


1

I don't know that there is a "perfect" way to insulate basement walls. When I built my house, 40+ years ago I did this: outside layer of foam board mastic (tar) on outside of block inside wall, 6 mil vapor barrier, taped fir studs, with high R board drywall I have not had moisture problems, but mileage will vary. One's biggest concern will be heat loss,...


1

It seems that your floor drain and your sump pump are not connected which is often the case due to building codes. The sump pit is designed so that any water that gets next to the foundation or under the floor (presumably concrete) will flow into the pit and collect until there is enough to trigger the pump switch which will then lift the water and expel it ...


1

I think you can do air/moisture/heat in one shot by using spray foam behind foam panels. Buy two cans of max-expansion spray foam. One may do, but it's best to have enough on hand. Cut 1-1/2" or 2" foam panel to fit each bay reasonably well. The plan is basically this: Spray a layer of foam on the mortar / set the foam panel in place / let the foam cure ...


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