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The one on the left appears to be a for a vanity sink. Though sinks usually connect to 1-1/2" pipe, anything below slab level is usually upsized to 2" for clog avoidance and easier cleaning. You'd reduce it above floor level. It's positioned to be either in the wall or in the cabinet. The center is the toilet. 4" stubs are often used so that ...


2

You're not going to (attempt to) drill through that I-beam to make a run for your wiring. Right? Good, don't attempt that. It looks like the duct hanger extends about 3/4 of the I-beam, and you'll be sorely tempted to have the bottom of the soffit right under the duct. However, a bit of an air gap significantly reduces the chances of some future person (...


2

Is there a reason why you need a 3-1/2" thick wall? If not, the studs could be rotated so the rough wall adds only 1-1/2" in front of the insulation/wrap. It seems that would make all the other problems melt away. You'd have to figure out what to do about top and bottom plates. You could rip a 2x4 in half and try to nail the studs to that, but it's ...


2

Aside from the need to land the circuit’s hot AND neutral on the AFCI breaker (or GFCI or A/GFCI), as ThreePhaseEel discusses, there’s another problem with this panel, so you might as well fix it now. One neutral per lug. Period. There are a small number of electricians who group each circuit’s neutral and ground together and stick them under the same screw ...


1

You don't want to apply a double barrier as this may result in the dreaded "moisture sandwich" inside the wall. Use unfaced batts. In fact I'd recommend rockwool over fiberglass for your use case due to its moisture resilience and easier working.


1

It is very hard to answer this question as it's like asking what is the going rate for a car? But to give you an idea of a semi-DIY job I did about 4 years ago for the exact size basement remodel but with all 6 walls concrete (below garage), it cost me about $3,000 in labor (framing + drywall + tile), including lumber and sheetrock. The framer was an ...


1

You need to move the neutrals for those circuits onto the breaker neutral lugs Many AFCI breakers, yours included, have a ground-fault trip in them, set at around 30mA, in order to catch arcs and other firestartingly hazardous leakages to ground. As a result, these AFCIs not only need their neutral pigtails connected to the neutral bus, they need the ...


1

Wow, looks like a problem (and one I've never dealt with). But I will venture what I would do: clean thoroughly with scrub brush and TSP spray insect poison deeply into each crack and crevice and let everything dry out seal all cracks and crevices with low-expansion spray foam paint all with waterproofing mopping sealant (like Redguard) pack with latex-...


1

There are a few issues here: 1) existing exterior concrete wall leaning, 2) location of French drain, 3) new wood wall installed to help existing concrete wall, 4) engineer designed, If the exterior wall is leaning in, it could be dangerous. If there are no cracks on the inside of the wall, then it’s probably not in danger of immediate collapse. However, ...


1

Vapor barriers are installed on the warm side in winter on walls. If you leave the vapor barrier in the middle of the insulation envelope, it will trap the moisture in the wall causing mold or dryrot or both. Vapor travels from a warm environment to a cool environment. When it reaches its dew point it changes from vapor to water. If this occurs in the middle ...


1

Your primary concern would be with any lead-containing coating beneath the Drylok. Your secondary consideration should be for silica. According to the CDC, an N95 is NOT adequate for lead dust, you need a P-100 or equivalent rating on your respirator. For airborne silica dust, an N95 is acceptable. So if you are relatively confidant that there isn't an old ...


1

I'll wager the two product styles address different needs. The sheet with the integral filter fabric installed facing the soil might work well in a soil that does tend to get saturated with water. It provides a drainage channel for that water to run down, rather than build pressure against the foundation wall. The sheet with no filter, installed so the ...


1

Neither your Option #1 nor your Option #2 are ideal. Note: Mastic on the wall is used to keep moisture OUT of the wall, not the HDPE membrane. Note: The HDPE membrane is used to provide an air gap at the wall so moisture can drain DOWN the wall. It eliminates hydrostatic pressure so moisture is not forced in through the wall causing a leak. Your Option #1: ...


1

We often design and build “safe rooms” in custom homes. Safe rooms have several requirements: 1) structurally secure, 2) fire protection, 3) temperature and humidity control, You are requesting information about fire protection only. However, it might be important to have a space that can protect you structurally in case of a severe wildfire AND keep ...


1

The Code requires a minimum ceiling height of 7’-0” for habitable spaces, unless 1) it’s a slopped ceiling, 2) basement remodel, 3) bathroom or shower. (See ICC R304.1) Slopped ceilings shall have at least 50% with at least 7’ and slope down to no more than 5’. Basements can have 6’-8” ceilings in non-habitable spaces. Not more than 75% of a sloped ...


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