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If you do use a rag or cloth temporary plug do not forget to remove it before you set the new toilet. Many times when replacing the flooring in a bathroom it will be a different thickness than the old flooring / sub flooring being replaced. In these instances it can be beneficial to cut back the toilet drain pipe and install a new toilet flange that will ...


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I think that you should focus on the cause not the symptom. So, what causes the toilet to overflow? Is it a filling valve issue? have you checked? Is the drain partially blocked? Once you sort that then the floor should be fine.


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Before trying to move a stuck shut off valve, determine how to shut off the water to your home or apartment. This is the main shut off valve. It also may be stuck, so you might want to try shutting off the water before proceeding. To free a stuck shut off valve, first try opening the valve a little more, then try closing it. The back-and-forth motion may ...


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That is a Kohler "canister style" flush valve. First, carefully remove the "rim-clean/bowl-fill" water supply hose (the little black hose that runs from your fill valve to the flush valve. Also, remove the chain that attaches the trip lever to the flush valve. To get at the gasket in question (which is very likely, but not 100% certainly, your problem) ...


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I usually use an adjustable spanner to hold the body of the valve when tightening, or loosening, any valve. This saves so much hassle as the supply pipe does not get kinked or its joint disturbed. A good tip from the OP in the comments is to remove the knob as this permits a better purchase. I use the type of adjustable spanner with flat parallel jaws ...


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To be it sounds like the back flow preventer on multi story building is partially blocked open. Or a venting issue. The easiest is to check the main vent stack and make sure it is clear. I have found main vent stacks that had construction cloth covers blocked with spider Webb’s enough to cause problems, in another case a dead squirrel, and several others ...


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The geometry of the toilet bowl itself determines the water level, so it’s not adjustable. Try adding water with a bucket and you will see the surface area return to where it was designed to be. The flush action is designed to get as much force out of the six liters of water as possible, so there will be turbulence. I recommend closing the lid before ...


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If its going to be for a few days and you are living in the house I would recommend a Plug like this: https://www.homedepot.com/p/CHERNE-Econ-O-Grip-4-in-Plug-271543/203308165 They are great and will create a water tight seal. so if there was any issues with a clog further down the line it won't over flow though the plug. And as Michael said, check your ...


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Try spraying a little WD-40 where the stem goes into the housing. Those valves get "stuck" when not being used for a while so you can turn it harder. Remember, turn it clockwise to turn the water off.


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I was able to get a piece of plastic like this out of the siphon jet by feeding a curved piece of thin wire around the object at the siphon jet entrance. After a few adjustments on the wire bend, I was able to get the end of the wire around the object and back out the siphon jet hole where I could grab the end of the wire with needle nose pliers. With the ...


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Keep in mind that you will need to do something about the output side of the bidet valve, and that's not as simple as it seems. You can use a 3/8" tee connected to a standard toilet supply line that then connects to the bidet valve, but the, you will also need a plug for the female side of the valve. Another option would be to not use a 3/8" compression ...


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You should be able to do what you propose because the adapter/valve that came with the unit does not appear to have any sort of pressure regulator built into it, meaning it appears to be designed for normal household pressure (btw this is not the case with all hand-held sprayer units). Because the consequences of failure could be catastrophic (e.g. flooded ...


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That 6’ run cannot be horizontal - it needs to slope, so either the wall end has to drop or the toilet end needs to be higher. Your locality will specify the amount of slope in the regulations, however, some I have seen have a drop of about 6” across that distance. If the slope is too shallow, then things get stuck...


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