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36

This is a load-bearing I-beam. This beam is holding up your house, so as long as it's well secured, you should be able to add an extra 80 lbs to it. They make mounting brackets specifically for hanging heavy bags onto these: http://amzn.to/2iXojjG


27

The clips that you are referring to are called snap rings in North America.


25

That is called a "circlip" and can be removed or positioned with special pliers made for them. They come in internal and external varieties. What you have pictured are internal. Some circlip pliers are reversible (the ones in the picture) so you can use them with internal or external circlips.


23

Your beam ends in the middle of the room, being supported by a post. This is weird and atypical. I am afraid only the person who implemented this solution could speak of it's purpose and strength. Usually, I-beams like this are the toughest part of the house, however in your setup it's mounting looks super-flimsy. I am afraid that the punching bag is the ...


18

A hole saw. Nice and round, complete with a center hole.


18

Stainless steel is the obvious choice. Which exact grade is probably more dependent on what you can easily find than what the "most perfect for the job" grade might be, but 316 or 316L would be high on the list and are quite commonly available. Be very careful about ventilating the tank if entering it "for maintenance" - tanks can be deadly. If the water ...


16

Seriously: You just don't. Reasons: You'll never be able to guarantee you didn't contaminate the fuel unless you clean it thorougly after the work, which you cannot with all the diesel in there. That bears great (financial) risks. If you sell that stuff you might even get sued. Special drills and precautions will surely reduce that risk, but it will still ...


15

The metal that you are detecting is probably the metal studs that are in each corner of the column. From the picture it looks like that column is also sheathed in drywall and so there may very well be a metal corner strip along each vertical edge as well. The metal studs width are typically going to be 3.5 inches. The drywall thickness from the adjoining ...


13

You don't want to "drill" a 1" hole in 3mm sheet. Without support the edge would be ragged and other problems would occur, such as fragments dropping into the tank. The best approach is probably to use an annular grinder. They are used for putting holes in tile and glass. Search for "diamond hole saw" on Amazon. Use a lot of water to cool it and the slowest ...


12

This stuff is sick: http://www.evapo-rust.com/ I used it on a drill press my buddy left out on a patio in the rain for a year. Virtually no scrubbing. I don't understand how this is not one of the most widely known products in the world. It is THAT good. I guess with the military as a client, they don't need the business from the public. Here are some ...


12

Put them in the grill and get them HOT! Then use a wire brush and scrub the scale and rust off. After that I usually coat them with olive oil but any cooking oil will work.


11

After cutting the bolt to length, use a stationary grinder instead of a file to clean up your work. With a grinder, it's easy to square up the end of the bolt and apply the chamfer that you want. Just be careful, especially if the bolt is shorter than the grinder's table. If the bolt is short, use a pair of vice grips to hold the bolt during grinding. And ...


10

A knockout punch is typically capable of going through thicker metal - at the very least, it will do it faster. A quick search easily finds knock-out punches that can do 10 gauge steel, where most step bits don't seem like they'd do well beyond 16 gauge (though I can't find anything that really says the limit). For thin metal though, the step drill bit is ...


10

I have played with various fire pit options in my backyard for 15 years. I have tons and tons of trees and yard waste and try to burn most or turn it into compost. I have grabbed the saucers from trash piles and used those - can't put much on there and wind blows stuff off easy. I have had an enclosed mini-chimney pit I built from stones. This worked ...


9

There are several online metal suppliers that will also make custom cuts. Online Metals is one that I have used. There is a minimum length that you must order (usually 1 ft) and a charge per cut. Depending on where you live you might also find a local metal supplier that can do the same for you. Wherever you order, I'd suggest you get two 5" pieces ...


9

The internal bowl/barrel of an old washing machine works well for an above-ground solution - the holes around the sides allow the embers to breathe well and help to radiate heat. You can add legs as this person has, or simply prop it up on a slab or some bricks. Just make sure that it IS metal - a lot of the newer/cheaper washing machines use plastic ...


9

It looks like you have two things going on with this You have a large opening in your basement. If you look to the left side of your first photo, you can see what looks like framing for a doorway. That framing is picking up the load of the floor joists above it. But your I-beam is probably spanning a much larger opening (maybe 15 to 20 feet). That I-beam is ...


9

For a hole of that size or larger a hole saw might be an easier method as it removes less material and may be more likely to stay centered due to its pilot bit. However using the more standard bit you have is working and you should be able to get all the way through. The type of vibration and unevenness of the hole from that type of bit is not uncommon in ...


9

Should I try to cut out so both the existing and the new drywall will touch half of the metal stud on each side? And put in screws on both sides? Yes that is an effective way to do it. Another way is to add a board, 1"x4" boards work great, as structure to screw to. Clean up your hole so the cuts are straight and at 90 degrees to each other so you ...


8

You have the basics down pat. The key to getting the threads working properly is: Squaring off the thread end of the bolt. Yes, the hacksaw blade will follow the threads slightly. If you have a bandsaw with a stock holding vise that can be squared to the blade, run a single nut on so the hexes will hold the bolt in place as straight to the blade as ...


8

As Karl recommends, drilling dry with a metal drill bit (HSS or Carbide) is the basic information that you need. As far as drilling speed goes, you can refer to a cutting speed chart and do a bit of math. Aluminum's cutting speed is 350-400 fpm or 106,680-121,920 mm/minute. The distance travelled by a point on the outermost edge of the bit during one ...


8

Drill dry. You need a carbide tipped bit that's rated for metal; this will be obvious on the outside of the packaging. I'd drill fast.


8

You can make watertight trays from flat sheet metal without soldering or riviting. Take a sheet of metal whose length is the length of the finished tray plus two time the height of the sides; width is the width of the finished tray plus two time the height of the sides. Fold the sheet so it ends up looking like this: You can fold up one side at a time ...


8

I believe that is called a spring pin anchor or express nail To remove it, I'd try these: or any nail puller. Spraying some Liquid Wrench or other light lubricant might make it easier to pull out, but also slippery to hold onto, and might make an oily rusty stain.


7

Based on the clarifications, I would recommend using a reusable thread-locking liquid. Here is a link to one I found that may work. I have not used it. Vibra-Tite VC3 Threadmate http://www.vibra-tite.com (I am in no way affiliated with the Vibra-Tite Company)


7

I would use a punch to make a small dent in the pole so my drill bit wouldn't slip.


7

Soak them overnight in vinegar. It works like magic to remove rust. Afterwards rub them with oil or they will get rusty again.


7

Excellent electrolysis results: You need: One rusty grill grate. A plastic container. Some DC power source. An iron plate (NB pure iron, NOT stainless steel!). Sodium hydroxide, NaOH (alternatively sodium carbonate, Na2CO3). Rubber gloves. Instructions: Put the grill grate inside the container making sure that it is not lying flat on the bottom but have ...


6

You're using the wrong type of screws. It should be a #7 Pan-Head And Not the self tapping. The self tapping is good for thicker metal studs but the the sharp tip works best for those angle shots you're having trouble with. Use #8 self tapping for the tougher thicker steel studs


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