The Stack Overflow podcast is back! Listen to an interview with our new CEO.
46

Yes! the tool is called a caulk gun. Use the spout cutter for cutting off the tip of the tube; then use the seal punch tool for poking holes in the foil seal.


31

Wood glue, hands down. Wood glue is designed to penetrate the wood for a tighter bond. Properly done, wood glue is stronger than the surrounding wood. I have chairs I've wood glued and clamped and they're still fine years later. Epoxy is OK, but you have to make sure you get the right epoxy too. Many are exothermic (they get hot) and might eat your wood. ...


17

Yes, but not just for rigidity. Cement board is made of, well, cement - and cement is brittle. When you screw the cement board in you create a pressure point or stress point. Even though the board is screwed in with lots and lots of screws, each screw hole is a stress point prone to breakage. By gluing the board as well as screwing, you ensure that a ...


10

1) Use an 81" length of metal with a 'T' cross section. Cut a slot down the middle of the 81" edge of the panel to accommodate it. Dry fit, then assemble with construction adhesive. If desired, 'pin' the T-bar in place with nails or screws through the surface of the door. ... or ... 2) Use an 81" length of metal with a 'U' cross section and 1.5" outside ...


10

I would spend the time to scrape it off. This will increase the contact area between the studs and the drywall, which in turn will give better stability. Stability is important because if there is any free play, the screws will move, and may eventually show through the paint. There are various scrapers available in your local home improvement store, in the ...


8

Removing glue from any surface is a thankless task. You will not be able to return the floor to an as-built state. You're going to have to cover it with something. You're going to have to dissolve it and scrape it. And it's going to be a heck of job. Some expert google-fu has yielded Baby Oil as a potential solvent. Other suggestions were mineral oil. ...


8

If you want to use wood glue again, I'd remove the old glue. You'll get a stronger bond if you apply glue to clean wood. A belt sander would do a nice job. If you're ok using urethane glue or project adhesive, the only concern is whether the replaced board will sit above the others. Otherwise I'd have no problem bonding to the old glue if it appears solid. ...


7

I had liquid nails all over my walls for my steps leading downstairs after I tore out the fake brick. I am more than sure that the above answers will work but I like free and I like hitting things. Tools needed: sharp chisel and hammer. Time it took me to do entire stairs: about 1 hour. Procedure: Just keep the chisel flat so it doesn't take out any ...


7

From the Liquid Nails faq: How To Remove LIQUID NAILS Adhesive Products from Building Materials In general, LIQUID NAILS construction adhesive and caulk products can be scraped off when they are softened either by: Heating above 140°F with an electric heat gun or blow dryer Coating the adhesive with petroleum jelly or mineral spirits for ...


7

Tape and concrete don't really mix that well. It might initially hold, but it will eventually let go. The best solution is to drill a hole and use a light concrete anchor or concrete nail. Alternatively, you can use a special metal band that wraps the pole and has an attachment on it (sorry, I don't know the exact name of these) - they are often use for ...


7

You have a dilemma. The strongest removable glue bases hooks, such as Command, appear to be rated to to hold a maximum of only 7.5 lbs. Even if you double these up, you are at 15 lbs. It might be possible to rig a series of hooks to spread the load, but it would take a careful rigging to avoid having all the weight on the two outside hooks. This is not a ...


6

I have had success sawing through them with dental floss. Get an 18" piece of floss. wrap each end around your fingers or a pencil. Slide the floss behind the plastic section. while applying a downward pressure on the floss, move it back and forth left to right until the hook separates from the adhesive. Once you have access to the adhesive you can scrape it ...


6

You could try out this idea near the wall


6

To answer your questions: "Why doesn't duct tape work for cables? Is it the fault of plasticizers? " - No -- it is more likely that exposure to air dries the glue, causing it to eventually lose its tack and become unstuck. This is also the reason that you're often left with sticky residue, as air was unable to penetrate to the underside of the glue. "Does ...


6

If there is a lot of glue I would definitely spend the money on an oscillating tool and get one of the cutting tools. It should make quick work of getting the glue off but won't be as aggressive/damaging as a reciprocating saw.


6

I highly recommend against attempting to repair a tank that handles compressed air at over 100 PSI. Failure could be impressive and catastrophic. None of the liquid repairs designed for fuel tanks or tires are in any way appropriate, and a full reconditioning is not cost-effective. fred_dot_u is correct that the damage was caused by internal moisture. The ...


6

I did something similar on a smaller area. I used some plastic tools - scrapers etc and some cement remover product. The cement remover product has an acid base (stings like xxxx if you have an open cut...), but I only applied it to small areas (used a cotton bud) and never to the joints between the tiles you want to keep. If you don’t have patience at ...


6

Wood glue, always. Sandpaper the dowel and hole to give a better surface for the glue to hold.


5

The bubble doesn't necessarily mean it wasn't glued, but rather that air became trapped under the vinyl while it was being put down - which means that the people putting it down didn't do it properly. When installing vinyl, it should be unrolled slowly, with even pressure being applied along the length of the floor as it's being unrolled (slow, tedious work)...


5

I'm sorry for the delay but wanted to provide an update. When the dance floor was removed, there was a heavy amount of liquid nails covering about 500 sq ft. We had to remove it in order to lay new tile. We tried chipping it, which worked but took a lot of time. The best approach was purchasing a bottle of adhesive remover from Home Depot-- it's stated ...


5

I would use a two part epoxy for a permanent install. The only way you're getting it off is to chip away the underlying tile. Construction adhesive such as PL400 would also work. It's used to glue concrete pavers together when building a wall. However, it can become brittle over time and break off. If your attachments are ceramic as well, then the ...


5

You should not do this. Foam insulation (EPS, XPS, etc.) needs to be covered with drywall in order to protect it (extend the amount of time before it melts) from fire. Otherwise you are risk of being exposed to toxic fumes and melting foam should you ever have a fire. Imagine molten foam dripping from your ceiling onto you - not a situation you want to find ...


5

Open Time* The amount of time the adhesive should be left to set, before it is covered. If you're gluing two sticks together, with an adhesive with 30 seconds open time. You should apply the glue to one stick, then wait at least 30 seconds before affixing the second stick. The amount of time the adhesive can be left before it is covered. If you're ...


5

If they aren't level, and scraping is too daunting, I suggest sistering new studs to the existing ones but have them stick out 1/8 inch. I'd suggest using metal ones as that'd make the job extremely quick.


5

A good drywall adhesive has much more shear strength than screws - and this is just when your glue is on the framing. So if you are doubling up the drywall gluing makes a ton of sense. Just recently my drywall guys started using glue and I can say this, I hope I never have to demo these places because the drywall is ATTACHED. All this being said the ...


5

Silicone caulk or silicone RTV (Room Temperature Vulcanizing) glue (pretty much the same thing with different labels.) Sticks pretty well, moisture helps it cure, and it can be peeled off when you want it gone.


5

Wood glue works well; when cured it can flex a little as can wood itself. Epoxies tend to be rather brittle. Epoxies vary a lot: slower epoxies (e.g. Araldite Precision) are (i) much less exothermic, and (ii) liquid for long enough to soak in a little. They need the parts to be held stably together during curing. They should be stronger than fast epoxies ...


5

Wood glue, but not for the reason why you ask. In terms of long-term stability, the observable difference is exactly zero. There is no force acting on the dowel, and there is no exposure to water to be expected. You could probably stick the dowel in with a bit of spit and dirt, and it would do. Still wood glue is the correct thing to use. Wood glue is non-...


4

Gorilla glue makes a non-toxic PVC cement.


4

Unfortunately forever is simply impossible ;) Without knowing what/how these planks are going to be used, it is difficult to provide a great answer. I have no real experience with liquid nail, but have used similar types of glue with success, but again, without the what/how you indeed to use these planks... I can't say too much for your case. One issue ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible