47

Yes! the tool is called a caulk gun. Use the spout cutter for cutting off the tip of the tube; then use the seal punch tool for poking holes in the foil seal.


31

Wood glue, hands down. Wood glue is designed to penetrate the wood for a tighter bond. Properly done, wood glue is stronger than the surrounding wood. I have chairs I've wood glued and clamped and they're still fine years later. Epoxy is OK, but you have to make sure you get the right epoxy too. Many are exothermic (they get hot) and might eat your wood. ...


31

Slightly contrarian take: start over. (I know, you've done a bunch of work, etc. They call it the sunk-cost fallacy for a reason. Strong butt joints in the rail are possible but hard and would involve a ton of wood filler afterwards.) Get another door. Rough cut next to the hinge stile (but not cutting off the molding on the stile). Extract the panels and ...


18

As I've posted before, the risks of asbestos exposure on a very infrequent basis in a residential setting are highly over-blown. The real risks were for construction workers (pipe insulators, HVAC insulators, etc. ), back 50-60 years ago who where exposed to asbestos dust on a daily basis. I know the lawyers will hate me for saying this, but frankly ...


10

I would spend the time to scrape it off. This will increase the contact area between the studs and the drywall, which in turn will give better stability. Stability is important because if there is any free play, the screws will move, and may eventually show through the paint. There are various scrapers available in your local home improvement store, in the ...


10

If not making new panels, make or purchase an H shaped moulding and set the panel halves into it. By eyeball (but measuring tape may say otherwise) the top panel parts might be pulled out and rotated to provide similar "tie-in" as a new panel would, with that new H shaped moulding running horizontally, if the sizes work out. Too late now, but had ...


9

When I am redoing a bathroom and adding the needed backer board to a subfloor assembly, I would remove all existing finish floors no matter how many to get back down to the original subfloor. Then evaluate that, repair it if needed, add to it if needed to make it stiff enough for tile, then add the one layer of 1/4" backer board, then the heating wires, ...


9

There are many tension rods on the market that are expandable to fit a regular shower. They don't require any screws or adhesive. A screw mechanism in the rod holds the rod in place after tightening. Just a thought.


8

If you want to use wood glue again, I'd remove the old glue. You'll get a stronger bond if you apply glue to clean wood. A belt sander would do a nice job. If you're ok using urethane glue or project adhesive, the only concern is whether the replaced board will sit above the others. Otherwise I'd have no problem bonding to the old glue if it appears solid. ...


8

A "decent surface area" would lead me to drill and pin it using some metal dowels as well as using glue. That should help spread the stress caused by using it and make the repair last longer.


8

Wood and water are a poor mix. There is a really good reason that you do not see show enclosures made out of wood. It is also the reason that you will not find much in the way of wood shelves for use in showers. When wood is used in showers and steam rooms for benches and shelves the wood of choice is teak. If you are bound and determined to put maple wood ...


6

If there is a lot of glue I would definitely spend the money on an oscillating tool and get one of the cutting tools. It should make quick work of getting the glue off but won't be as aggressive/damaging as a reciprocating saw.


6

Open Time* The amount of time the adhesive should be left to set, before it is covered. If you're gluing two sticks together, with an adhesive with 30 seconds open time. You should apply the glue to one stick, then wait at least 30 seconds before affixing the second stick. The amount of time the adhesive can be left before it is covered. If you're gluing ...


6

I highly recommend against attempting to repair a tank that handles compressed air at over 100 PSI. Failure could be impressive and catastrophic. None of the liquid repairs designed for fuel tanks or tires are in any way appropriate, and a full reconditioning is not cost-effective. fred_dot_u is correct that the damage was caused by internal moisture. The ...


6

I did something similar on a smaller area. I used some plastic tools - scrapers etc and some cement remover product. The cement remover product has an acid base (stings like xxxx if you have an open cut...), but I only applied it to small areas (used a cotton bud) and never to the joints between the tiles you want to keep. If you don’t have patience at ...


6

Wood glue, always. Sandpaper the dowel and hole to give a better surface for the glue to hold.


6

For a curved rod, with its substantial torque load (twisting force), not much short of epoxy or urethane will hold reliably. I just wouldn't do it since removing those things from tile would be a chore and may result in surface damage. Wall tile is often soft with a very thin glaze. One other option might be to mount a bracket or plate above or alongside ...


5

You should not do this. Foam insulation (EPS, XPS, etc.) needs to be covered with drywall in order to protect it (extend the amount of time before it melts) from fire. Otherwise you are risk of being exposed to toxic fumes and melting foam should you ever have a fire. Imagine molten foam dripping from your ceiling onto you - not a situation you want to find ...


5

If they aren't level, and scraping is too daunting, I suggest sistering new studs to the existing ones but have them stick out 1/8 inch. I'd suggest using metal ones as that'd make the job extremely quick.


5

I would use a two part epoxy for a permanent install. The only way you're getting it off is to chip away the underlying tile. Construction adhesive such as PL400 would also work. It's used to glue concrete pavers together when building a wall. However, it can become brittle over time and break off. If your attachments are ceramic as well, then the ...


5

A good drywall adhesive has much more shear strength than screws - and this is just when your glue is on the framing. So if you are doubling up the drywall gluing makes a ton of sense. Just recently my drywall guys started using glue and I can say this, I hope I never have to demo these places because the drywall is ATTACHED. All this being said the ...


5

Silicone caulk or silicone RTV (Room Temperature Vulcanizing) glue (pretty much the same thing with different labels.) Sticks pretty well, moisture helps it cure, and it can be peeled off when you want it gone.


5

Wood glue works well; when cured it can flex a little as can wood itself. Epoxies tend to be rather brittle. Epoxies vary a lot: slower epoxies (e.g. Araldite Precision) are (i) much less exothermic, and (ii) liquid for long enough to soak in a little. They need the parts to be held stably together during curing. They should be stronger than fast epoxies ...


5

Wood glue, but not for the reason why you ask. In terms of long-term stability, the observable difference is exactly zero. There is no force acting on the dowel, and there is no exposure to water to be expected. You could probably stick the dowel in with a bit of spit and dirt, and it would do. Still wood glue is the correct thing to use. Wood glue is non-...


5

It seems like the "trail and error" approach is not smart. I like the suggestion to request prop 65 MSDS for the part, if there is one available. Best practical suggestion came from elsewhere: apply a tiny test patch where it won't show and won't affect the joint, just to see if the selected glue/solvent/expoxy will bond. If the test patch works, then ...


5

I would definitely not even try the adhesive approach for mounting a curved shower curtain rod. I have seen so many of these now popular rods that were so poorly secured that they were sagging a good six to eight inches or about to fall down. Especially seen in motel rooms or b&b type rentals. In almost all cases they are using small mount points similar ...


5

Just about any 2 part epoxy would meet your requirements. However, gluing both sides is asking for trouble in the future. Couple of ways around this. You could use loctite blue (thanks @jwh20 for steering us away from red) on the grub screws, which would be reversible but more secure than your current setup. You could lightly dimple the axle with a drill bit ...


5

A high quality construction adhesive should do the trick. The gap looks wide enough that you should be able to get the nozzle of the adhesive tube between the door and the mirror. Apply the adhesive around the perimeter of the door behind the mirror, Clamp the mirror to the door until the adhesive is set. Be sure to wipe off any excess adhesive that seeps ...


4

1) Heat gun - use a blow dryer or heat gun to soften the solution up. 2) Acetone - apply acetone to the spot. This will not penetrate the metal on the radiator. 3) Scrape - You can use an old t-shirt, stick the metal scraper inside the t-shirt and start chipping/smoothing away at the spot. Repeat until it gets almost level with the radiator. You probably ...


4

In most cases, a silicone based glue would adhere fairly well to most tiles. On smooth tiles it can be removed with a razor blade. On rougher tiles, a blade and a wire brush can get it off. The tiles need to be thoroughly cleaned before using (as with any glue). This is not as strong a bond as epoxy or construction adhesive, as suggested by Chris Cudmore, ...


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