47

Yes! the tool is called a caulk gun. Use the spout cutter for cutting off the tip of the tube; then use the seal punch tool for poking holes in the foil seal.


31

Wood glue, hands down. Wood glue is designed to penetrate the wood for a tighter bond. Properly done, wood glue is stronger than the surrounding wood. I have chairs I've wood glued and clamped and they're still fine years later. Epoxy is OK, but you have to make sure you get the right epoxy too. Many are exothermic (they get hot) and might eat your wood. ...


31

Slightly contrarian take: start over. (I know, you've done a bunch of work, etc. They call it the sunk-cost fallacy for a reason. Strong butt joints in the rail are possible but hard and would involve a ton of wood filler afterwards.) Get another door. Rough cut next to the hinge stile (but not cutting off the molding on the stile). Extract the panels and ...


18

As I've posted before, the risks of asbestos exposure on a very infrequent basis in a residential setting are highly over-blown. The real risks were for construction workers (pipe insulators, HVAC insulators, etc. ), back 50-60 years ago who where exposed to asbestos dust on a daily basis. I know the lawyers will hate me for saying this, but frankly ...


10

1) Use an 81" length of metal with a 'T' cross section. Cut a slot down the middle of the 81" edge of the panel to accommodate it. Dry fit, then assemble with construction adhesive. If desired, 'pin' the T-bar in place with nails or screws through the surface of the door. ... or ... 2) Use an 81" length of metal with a 'U' cross section and 1.5" outside ...


10

I would spend the time to scrape it off. This will increase the contact area between the studs and the drywall, which in turn will give better stability. Stability is important because if there is any free play, the screws will move, and may eventually show through the paint. There are various scrapers available in your local home improvement store, in the ...


10

If not making new panels, make or purchase an H shaped moulding and set the panel halves into it. By eyeball (but measuring tape may say otherwise) the top panel parts might be pulled out and rotated to provide similar "tie-in" as a new panel would, with that new H shaped moulding running horizontally, if the sizes work out. Too late now, but had ...


9

When I am redoing a bathroom and adding the needed backer board to a subfloor assembly, I would remove all existing finish floors no matter how many to get back down to the original subfloor. Then evaluate that, repair it if needed, add to it if needed to make it stiff enough for tile, then add the one layer of 1/4" backer board, then the heating wires, ...


9

There are many tension rods on the market that are expandable to fit a regular shower. They don't require any screws or adhesive. A screw mechanism in the rod holds the rod in place after tightening. Just a thought.


8

Removing glue from any surface is a thankless task. You will not be able to return the floor to an as-built state. You're going to have to cover it with something. You're going to have to dissolve it and scrape it. And it's going to be a heck of job. Some expert google-fu has yielded Baby Oil as a potential solvent. Other suggestions were mineral oil. ...


8

If you want to use wood glue again, I'd remove the old glue. You'll get a stronger bond if you apply glue to clean wood. A belt sander would do a nice job. If you're ok using urethane glue or project adhesive, the only concern is whether the replaced board will sit above the others. Otherwise I'd have no problem bonding to the old glue if it appears solid. ...


8

A "decent surface area" would lead me to drill and pin it using some metal dowels as well as using glue. That should help spread the stress caused by using it and make the repair last longer.


8

Wood and water are a poor mix. There is a really good reason that you do not see show enclosures made out of wood. It is also the reason that you will not find much in the way of wood shelves for use in showers. When wood is used in showers and steam rooms for benches and shelves the wood of choice is teak. If you are bound and determined to put maple wood ...


7

You have a dilemma. The strongest removable glue bases hooks, such as Command, appear to be rated to to hold a maximum of only 7.5 lbs. Even if you double these up, you are at 15 lbs. It might be possible to rig a series of hooks to spread the load, but it would take a careful rigging to avoid having all the weight on the two outside hooks. This is not a ...


7

I had liquid nails all over my walls for my steps leading downstairs after I tore out the fake brick. I am more than sure that the above answers will work but I like free and I like hitting things. Tools needed: sharp chisel and hammer. Time it took me to do entire stairs: about 1 hour. Procedure: Just keep the chisel flat so it doesn't take out any ...


7

From the Liquid Nails faq: How To Remove LIQUID NAILS Adhesive Products from Building Materials In general, LIQUID NAILS construction adhesive and caulk products can be scraped off when they are softened either by: Heating above 140°F with an electric heat gun or blow dryer Coating the adhesive with petroleum jelly or mineral spirits for ...


6

Gorilla glue makes a non-toxic PVC cement.


6

You could try out this idea near the wall


6

To answer your questions: "Why doesn't duct tape work for cables? Is it the fault of plasticizers? " - No -- it is more likely that exposure to air dries the glue, causing it to eventually lose its tack and become unstuck. This is also the reason that you're often left with sticky residue, as air was unable to penetrate to the underside of the glue. "Does ...


6

Open Time* The amount of time the adhesive should be left to set, before it is covered. If you're gluing two sticks together, with an adhesive with 30 seconds open time. You should apply the glue to one stick, then wait at least 30 seconds before affixing the second stick. The amount of time the adhesive can be left before it is covered. If you're gluing ...


6

If there is a lot of glue I would definitely spend the money on an oscillating tool and get one of the cutting tools. It should make quick work of getting the glue off but won't be as aggressive/damaging as a reciprocating saw.


6

I highly recommend against attempting to repair a tank that handles compressed air at over 100 PSI. Failure could be impressive and catastrophic. None of the liquid repairs designed for fuel tanks or tires are in any way appropriate, and a full reconditioning is not cost-effective. fred_dot_u is correct that the damage was caused by internal moisture. The ...


6

I did something similar on a smaller area. I used some plastic tools - scrapers etc and some cement remover product. The cement remover product has an acid base (stings like xxxx if you have an open cut...), but I only applied it to small areas (used a cotton bud) and never to the joints between the tiles you want to keep. If you don’t have patience at ...


6

Wood glue, always. Sandpaper the dowel and hole to give a better surface for the glue to hold.


6

For a curved rod, with its substantial torque load (twisting force), not much short of epoxy or urethane will hold reliably. I just wouldn't do it since removing those things from tile would be a chore and may result in surface damage. Wall tile is often soft with a very thin glaze. One other option might be to mount a bracket or plate above or alongside ...


5

If Bessey K style are not in the budget, Bessey H pipe end clamps are very economical, with new lengths available for the price of an iron (or steel) pipe. Found these on Amazon UK


5

I'm sorry for the delay but wanted to provide an update. When the dance floor was removed, there was a heavy amount of liquid nails covering about 500 sq ft. We had to remove it in order to lay new tile. We tried chipping it, which worked but took a lot of time. The best approach was purchasing a bottle of adhesive remover from Home Depot-- it's stated ...


5

I would use a two part epoxy for a permanent install. The only way you're getting it off is to chip away the underlying tile. Construction adhesive such as PL400 would also work. It's used to glue concrete pavers together when building a wall. However, it can become brittle over time and break off. If your attachments are ceramic as well, then the ...


5

You should not do this. Foam insulation (EPS, XPS, etc.) needs to be covered with drywall in order to protect it (extend the amount of time before it melts) from fire. Otherwise you are risk of being exposed to toxic fumes and melting foam should you ever have a fire. Imagine molten foam dripping from your ceiling onto you - not a situation you want to find ...


5

If they aren't level, and scraping is too daunting, I suggest sistering new studs to the existing ones but have them stick out 1/8 inch. I'd suggest using metal ones as that'd make the job extremely quick.


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