Hot answers tagged

23

The white marks are joint compound (aka "drywall mud") - kind of like plaster. The stripes are where separate sheets of drywall are joined with tape and mud and the little splotches are where screw holes have been covered over with mud. Those actually are good places to install your storage rack because they indicate the locations of the lumber framing that ...


22

That looks like heating tape. You wrap it round water pipes in the garage or somewhere else cold. It provides just enough heat to stop the pipes freezing. I've used this in the past on outside taps. It is available at most big DIY shops. It doesn't use much power.


20

You'd do this like you would add any other new window. Find the studs, choose a location, cut square holes in the drywall on both sides, cut sections out of the intervening studs to make room for the new window, and frame the new window properly like this: Then you would flash the rough opening's sill with self-adhering membrane and install the window just ...


20

TLDR: The spring failed naturally due to old age or manufacturing defect. Not your fault. As an aside, learn to properly grease garage doors. Oh boy. The bull-oney here is thick. Let's start with Springs vs Door Motion. The Spring is a counterweight. THAT IS ALL. We're not even talking about lifters yet. Just the door, with no external forces to move ...


18

You can't do that You cannot come off a 30A breaker with #10 wire (so far so good) and then terminate it at 15-20A receptacles. (nope, nope, nope!) Unfortunately people sometimes become aware of the rule that allows 15 or 20A receptacles on 20A circuits, and they falsely generalize that to "Any receptacle <= circuit capacity". Nope. The receptacle ...


15

People were using them to secure things or hang things on. They serve no purpose. I would just pull them out since hammering them in probably will not be that easy. You might want to get a small board to press against so you do no damage drywall. Also FYI I do not think the drywall that is currently on there is going to take pain - even primer - that well....


14

Oh, yes It's a cornerstone of passive solar design. We spent $2.4M on a large building we intend to never heat. We insulated it to the nines. Here's what that does. Extremes of temperature are moderated by building's thermal mass*, which (with the insulation) helps it resist changes in temperature. This affects Condensation, which is significantly ...


14

The immediate issue I see is that a floodlight is not great for lighting a room. They cast harsh shadows, create a lot of glare if you look anywhere near their direction, and will leave plenty of dark areas in the room. Of course, a few of those downsides could be fixed by just installing regular light bulbs rather than flood bulbs unless it has integrated ...


13

My answer is almost always the same when talking about garage subpanels. 60 ampere double pole breaker in the main panel. 6 AWG copper wire (x4) for a run less than 75ft., 4 AWG copper wire (x4) for runs less than 150ft. 60 ampere panel with 60 ampere main breaker. Unless you're running a whole bunch of stuff at once, a 60 amp panel should serve you well. ...


13

Yes, a switch that shuts off power to the garage door opener would make it unresponsive to commands from a remote (or anything else, such as a hardwired button). In some models, it may be possible to wire a separate switch to disable only the remote receiver while maintaining the functionality of wired buttons. You may also look into setting a new code for ...


13

With the epoxies I have used minor imperfections like small divots from a heavy object chipping the floor are usually filled in. The epoxy can make a very slick surface. For instance, I coated one bay of my shop that I do automotive work in and wanted it like glass so oil spills were easier to clean. This worked great until I spilled some antifreeze. The ...


12

Looks badly done - grass should have been removed before paving, grade fixed if needed so water won't run from driveway into garage. For a crude fix, place a slot drain right up against the garage to divert water, and infill with lots of "cold patch" to make the slope inbetween as smooth as possible, rather than this huge drop at the end of the pavement. ...


12

It is almost certainly drywall (also called wallboard or plasterboard), which usually consists of a gypsum based core with paper faces on each side. The damage looks only cosmetic. You could cut out the damaged section and replace it with a patch and then tape and mud it. However, it looks shallow and intact enough to just fill in over it. You need drywall ...


10

(mild) Soap and water, sure. Don't use WD-40. It isn't a lubricant. Instead, look for white lithium grease. You can get it in a spray can with one of those small straw like things to put it exactly where you want it.


10

A few things come into play. One is heat transfer from your home (or to it, in your case). If you keep your garage more comfortable, you improve the efficiency of the home's HVAC system. In my case, the uninsulated garage stays 20-30 degrees warmer than outside, mostly due to solar gain and heat loss from my home's conditioned space. This means my home loses ...


10

Due to medical conditions I need lots of light and I don't due well with harsh direct lighting or shadows. For lots of light, I have often installed alternate 'outdoor' lighting inside. I even have a 18000 lumen high bay light! To deal with the harshness, I often install in an 'indirect mode' with the light pointing upward with the light bounced off the ...


9

Pull 4 conductors (2 ungrounded (hot), 1 grounded (neutral), 1 grounding) (250.32(B)(1)). Grounded (neutral) and grounding bus must be separate at sub-panel (250.32(B)(1)). No need for a GFCI breaker in the main panel, unless your local code requires it. A grounding electrode system is required at the second structure (250.32(A)).


9

You may be able to rig up something whether the compressor-side air intake and exhaust are piped outside, but the efficiency will be low and you may risk burning out the compressor by working it too hard. If you want something you can install in a small opening, you might consider wheeled portable AC units which come with a flexible duct. If you're still ...


9

Since the transformer says "Gaslight Conversions", that's a pretty strong clue that it's part of a lighting system from Gaslight Conversions, located in St Paul MN, which also matches what's written on the transformer. If you've ruled out all of your exterior lighting, it may be leftover from a low voltage lighting system that was replaced but never fully ...


9

Wrap the edges of the tarp around a 1x2 and then screw through the 1x2 and into the garage frame. The more times you can wrap, the better. EDIT - just saw the last photo. You could screw a 1x2 against the side of the stud that the tarp is currently wrapping around.


9

Looks to me like a doorbell transformer.


9

This is what an unpainted surface looks like. Those white marks are joint/drywall compound and under them are screws holding the drywall to the joists. The long white lines are the same thing except on a junction between two sheets of drywall. So there are screws and a seam under them. You can install a rack along the white marks but not directly in the ...


9

WD-40 is NOT a lubricant. In fact it will dissolve and wash away any lubricant that was there to begin with. If you think the problem is lack of lubrication, white lithium grease or similar is a good choice. There is a WD-40 branded white lithium spray that is quite convenient but there are other brands as well. As far as whether your hinges and rollers ...


8

Turning a cold space into a warm space is absolutely doable, but the trick is doing it the right way to avoid creating longer term health or structural problems later. The proper way to create a warm space is to create two different kinds of protections against the elements - a thermal break to hold in heat, and a moisture barrier to hold in water. The ...


8

The most important question here is, 'do you have a building plan?" Building a structure with 13 to 14 foot walls and a 12 foot door is quite a reach for an inexperienced DIYer. You should start by selecting a set of building plans at your local lumber yard or maybe online. There are a lot more considerations than what size studs you should be using. You are ...


8

If the canoe is getting in the way, can you not put a second pulley wheel with the cord over it off to the side so you can pull the cord from the ground? Then you can just use a standard cleat.


8

Your plumber seems to be poorly educated if you are left without the following solutions having been mentioned. This is pretty standard problem for folks with a boiler AND a woodstove - the woodstove keeps the house warm and the boiler pipes are subject to freezing off in the corners of the house. Not that this is your situation, but a "standard" solution ...


8

I think you answered your own question: They do have pipe insulation on them (though due to my own stupidity the insulation on the place that burst had fallen off and I hadn't replaced it.) The pipe insulation on the rest of the system worked as it should. The only reported failure was where there was not insulation. This suggests to me that the ...


8

Torsion springs have a finite lifespan. They break. I seriously doubt that a little grease was a factor. Replace them both and move on with life. After you've done so, disconnect the opener (if present) and lift the door to mid-height. Does it balance there? Does it move freely throughout the range of travel? If not, deal with that. If so, you're done. ...


8

They look like nails used as simple hangers. The ones in the corners are clearly driven into studs. These can be removed without issue.


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