15

The metal that you are detecting is probably the metal studs that are in each corner of the column. From the picture it looks like that column is also sheathed in drywall and so there may very well be a metal corner strip along each vertical edge as well. The metal studs width are typically going to be 3.5 inches. The drywall thickness from the adjoining ...


5

Can I drill through this? I wouldn't until you've determined exactly what it is. I can come up with suggestions (see lower down this answer) but you may need to take the drywall off, check what it is, and then if it's not an issue you could reinstate drywall, make good, and then drill. What is it? It could be metal pipes. The drainage stack is often ...


5

Most tapers place the metal corner bead first. This is primarily because if you were to do any taping first you'd have to wait until that dries to install corner bead. It's a matter of efficiency. It's also usually best to keep metal bead set snugly to the drywall, with nothing behind it. This allows you to keep it straighter and on plane. It should ...


5

If you hit metal, stop Regardless of what else it might be, it might be a metal plate placed there on purpose to guard electrical wiring or plastic piping. Such a plate is required anytime pipes or wiring is within 1.75" of the surface. It is there only to warn.


3

Other than the first coat being forced into the joints, this is not two separate operations. You're going to be looking for one joint from the corner bead to the feather-edge of the butt-joint. As for number of coats, as many as it takes, remembering not to waste time fussing over them - get mud on, let dry, sand or scrape for high spots, more mud for low ...


3

Based on the overall condition of this outside corner: The peeling of the joint compound appears caused by the corner being repeatedly hit. The corner bead does not appear particularly damaged, deformed, or detached. One could drive a 1-1/4" to 1-1/2" drywall screw through it without pre-drilling (a 10d nail would be sufficient to create a "starter hole",...


2

I had a similar situation where the backer board extended a few inches past my planned tiling edge in my shower. After I had finished with the tile, I taped the joint and applied joint compound over the backer board and it seems great. It's been three years and there is no cracking or any problem with it. That's not exactly an answer but I hope it helps you ...


2

Corner bead is usually applied in places where you have solid lumber backing. I'd try this first to hang your hardware without anchors, which usually aren't intended to be used in wood: Mark the location of your screw holes. Find a drill bit that's just larger than the outer diameter (threads) of the screws you're using. Carefully drill just through the ...


2

It seems to me that there are two possibilities here. If the opening in the wall is just a pass through without an actual door itself then you would band the opening with drywall material and then put normal metal corner edging around the outside corners of the drywall. On the other hand if there is a door jamb in use with an actual door then the width ...


2

The corner bead that I use is pre taped. Put mud on the wall and push the bead in and work the mud out and over the tape. If using the bare metal anchor with screws then mud and tape. Putting tape under the corner bead will make it bulkier and not have a nice crisp corner.


2

I see no need to get into the tile here. I would just do a light scrape, then sand it down. Seal it with a stain-blocking primer, then do any drywall repair. Prime it again and paint. Replacing part of the bead with plastic could help prevent further rust if you're unable to rectify the water issue. Surgically remove a section of the metal bead using a ...


2

No need to mess with the tape job. It's just a matter of filling the depressions on each wall that create that wiggle. The easiest way is to completely repair one wall, then the other. It can get frustrating to try and do both at once, but it's possible. Your 12" knife isn't quite ideal, but it'll do. A 16" or wider knife or trowel would be great. ...


2

I'm not sure I understand the problem. That corner is beautiful compared to most. Corner bead isn't normally screwed, though, for the reason you've encountered--screws pull way to hard and cause deformation. Use drywall nails (gently) or narrow-crown staples (like for underlayment). Be sure to keep the bead above the plane of the wall. In the photo, the top ...


2

There's really no change to your process here. I prefer to tape the butt joints so I can then skim out the bead without interference. This would be true whether the butt joint was near the bead or not. I don't think of taping in terms of "coats". You have a series of steps that leads to an outcome--specifically a flat surface. This isn't paint, and the ...


1

To get a straight line as a beginner you could use a paper faced inside corner bead which is available even at the big box stores. After applying a 4" wide strip of mud on both sides of the corner, install the corner bead and press it into the mud and eyeball the line or use a long level. Embed with a 6" knife and remove excess and do NOT apply any ...


1

Typically, when butting corner-bead you should, first, cut about a 2" to 3" piece of bead and place it under the butt joint. That way your two pieces will butt together neatly and will be smooth when you mud over them. If your run is longer than 10', you'll need to do this (most bead is 8', but 10' is also available).


1

Joe, sorry to use the "answer" function again instead of adding another comment, I wanted to attach more pictures. The tile I used was not available with a bullnose so I finished it flat on the sidewall. The edge cant be seen normally so I did not spend time making it perfect, but for your situation I retract my note about never finishing an edge with ...


1

You should NOT treat the top of the curb as a dry area, prepare it the same way as you prepare the shower floor (and it should be sloped toward the shower). I think you should tile the whole top and front of the curb . If you cant find a suitable "corner round", you could finish the edge of the tile at the front of the curb, or finish the front edge corner ...


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