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4

I suspect that the tile is being fed at a slight bias. This can result in one side of the cutting edge of the blade working differently on the cut edge of the tile. It can also result in tearout at the rear of the blade due to dragging. Check wither the feed motion of your table aligns perfectly with the position of the saw blade.


3

The Popping and the Water Your two pictures, especially the second showing the bonding, and the your description about the knocking are revealing, and they are related. The second picture shows large voids in the cement/thinset. Floor tiles must have more than 80%, preferably around 90% cement fill and bonding, where the voids are sporadic, small and ...


2

Ceramic tiles approved for flooring and porcelain tiles are much harder than the ceramic wall tile variants, and they require deep and continuous scoring in order to provide a straight snap cut. When the snap cut curves away from the scoring line (as in your picture) it means that the scoring was not deep enough especially at and around the tile edge where ...


2

The two most likely answers are insufficient mortar coverage on the back of the tile your floors are not rigid enough and the flex allows the tile to debond overtime TCNA says 1 1/4" of floor thickness for tile but a lot of people just tile right overtop 5/8" standard thickness subfloor. Did they install a decoupling membrane on the subfloor? ...


2

On a sliding bridge saw like this, it is important to ensure that the plane of the blade is accurately parallel to the sliding guides. If it isn't parallel, the back of the blade removes additional material from one side of the cut, and because it is moving upwards it is more likely to cause chipping.


2

First you need to figure out "how is water getting into my wall"? Do you have access on the other side. Is there an apparent gap? If you can push tile, there is literally mush/mold behind it. Your solution is simple. Take down tile and wall and fix it right. There is no other solution because the all involve more money, more time, and more ...


2

I think if everything about the original installation was perfect, the tiles would not come up now. A little water would not cause this damage. Hard to say what was wrong. Maybe wrong thinset coverage, maybe it's not thinset but something else that is prone to water damage or that didn't stick to the concrete very well, maybe the slab had a non-porous ...


2

They make sealers that add friction to the surface. Search for something like "Anti Slip Penetrating Sealer". Just pick a product for your tile and follow application instructions.


1

By heck, but this is broad. We don't know anything about you, your house, your furniture or your environment. Is your house bright & airy or does it need brightness generating by swathes of colour? Do you live in cold Northern industrial town in a middle terrace with tiny windows, or by a beach in the Bahamas, with floor-to-ceiling windows, bamboo ...


1

Some people have had success using epoxy grout to fix tiles that have come de bonded. When you say cement are you referring to the concrete slab or to the thinset used to bond the tiles? Both products contain cement. Generally cement based products aren't damaged by water. Epoxy grout is expensive and hard to work with and you'd have to ungrout all around ...


1

I do not trouble myself with a temporary ledger board being straight. As long as it is reasonably straight, tile shims will bring the tile to a straight line. In many cases tile needs to be shimmed here and there in order to keep the rows looking good. These shims should be on hand along with a straight edge as a rule when setting tile.


1

This is what I ended up doing Finding a straight and cheap piece of lumber at Home Depot (or any other similar store) is going to be a challenge. So I picked the straightest piece of 1x8x8 pine shelf and I asked them to cut it in half along the long side ...that cut will always be straight on both sides ...their saws are not precision saws but they do cut ...


1

1 & 2 Tile up to the ceiling. My ceiling is off by 1/2" over 4'and it's not noticeable. If you stop short it will be noticeable. If you have a horizontal grout line close to the ceiling it will be noticeable. With 24" tile, and proper layout you should not have a grout line close to the ceiling. #3 tile close to the wall and caulk (not grout), ...


1

All utility boxes come with 2 holes (at least) for attaching a face plate - this is probably mentioned in somewhere in the NEC. He was probably explaining something simple in a weird-complicated way. The only extra you may need for tile is a box extender and even these aren't needed most of the time.


1

Ended up removing the existing leveling concrete, putting down primer, then adding a poured leveling compound, then a Ditra decoupling membrane, and finally tiling over the top. here is a better pic of the starting surfaces: And then the leveling compound (notice the green laser helping us maintain the gravity level of the compound): And Finally, DITRA ...


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