23

Screws: It doesn't sound like you're reattaching the entire floor; this is more like strategic intervals to solidify the fastening. Your nail/screw rate is not as important as if you were attaching a new subfloor from scratch. Glue and screw is popular for more reasons than just rhyming You're going through this effort to make it right. So do it right.


16

With these types of tiles you do not want them to break as they are harder to demo when they are in bits and shards. If you try to use a scraper (even power) what inevitably ends up happening is the top of the tile comes off, leaving the much harder to remove bottom on. Also this method severely damages the subfloor, sometimes to the point that you will ...


11

Yes, that is perfectly fine and recommended. Instead of Phillips-head stainless steel screws, I would actually recommend Deckmate decking screws that have torx heads (six-pronged star) so the driver bit has more grip. I have very bad experience with stripping Phillips heads.


10

Don't wait for the carpet installers. Find your worst squeaks, cut through the carpet and padding, and put the screws in there right now. Then you can hit any missed spots and otherwise stay out of the installers way tomorrow.


8

Screws. Nails will pull out over time.


8

By "drywall screws", I think you are meaning 1 5/8" blued screws. I do not think that they would be a good choice. We usually shoot down plywood subflooring with 2 1/2" to 3" ring shank nails, however 2" to 2 1/2" decking screws work well, but just a lot more work. I would encourage you to use a little adhesive on top of the floor joists or strips of felt ...


8

Using a circular saw set to the thickness of the sub floor, cut a square between the center of the two nearest joists. The saw is held on an angle and slowly lowered to the floor, then moved to the cut lines. BE CAREFUL WHEN LOWERING THE SAW KEEP YOU LIMBS AWAY FROM THE BACK OF THE BLADE if you lower the blade to fast, it can wheel off backwards cutting a ...


8

The plywood goes down so the groove is away from the wall, that way, after the row is finished, or at least when you decide to start the next row, a 2X4 can be placed across the joists at the edge of the next row and drive, with a sledgehammer, the second run into the first. The gap should be 1/8" between ends. The tongue and groove (T&G) of the sheets ...


8

This floor has been floated, a very common and traditional method for preparing surfaces for tile. To "float" is to apply a cement and sand mix similar to concrete but without rocks, gravel or coarse sand. A 2" thick float is not uncommon at all. It is often applied using a "dry pack" method wherein only enough water is mixed to ensure proper set but wet ...


7

I really think a belt sander would do a nicer job than an angle grinder. You could use a small handheld model with 40 or 60 grit belts, or rent a larger one used to refinish hardwood floors if you need to do larger areas.


7

Filling the holes is the easy part. You put a scrap of 2x4 under the floor across the hole on each side and run screws through the existing subfloor to fix the scrap in place. Then just fit a piece of sub floor in the opening and screw it onto the 2x4's. The hard part is replacing the flooring itself. If it's hardwood, you have to try to match the grain and ...


7

Are the tongues necessary? Can I just take my circular saw right between the boards, cut them way, and then screw them back down afterward? You've been misinformed. The point of tongue-in-groove planking is to keep the floor boards from twisting, slipping and sliding against each other and squeaking (or squeaking more in your case). You still need to ...


7

You could simply install a transition piece between the two rooms. But if you're determined to get them to match up, then 1/4" luann board will do nicely. Glue and screw - 1/4 bead of glue distributed evenly over each board, screws on a 1 foot grid. NOT going overboard is what leads to squeaky, shifting sub-floors that make for a shoddy looking finished ...


7

Install a new plywood subfloor elevated on sleepers to match the existing adjacent floor surfaces. A sleeper is a piece of dimensional lumber (such as a framing stud) ripped to the desired thickness.


7

The following options will perform equally, their differences are time, cost, and thickness of the subfloor. Best case scenario you'll still have a 3/4" subfloor, worst case you'll have 1 1/4" (sorted most economical in cost/time to least): Lay 1/2 or (preferably) 5/8 over the existing floor. It's simple, and should provide enough strength with the existing ...


6

I wouldn't. Drywall screws should only be used for drywall, and a temporary coat hanger. You want more strength and need less space for the threads to secure the subfloor. The drywall screws have a lot of thread to hold the drywall itself, but have very little shear strength.


6

It's also known as rosin paper: Its main purpose is to stop air leaking through cracks in the subfloor and floor which is especially important if the space below the floor is unconditioned. (You'll also find claims that it prevents the floor from squeaking or muffles sound transmission through the floor.)


6

I think your contractor is right on the money, it's way easier to approach the problem from above than below, and trying to fix it from below would be very difficult to do properly. Floors generally creak because the floor material isn't strongly connected to the joists, to when you step the joists rub against the subflooring , and the subflooring segments ...


6

The framing in a basement is non structural. The only weight on the walls is the wall itself and minor loads from shelving, etc. The purpose of Dricore is to isolate everything from the floor and walls except the plastic spacing material on the bottom. Dricore is also installed with a small gap at the walls. If you build on top of the Dricore, the studs are ...


6

Step one, which I hope you are already doing - put on a pair of safety glasses. You may also want earplugs, and gloves. Use a masonry chisel (nearly parallel to the floor) to get under it and lift it up. You can also drive it into the grout joints, but if you already have a few tiles out, driving under the remaining ones from the area where some are removed ...


6

I would replace the subfloor by floating some scrap lumber under two edges of the opening and screwing them in place. Then screw down the patch. I'd then run tile down both sides of the stove opening and halfway back from the front, but leave the patched area uncovered in case you need later access. This gives you the impression of a completed floor from ...


5

I can't imagine the sand idea working. I'd probably scratch that one off the list. Is the basement dry? If you feel that you still need a sloped floor to deal with water issues, I think you want to tackle those first before thinking about finishing the floor. Otherwise, your shimming idea makes the most sense. I don't think pebbles will work but some form ...


5

You got the right idea, but I'd opt for adding a double 2X? between the existing joists at either end of the bathroom span and fill in with an extra joist making your spacing 12 inches on center instead of 24. Add a couple of perpendicular stiffeners, and you will have a good stable base for your new 3/4" sub-flooring. Tile needs a good solid base or your ...


5

If possible, try framing out the edges. I would remove all of the existing sub floor (since it is particle board) and then add addition framing along the edges as needed for the new plywood. In cases where you can't meet a joist, go perpindicular and create a nice foundation for the floor to attach too. I would make sure the floor has a firm foundation. ...


5

The plywood is there to make the vinyl the same height as the rest of the flooring in the house. If you add backerboard + tile on top of it, you are going to add somewhere in the range of 5/8" to 3/4" of height. That is enough to be a tripping hazard, and it also wouldn't look very nice. Pulling up the plywood and the putting down the backer board is the ...


5

You defiantly need to support the subfloor around the perimeter. Let's say this is your floor without plywood. You want to put plywood down, but the edge of the sheet has nothing under it for support. If you don't support the plywood, you'll end up with a "soft" spot around the perimeter. Stepping, or adding weight to this area will cause the plywood to ...


5

Fasten your first layer plywood subfloor as you normally should. The second (top) layer of plywood joints should not coincide with the joists and the second layer should not be fastened to the joists. Article quote from - Position of Underlayment to Prevent Cracked Tile and Grout By Frank Woeste and Peter A. Nielsen For publication by the TILE LETTER ...


5

One comment on the advice you read is that I don't see a thing in there about deflection - evidently Mike Holmes is sure that if he merely has 1-1/4" of subfloor, all is good. Real tile specs tend to involve a concept called deflection, and that's the distance part of the floor system moves when loaded, relative to the span you measure over. L/360 is a ...


5

After spending several hours researching, there still appears to be little consensus on this topic. But here is a summary of potential solutions. The Problem But first, the problem: the issue with High Efficiency Front loaders is that the vibrations are vertical. The drum spins horizontally so the vibration is all in an up-and-down motion. It's also ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible