16

With these types of tiles you do not want them to break as they are harder to demo when they are in bits and shards. If you try to use a scraper (even power) what inevitably ends up happening is the top of the tile comes off, leaving the much harder to remove bottom on. Also this method severely damages the subfloor, sometimes to the point that you will ...


11

Yes, that is perfectly fine and recommended. Instead of Phillips-head stainless steel screws, I would actually recommend Deckmate decking screws that have torx heads (six-pronged star) so the driver bit has more grip. I have very bad experience with stripping Phillips heads.


9

The plywood goes down so the groove is away from the wall, that way, after the row is finished, or at least when you decide to start the next row, a 2X4 can be placed across the joists at the edge of the next row and drive, with a sledgehammer, the second run into the first. The gap should be 1/8" between ends. The tongue and groove (T&G) of the sheets ...


9

This floor has been floated, a very common and traditional method for preparing surfaces for tile. To "float" is to apply a cement and sand mix similar to concrete but without rocks, gravel or coarse sand. A 2" thick float is not uncommon at all. It is often applied using a "dry pack" method wherein only enough water is mixed to ensure proper set but wet ...


9

When I am redoing a bathroom and adding the needed backer board to a subfloor assembly, I would remove all existing finish floors no matter how many to get back down to the original subfloor. Then evaluate that, repair it if needed, add to it if needed to make it stiff enough for tile, then add the one layer of 1/4" backer board, then the heating wires, ...


9

The concern is probably that adhesives won't bond to treated plywood, or maybe that color will leach out and stain the new flooring. You're right that you're seeing paint overspray on your subfloor. It looks like standard raw BC plywood. Single-family residential subfloors are rarely treated, in my experience. This may not be true in some high population ...


7

The following options will perform equally, their differences are time, cost, and thickness of the subfloor. Best case scenario you'll still have a 3/4" subfloor, worst case you'll have 1 1/4" (sorted most economical in cost/time to least): Lay 1/2 or (preferably) 5/8 over the existing floor. It's simple, and should provide enough strength with the existing ...


7

Just add (nail, screw, and/or glue) additional framing material to the side face of the joist to provide more bearing area for the subfloor.


7

I did it both ways in a laundry/powder room I completed last year. Along the one wall, I installed the nailing plates your described. Along another wall, I didn't, in part because the sole plate for the wall had to be down before the subfloor, in order to run the plumbing. Also this area holds the washer/dryer & a utility sink, so no foot traffic. In ...


7

If I don't install a nailing edge, is it likely I will have a noticeable bounce? No, because you can't stand that close to the wall. The only unsupported edge is right at the face of the wall If I should install a nailing edge, but can't fit a full height joist in place, will a 2x4 add enough rigidity to be worth the energy to install? Yes. A 2x4 is ...


6

The framing in a basement is non structural. The only weight on the walls is the wall itself and minor loads from shelving, etc. The purpose of Dricore is to isolate everything from the floor and walls except the plastic spacing material on the bottom. Dricore is also installed with a small gap at the walls. If you build on top of the Dricore, the studs are ...


6

Step one, which I hope you are already doing - put on a pair of safety glasses. You may also want earplugs, and gloves. Use a masonry chisel (nearly parallel to the floor) to get under it and lift it up. You can also drive it into the grout joints, but if you already have a few tiles out, driving under the remaining ones from the area where some are removed ...


6

That looks like an almost non-issue (especially if the flooring will run the same direction as that level, if not you'll need to do something about it). If it's a low traffic area it might not concern me in the slightest. I HATE, quote, "self leveling" compound. It should called: aww crap, now what? (you had better know how to trowel concrete) And if you'...


6

I would replace the subfloor by floating some scrap lumber under two edges of the opening and screwing them in place. Then screw down the patch. I'd then run tile down both sides of the stove opening and halfway back from the front, but leave the patched area uncovered in case you need later access. This gives you the impression of a completed floor from ...


6

That looks like good old plywood decking. No obvious treatment there.


5

The plywood is there to make the vinyl the same height as the rest of the flooring in the house. If you add backerboard + tile on top of it, you are going to add somewhere in the range of 5/8" to 3/4" of height. That is enough to be a tripping hazard, and it also wouldn't look very nice. Pulling up the plywood and the putting down the backer board is the ...


5

You defiantly need to support the subfloor around the perimeter. Let's say this is your floor without plywood. You want to put plywood down, but the edge of the sheet has nothing under it for support. If you don't support the plywood, you'll end up with a "soft" spot around the perimeter. Stepping, or adding weight to this area will cause the ...


5

Fasten your first layer plywood subfloor as you normally should. The second (top) layer of plywood joints should not coincide with the joists and the second layer should not be fastened to the joists. Article quote from - Position of Underlayment to Prevent Cracked Tile and Grout By Frank Woeste and Peter A. Nielsen For publication by the TILE LETTER ...


5

One comment on the advice you read is that I don't see a thing in there about deflection - evidently Mike Holmes is sure that if he merely has 1-1/4" of subfloor, all is good. Real tile specs tend to involve a concept called deflection, and that's the distance part of the floor system moves when loaded, relative to the span you measure over. L/360 is a ...


5

After spending several hours researching, there still appears to be little consensus on this topic. But here is a summary of potential solutions. The Problem But first, the problem: the issue with High Efficiency Front loaders is that the vibrations are vertical. The drum spins horizontally so the vibration is all in an up-and-down motion. It's also ...


5

1/2" plywood is for temporary applications, exterior sheathing and used as gigantic shims. It does not belong as a floor or a roof; minimum 5/8" exterior grade. HardieBacker: What subfloor should HardieBacker board be installed over? The minimum subfloor specified is 5/8" exterior grade plywood or 23/32'' exterior grade OSB subflooring. HardieBacker ...


5

The installation manual for HardieBacker suggests to embed it in thin-set and it should be installed over plywood. Thus I would suggest removing the current wood planks flooring, install a 3/4" outdoor grade plywood, thinset and then your HardieBacker (screwed down). All of this is to prevent as much movement in your substrate and avoid cracks in your ...


5

Your current plywood is suitable for hardwood installation. I do not ever like to use 1/4 subfloor as it is brittle and when screwed sometimes doesn't lay flat. If I added to your subfloor I would at least put in 1/2 inch but like I said you don't need it with 16" OC. Note that a thicker sub might have benefits but at the same time you are adding weight ...


5

According to Table R602.3(1) of International Residential Code (IRC), subfloor fastener schedule is as follows: 3/8"-1/2" panels. Use 6d common nails, spaced 6" apart on edges and 12" apart in the field. 19/32"-1" panels. Use 8d common nails, spaced 6" apart on edges and 12" apart in the field. 1 1/8"-1 1/4" panels. Use 10d common or 8d deformed nails, ...


5

I wouldn't chance going over it either. If it's easily breaking and giving when you walk on it, replace it with new T&G sub flooring. Otherwise, you are going to have a bunch of cracked tiles. You might even have some floor joist issues to deal with and you can't really find that out without removing the old sub flooring. You can start by cutting as ...


5

There are shims made for these situations. Have a look These are made by traxx. Ask at your local carpet shop or order on line If you take a look at the link you will see a variety of options including one shim that is 24” in the ramp from 0-1”. In my opinion this is a good fix for a transition like yours and is easy to walk across. You can of course ...


4

Practically speaking, it will be better to keep the integrity of the new floor intact. But the small unsealed gap will probably not be a major concern if you leave them on the slab. I do have to say, however, a difference of 1 3/4" on the bottom riser does not meet current IRC code. The difference in riser height cannot exceed 3/8 inch. You may be ...


4

If you have open studs on the side walls and then want to add inside finish panneling or drywall to those walls after the flooring is in you would need to go along and glue/nail in a spacer block in between each pair of studs so that there is something to nail the bottom edge of the wall material to.


4

Type of flooring dictates how "perfect" it needs to be, carpet being the least work. Vinyl is flexible so just no real drastic changes. Below are the basic steps to fixing uneven concrete floors. Use a straight edge and mark high and low spots. (Really exaggerated case in this image) Or if you like gadgets, Bosch has a new laser out that lets you easily ...


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