23

If you are not removing more drywall than needed for the new recessed lights, then no per 334.30(B)(1) (assuming you are using NM cable). There are similar clauses for other flexible cable assemblies (e.g. AC/MC). However, if you are removing drywall as part of the remodel and have access to the studs, then you do need to secure and support according the ...


14

When I used to do a lot of these for a building/renovation company, the approach our foreman recommended was to assume the drywall will need replacing anyway and just rip it out. That would let you remove that entire panel in 45 minutes, and then you can just pop a new piece of drywall in, which is another 15 minutes. As you can see from your 45 minutes, ...


14

The framing above the pantry door is not load bearing. The doorway to the left of the pantry in the middle picture is load bearing. You can tell by the solid header.


10

You likely need flat, not level. And for that, all you really need is some sort of a long, straight edge. A yard stick works pretty well ... just place it down anywhere you think there might be a dip or bump, and if the yard stick is flat against the floor its whole length, you're fine. As for the implications of not having it flat, I'm not sure for ...


9

The floor doesn't have to be completely flat as long as any bumps or hollows are relatively shallow (like rolling hills rather than mountain peaks and valleys). If there are gaps or ridges in the floor then this will create areas where the linoleum will wear more than the rest of the floor. This is because there will be movement of the linoleum where it can ...


9

The "correct" way to do it, is to remove or cut the tile where the wall will go. Whether or not you want to do that, is up to your personal preference.


9

It would be very worth investing in at least two layers of protection. I'd start with something that will accommodate dust and debris. It should seal against them, but it should also cushion them if they do work their way in. There are some felt-lined plastic products to be found, and there are some paper-based products that would do as well. Roll them out ...


8

Tile is generally installed as a permanent fixture. Removal is intended to be difficult - in fact easy removal is a clear indicator that the installation wasn't done well. The sub-material is often destroyed in the removal process because of the force necessary for removal of the product. DITRA, being textured, would hold onto the mortar used to mount the ...


8

Sorry, I am going to have to disagree with some of the above posters. It all comes down to the interpretation of due diligence. Hypothetically, if you bought the place and know that work was done without permits, you have actually created your own problem, now, by advertising the fact that you know about the negligent work. If you now rent it and there ...


8

Electricians "fish" wires through existing homes by the thousands every day without stapling. Staple if you can (every 4' in attics, within 12" of all boxes), and don't if you can't. Use some common sense to prevent any future damage to the wiring by avoiding sharp or metallic objects or high-traffic areas.


8

In addition to good answers by @statuephemism and @isherwood, it's worth mentioning why you might want to staple and why in your case it probably doesn't matter. First reason to staple is to keep wires out of the way so they don't get accidentally trapped when fitting new drywall on a ceiling for instance. This isn't relevant if the ceiling is already in ...


7

If you have a reciprocating saw (aka "Sawzall") with a metal or demolition blade it should make short work of the nails. Make your cuts at both ends of the vertical studs, between the stud and the header/footer. Once the nails are cut the vertical studs should come right out. You can probably just use a pry bar to pull off the header.


7

It is totally normal to install two groups of lights in one room with separate switches. If you do that then you also have the option to install, now or at a later time, a dimmer and/or timer on each set separately. This is particularly useful for chandeliers vs. other lighting in order to set just the right "mood" for a room - e.g., full brightness on ...


6

National Electrical Code (NEC) typically defines rooms and areas based on the "intended" use of the area. They do not provide a definition for a "storage room", but they do provide a definition for a "clothes closet". Clothes Closet. A non-habitable room or space intended primarily for storage of garments and apparel. To answer the rest of your question, ...


6

The first step is to look at the foundation that supports that the walls of the garage. If the walls have foundations separate from the garage floor slab and those foundations are similar in construction and depth to those of the main house then this is a good indicator that you are in a good position to proceed with the remodel plans. On the other hand if ...


6

You'd need to get an engineer to look at it first. The biggest problems I can think of are structural -- even if the house is pier and beam, you'd need to move piers out. If it's not, you would need to dig out a new foundation. Then you have to figure out if the overhang is actually appropriate as a roof over indoor space, that moving the wall won't ...


6

For solid 2D performance I've always been a fan of Microsoft Visio. I use it for everything from electrical layouts to micro electronics signal flow to civil engineering sketches. The learning curve is minimal if you've ever used any other Microsoft productivity suite. You can also download oodles of templates and design objects, as well as import images, ...


6

The simple answer is if you are going to put down hardwood in the kitchen, it is usually better to install the entire floor before you put down the new base cabinets. It is much harder to fit hardwood to cabinets than to put the cabinets on top of the floor. If you were using vinyl sheet goods, I would advise putting down the subflooring then install the ...


6

I have done quite a few bathrooms from start to finish. You don't always have to do things in a certain order but I can tell you generally how to do things the easiest. You start with your shower pan and/or tub in the bathroom. These are specific sizes. You don't want to have to find something that fits exactly what you need - unless you plan on making ...


6

One of the main purposes of moldings, such as the trim around doors and windows (called casings), is to act as a barrier and seal to wind and water intrusion. Moldings on wall between vertical boards, called battens served a similar purpose. The decorative element was an extra benefit (unless you are an extreme modernist/minimalist who wants totally flat ...


6

You can pull a homeowner permit for fairly cheap ($70 in CO) and that'll get a city inspector to come and check things out. You won't be held liable for the work done, but will be excepted to bring it up to code - which you want to do anyway, since codes are there for a reason. This applies especially to electrical and plumbing, trust me here! This should ...


6

The technique I've used most often is called "scribing". The word simply means "writing" or "tracing", but here's how it goes. Set your board to be fitted in place. I typically tilt it so that I have roughly the same gap at each end if the high spot is in the middle. Otherwise, align the top as you'd like it to ultimately be. Lay a pencil on the surface ...


5

Sweet Home 3D runs in Java on Linux, and Windows. It is very easy to use and a good tool for a quick, "90% perfect" sketch. Very good for indoor sketches. For outdoor sketches I suggest Inkscape. Sometimes I use Inkscape, because I can draw things there much faster then in any CAD program. Of course I do not have the CAD features like "calculate area" and ...


5

If you put a beam across the room you'll feel bad every time you look at it. if you have a flat ceiling, you'll feel proud. Use joist hangers to put some 2x4s between the ceiling joists so that they pass just above the 2x6 (stuff's going to sag), drill through the top plate from below with a spade bit and screw the 2x6 to the 2x4s remove the wall and top ...


4

Graph paper. Seriously. Here is what I did to layout my kitchen (after trying sketch up): Measure the space. Outline your walls on graph paper 1 square = 1 foot. Make a few copies of this, and save the original. Make your appliances as little cutouts, or, just draw out on your draft-copies of graph paper until you like what you have. Unless you do this ...


4

Either way will work. My first impression would be to try to remove the old lino, especially since there is so little of it. If it turns out it too difficult, then simply remove all the loose lino, lay down your foam underlayment and go right over the whole mess. Good luck.


4

You're best off taking everything down, remeasuring at the new location, and putting the wall back up piece by piece. You'll want to pick the lumber that requires the least cutting to fit in the new location, but if the new location happens to have a higher ceiling (concrete floors aren't level and joists can sag in the middle) then you'll need to get new ...


4

As the rest have said, its purely aesthetic. On this side of the kitchen, we took the backsplash all the way to the underside of the top cabinets to fill in the space. Using different types of tile, we made a pattern that we continued on the opposite wall On this side of the kitchen that doesn't have upper cabinets, we stopped it at the top marble bar. The ...


4

European buildings are mostly masonry - brick, stone and concrete. To put even small holes in masonry you must have a hammer action on the drill. The hammering action takes a great deal of power to operate together with the action of rotation, so a cordless hammer-drill will be much weaker than a corded one, and for masonry it makes a big difference. ...


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