36

The difference appears to be about 1/4" to 3/8". If so, I'd fur it out with some 1/4" plywood strips or some 3/8" lath strips.


25

If you are not removing more drywall than needed for the new recessed lights, then no per 334.30(B)(1) (assuming you are using NM cable). There are similar clauses for other flexible cable assemblies (e.g. AC/MC). However, if you are removing drywall as part of the remodel and have access to the studs, then you do need to secure and support according the ...


23

Those are called "finger jointed studs". These joints are weaker than regular 2x4 or 2x6. I do a lot of woodworking and when gluing boards together (for like a table top) the glue joints are actually stronger than the wood itself. But for some reason, that's not the case with finger jointed studs, they are just much weaker than the intact 2x. ...


14

The framing above the pantry door is not load bearing. The doorway to the left of the pantry in the middle picture is load bearing. You can tell by the solid header.


14

This is a perfect scenario for spray foam, which both seals against airflow and adds insulation value. Pick up a couple cans and seal all such joints, then overlay fiberglass batts that match or exceed your wall insulation thickness. Be aware that the standard foam swells to many times its initial size. Use small beads and try to force it into the void ...


11

The "correct" way to do it, is to remove or cut the tile where the wall will go. Whether or not you want to do that, is up to your personal preference.


11

Isherwood is right on the approach - spray foam or caulk - or both (caulk first). I however want to add... If I had a crack this big I would block it off with a 2x4 or even 1x's. This is mouse heaven and caulk/foam aren't keeping mice out.


10

If that leg can be unscrewed and moved over 1/2 inch, that would be my first choice. If not, then I'd get a coping saw and cut the leg to fit the trim.


9

It would be very worth investing in at least two layers of protection. I'd start with something that will accommodate dust and debris. It should seal against them, but it should also cushion them if they do work their way in. There are some felt-lined plastic products to be found, and there are some paper-based products that would do as well. Roll them out ...


9

Electricians "fish" wires through existing homes by the thousands every day without stapling. Staple if you can (every 4' in attics, within 12" of all boxes), and don't if you can't. Use some common sense to prevent any future damage to the wiring by avoiding sharp or metallic objects or high-traffic areas.


9

In addition to good answers by @statuephemism and @isherwood, it's worth mentioning why you might want to staple and why in your case it probably doesn't matter. First reason to staple is to keep wires out of the way so they don't get accidentally trapped when fitting new drywall on a ceiling for instance. This isn't relevant if the ceiling is already in ...


9

That is a join between two bits of timber. The ends are machine cut and glued.


8

Sorry, I am going to have to disagree with some of the above posters. It all comes down to the interpretation of due diligence. Hypothetically, if you bought the place and know that work was done without permits, you have actually created your own problem, now, by advertising the fact that you know about the negligent work. If you now rent it and there ...


8

First, if you have a contract with someone, and a question/suspicion arises about the work specified in that contract, you should just ask the person you are contracting with, rather than go online looking for guesses. We have no idea what happened in your scenario unless you tell us. Second, what do you mean by "his crews"? I assume you spoke with ...


7

I have done quite a few bathrooms from start to finish. You don't always have to do things in a certain order but I can tell you generally how to do things the easiest. You start with your shower pan and/or tub in the bathroom. These are specific sizes. You don't want to have to find something that fits exactly what you need - unless you plan on making ...


7

It is totally normal to install two groups of lights in one room with separate switches. If you do that then you also have the option to install, now or at a later time, a dimmer and/or timer on each set separately. This is particularly useful for chandeliers vs. other lighting in order to set just the right "mood" for a room - e.g., full brightness on ...


6

One of the main purposes of moldings, such as the trim around doors and windows (called casings), is to act as a barrier and seal to wind and water intrusion. Moldings on wall between vertical boards, called battens served a similar purpose. The decorative element was an extra benefit (unless you are an extreme modernist/minimalist who wants totally flat ...


6

You can pull a homeowner permit for fairly cheap ($70 in CO) and that'll get a city inspector to come and check things out. You won't be held liable for the work done, but will be excepted to bring it up to code - which you want to do anyway, since codes are there for a reason. This applies especially to electrical and plumbing, trust me here! This should ...


6

The closeup looks like cement based backer board used to hold tile in wet/damp locations. If so, that is not original. It would be very hard to restore to lathe/plaster throughout, especially if sections are missing. The transition points for repairs tend to crack and show lines. Also, wire mesh is used more than wood lath today. Finding a skilled plasterer ...


6

The technique I've used most often is called "scribing". The word simply means "writing" or "tracing", but here's how it goes. Set your board to be fitted in place. I typically tilt it so that I have roughly the same gap at each end if the high spot is in the middle. Otherwise, align the top as you'd like it to ultimately be. Lay a pencil on the surface ...


6

Since that wall runs parallel to the joists above it is not a load bearing wall. That said, I always recommend that anytime you are going to remove any wall that could be a supporting wall that you hire a structural engineer to get his OK on your project. Removing any load bearing wall without the proper support could be a disaster waiting to happen. My 2 ...


6

Before you get wrapped up in "notch", have you considered drilling a hole? A long(ish) bit, either auger or spade, will go a good long ways, which makes it easy to deal with tight spaces. And you can pick up a 10-14 inch extension if you need one.


5

If you put a beam across the room you'll feel bad every time you look at it. if you have a flat ceiling, you'll feel proud. Use joist hangers to put some 2x4s between the ceiling joists so that they pass just above the 2x6 (stuff's going to sag), drill through the top plate from below with a spade bit and screw the 2x6 to the 2x4s remove the wall and top ...


5

I'd give the contractor a chance to fix things. Your house isn't going to collapse into mold and mush over one event, but you do want to be sure that things are thoroughly dry and that there's no sagging of the drywall or severe warping of lumber. I'd expect the contractor to have fans going in several places, especially in the ceiling joist cavities. I'd ...


4

The reason that 90 degree turns (or any tight radius bends) in duct systems are discouraged are because they reduce air-flow. The friction that is encountered by the moving air as it hits the wall of the turn slows it down decreasing the distance it can travel. There are equations that can be used to calculate the number of bends before air performance is ...


4

The way you insure that wires are left in good order when they are done, is that you do not pay the drywallers in full. If you hold off on paying them in full and wires need to repaired, the amount of the repairs will come off the amount owed to the drywallers.


4

Floors, cabinets, counters, backsplash, appliances. Cabinets could also be done first, especially if you're not refinishing them in place. The idea is to do projects earlier which do not depend on anything else, or when those dependencies have already been completed. Backsplash depends on the counters, so the counters must be done first. Counters depend on ...


4

I'd be walking the site daily. This isn't a new building with major safety hazards. It's your home, and you should have free access outside work hours. Any hazards should be eliminated, marked, or secured by then. I'd want to feel comfortable raising issues with the GC at his/her convenience. I'd recognize that my project is not their only one, and that ...


4

Just as a mention, in traditional wood burning fireplaces, there is to be a 2" air space between the masonry and any wood or combustibles. Anything you add to this fireplace should be metal, unless there is enough space for a 2X flat, so it will lessen the length of the metal framing. This metal framing should be placed horizontally to frame the front down ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible