8

If your problem is that the thickness of the back splash material has caused the electrical boxes to become recessed you may need to use electrical box extenders. These come in a number of styles depending on the type of electrical boxes you have. There are options for metal or plastic boxes for starters. Other factors would be amount of extension needed and ...


6

There are insulating gaskets for switches and outlets like these They would help seal against air leaks, but they might not visually fill the gaps at the edge of a switch plate. There are also deep beveled switch plates, such as those found here. You could custom grind these down with a dremel-type tool to fit the highs and lows of the surface, but that ...


6

I would just drill two holes into the tile and use plastic anchors to face mount it to the tiles. Raise it up slightly so the wires are in the recessed portion. I wouldn't think super glue would work well here. Silicone may work but may end up looking messy.


5

The grout lines in the mosaic tile look like 1/8" is that right? If that's the case you need to space the tiles up off the counter using 1/8" spacers. They shouldn't be directly on the counter as shown in your picture where you're just holding it. When grouting don't grout that area. Use a silicon caulk that matches your grout instead. That leaves 1/4" ...


4

Construction adhesive would certainly do the job, but it would destroy the drywall when you remove it. I'd use silicone caulk as both the adhesive and the caulk to the countertop. It'll be rock solid, and if you ever need to remove it you may be able to do so without ripping paper off the drywall. Just put 2 or 3 quarter-sized dabs along the back. They'll ...


4

Sure, but it leaves you open to a less perfect fit. Backsplashes have much more flexibility of position than a granite top, so the latter should really be installed first. You don't want anyone trying to cut tile after it's installed. That sounds like a risky proposition with respect to quality. I'd prime and paint your drywall and wait.


4

Even though you are replacing a backsplash you are not really remodeling or upgrading your electrical. I can't speak for every inspector but most would say it is alright to leave your receptacles as is under the grandfather clause. One important note, even though you are being allowed to leave the receptacles in place I would recommend you add GFCI ...


4

You might push soap or grime into the gap at the bottom of the cabinets when cleaning the tiles, so it's probably a good idea to seal the gap. I didn't do this in my kitchen and I think intelligent life is evolving in there. I'd use silicone caulking instead of grout at the these locations, because it's more flexible, and I'm convinced that there is always ...


4

Royal Pain the ars to make that wall smooth and workable. I would remove the drywall and install 1/2" Denshield. No need to remove the cabinets. the Denshield will give you a nice solid surface to work with. Added benefit to this is that while the wall is open you can change the electrical box's to adjustable depth one's, once your tile is on you can ...


3

First the tile would not be installed right on top of the counter. You would need the same grout gap as the tile has guessing 1/8" - 1/16" would be the closest. So your gap isn't even that big. I would not rip this tile with a saw. I have used this before and it doesn't rip or cut well. If it were my house I would go to the tile store and find a ...


3

I spend a lot of time in France and in the midwest US. Customary in France if you put up a backsplash is to extend it before putting up cabinets. There is no caulking usually between the backsplash and the cabinets. Also the cabinets would be floating on the bottom most of the time. And the bottom cabinets are on legs - where in America they are almost ...


3

I tile behind the ones I do. First this takes little time. The top couple inches don't have to be perfect. I try to make everything look nice but in the grand scheme of things this is a few minutes of work and you already have the tiles, thinset, grout, and tools going so just do it. Some issues I have come across not tiling: The top row is almost ...


3

You use as many spacers as needed to get the outlet/switch mounting tabs flush with the tile. You may not need them if the mounting tabs of the box extender suggested by Mr Karas are tall enough to hold extender and device (just need longer screws: 6-32, in either case ) Die cut wallplate insulation gaskets: they go over switch/outlet and under wallplate. ...


3

While I'm tempted to say the difference is just marketing hype, you can use either one, there is a very slight difference in formulation. The window and door stuff has slightly less petroleum distillates in the formula, according to MSDS information at nih.gov. Petroleum distillates will evaporate during curing, so I'm unsure why there's a difference. The ...


3

In my opinion, the splash needs to be removed and point up the wall were the old splash used to reside and repaint. Then install a splash using the same specie of wood the countertop is made of, but prefinish it ahead of time before it is installed. No other blending needed.


3

The amount of time and labor involved in removing adhesive would be extensive. Even if you get the adhesive off, you will likely damage the surface of the underlying drywall. It may be much more efficient and effective to remove the drywall and replace with new. Use of a heat gun is questionable. Heat could crack the nearby marble if held near it too long. ...


3

A clean miter cut does indeed leave a very sharp corner. Since these are mill-finish, you can very lightly file or sand the resulting edge, just so it's not going to cut skin. You don't want to take so much that it's visually rounded. If that's not acceptable, the only other idea I have is to bevel the corners of your backsplash slightly using two 22-1/2* ...


3

The photos clearly show a terrible tile job. Tiles that are set crooked, tiles that are missing on the edge near the wall, grout lines of all different widths. If the tiles were that uneven on the mesh then i would not have purchased them. If i were the tile setter and they were that crooked i would have brought it to the attention of the home owner prior ...


3

Assuming you're installing cabinetry along the entire wall, I'd do this: Find the point on the back wall that sticks out the most. Measure out one cabinet depth and mark a line over the entire length of the floor. (Use a grout line as a reference-- even if your tiles are off-square, these are the lines your eyes will pick up as square.) Install cabinets to ...


3

Yes you can glue the backer to the wall. No matter what you do if the wall shifts there will be issues. Most the time if there is concrete I do not use backer unless there will be a large difference in surface height.


3

Borax is a great substitute for TSP. Mixed with water, it is a very good degreaser. Just scrub your walls with it and let it dry completely. Any ammonia-based cleanser will also do the job. With peel and stick tiles read and follow all the manufacturer instructions accurately.


3

Clear, slow (ie, not 5 minute set time) epoxy is what I'd use. Apply masking tape on the countertop exactly at the seam line. Same for the backsplash. Glue and set the backsplash (clamp gently in place), and wipe the joint clean of the excess. (Disposable gloves will be your friend, here, as epoxy is hard to clean.) Pull the tape and wipe the joint one more ...


3

YOU DON'T. If it isn't against a wall then it serves no function. The point of the backsplash is so the wall isn't hit with water. You want water on the sink (in a normal vanity situation) to go to the floor. Since in your situation water will go straight to floor, this piece is completely non-functional. Not only is it non-functional, but please ...


2

The best is to seal your grout. What some do not realize is that the grout needs to be sealed every 3 years. Especially if it is a heavily cleaned area or use.


2

It looks like a sanded caulk. The big box stores have these in their tile areas. I would find something that matches your backsplash grout.


2

CAULK IT!!! Work like an artist not a contractor. DON'T "smush caulk everywhere then wonder why it looks like butt when finished. Use ONLY what you need and "tool it in/smooth it out" using a damp finger, wiping frequently. I have been known to mask off the rectangle around the wall plates prior to starting (duct tape works very well on stone). I recommend ...


2

Generally finish material runs just short of the edge of the box. There are box extenders to bring the box level with the surface of the finish material. Cut tile edges are almost always a bit rough. To have them as a visible edge is problematic. Plates overlapping tile edges is almost always better.


2

I would use white caulk for this, hand-squeezed from the small tubes available at the hardware store. It's flexible enough that it won't crack as the wood cabinets move against the tile, and dries rubbery and impervious to water. Smooth it into the crack with your finger and it'll be nearly invisible. Takes about thirty seconds. Over time, you'll need to ...


2

Second thought: End-run around the whole problem You don't need to keep that exact configuration. You need 2 switches, and they make double switches on a single yoke (fits like a duplex receptacle). Move both switches to the rightmost yoke. Now the left yoke is a receptacle and an abandoned switch. You are entirely free to put whatever kind of common ...


2

The kitchen splash hardly ever gets wet enough to do anything to the drywall behind it. Travertine, since it is very porous, should be sealed to keep cooking grease, food splatters etc, from staining or discoloring the tile. The sealer will help prevent water passing through as well.


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